ファッション業界の裏側:年間1,300万トンの衣類廃棄物の現実

ファッション

What happens to the clothes we don’t buy? You might think that last season’s coats, trousers and turtlenecks end up being put to use, but most of it (nearly 13 million tons each year in the United States alone) ends up in landfills. Fashion has a waste problem, and Amit Kalra wants to fix it. He shares some creative ways the industry can evolve to be more conscientious about the environment — and gain a competitive advantage at the same time.

買わなかった服はどうなるのでしょうか?

昨シーズンのコート、パンツ、タートルネックが最終的に利用されるのではないかと思うかもしれませんが、そのほとんど(米国だけで年間約1,300万トン)が最終的に埋め立て地に捨てられます。

ファッションには無駄の問題があり、アミット・カルラはそれを解決したいと考えています。彼は、業界がより環境に配慮して進化し、同時に競争上の優位性を獲得できる創造的な方法をいくつか共有しています。

タイトル
3 creative ways to fix fashion’s waste problem
ファッションの無駄の問題を解決する3つの創造的な方法
スピーカー アミット・カルラ
アップロード 2018/03/09

「ファッションの無駄の問題を解決する3つの創造的な方法(3 creative ways to fix fashion’s waste problem)」の文字起こし

A few years ago, I found myself looking for the most cost-effective way to be stylish. So naturally, I wound up at my local thrift store, a wonderland of other people’s trash that was ripe to be plucked to become my treasure.

Now, I wasn’t just looking for your average off-the-secondhand-rack vintage T-shirt to wear. For me, real style lives at the intersection of design and individuality. So to make sure that I was getting the most out of the things I was finding, I bought a sewing machine so I could tailor the 90’s-style garments that I was finding, to fit a more contemporary aesthetic. I’ve been tailoring and making my own clothes from scratch ever since, so everything in my closet is uniquely my own.

But as I was sorting through the endless racks of clothes at these thrift stores, I started to ask myself, what happens to all the clothes that I don’t buy? The stuff that isn’t really cool or trendy but kind of just sits there and rots away at these secondhand stores.

I work in the fashion industry on the wholesale side, and I started to see some of the products that we sell end up on the racks of these thrift stores. So the question started to work its way into my work life, as well. I did some research and I pretty quickly found a very scary supply chain that led me to some pretty troubling realities.

It turned out that the clothes I was sorting through at these thrift stores represented only a small fraction of the total amount of garments that we dispose of each year. In the US, only 15 percent of the total textile and garment waste that’s generated each year ends up being donated or recycled in some way, which means that the other 85 percent of textile and garment waste end up in landfills every year.

Now, I want to put this into perspective, because I don’t quite think that the 85 percent does the problem justice. This means that almost 13 million tons of clothing and textile waste end up in landfills every year in just the United States alone. This averages out to be roughly 200 T-shirts per person ending up in the garbage.

In Canada, we throw away enough clothing to fill the largest stadium in my home town of Toronto, one that seats 60,000 people, with a mountain of clothes three times the size of that stadium. Now, even with this, I still think that Canadians are the more polite North Americans, so don’t hold it against us.

What was even more surprising was seeing that the fashion industry is the second-largest polluter in the world behind the oil and gas industry. This is an important comparison to make. I don’t want to defend the oil and gas industry but I’d be lying if I said I was surprised to hear they were the number one polluter. I just assumed, fairly or not, that that’s an industry that doesn’t really mind sticking to the status quo. One where the technology doesn’t really change and the focus is more so on driving profitability at the expense of a sustainable future.

But I was really surprised to see that the fashion industry was number two. Because maintaining that status quo is the opposite of what the fashion industry stands for. The unfortunate reality is, not only do we waste a lot of the things we do consume, but we also use a lot to produce the clothes that we buy each year. On average, a household’s purchase of clothing per year requires 1,000 bathtubs of water to produce. A thousand bathtubs of water per household, per year. That’s a lot of water.

It seems that the industry that always has been and probably always will be on the forefront of design, creates products that are designed to be comfortable, designed to be trendy and designed to be expressive but aren’t really designed to be sustainable or recyclable for that matter. But I think that can change. I think the fashion industry’s aptitude for change is the exact thing that should make it patient zero for sustainable business practices.

And I think to get started, all we have to do is start to design clothes to be recyclable at the end of their life. Now, designing recyclable clothing is definitely something to leave to the professionals. But as a 24-year-old thrift store aficionado armed with a sewing machine, if I were to very humbly posit one perspective, it would be to approach clothing design kind of like building with Lego.

When we put together a brick of Lego, it’s very strong but very easily manipulated. It’s modular in its nature. Clothing design as it stands today is very rarely modular. Take this motorcycle jacket as an example. It’s a pretty standard jacket with its buttons, zippers and trim. But in order for us to efficiently recycle a jacket like this, we need to be able to easily remove these items and quickly get down to just the fabric.

Once we have just the fabric, we’re able to break it down by shredding it and getting back to thread level, make new thread that then gets made into new fabric and ultimately new clothing, whether it be a new jacket or new T-shirts, for example. But the complexity lies with all of these extra items, the buttons, the zippers and the trim. Because in reality, these items are actually quite difficult to remove. So in many cases it requires more time or more money to disassemble a jacket like this. In some cases, it’s just more cost-effective to throw it away rather than recycle it.

But I think this can change if we design clothes in a modular way to be easily disassembled at the end of their lives. We could redesign this jacket to have a hidden wireframe, kind of like the skeleton of a fish, that holds all important items together. This invisible fish-bone structure can have all of these extra items, the zippers and the buttons and the trim, sewn into it and then attached to the fabric. So at the end of the jacket’s life, all you have to do is remove its fish bone and the fabric comes with it a lot quicker and a lot easier than before.

Now, recycling clothing is definitely one piece of the puzzle. But if we want to take fixing the environmental impact that the fashion industry has more seriously, then we need to take this to the next step and start to design clothes to also be compostable at the end of their lives. For most of the types of clothes we have in our closet the average lifespan is about three years. Now, I’m sure there’s many of us that have gems in our drawers that are much older than that, which is great. Because being able to extend the life of a garment by even only nine months reduces the waste and water impact that that garment has by 20 to 30 percent.

But fashion is fashion. Which means that styles are always going to change and you’re probably going to be wearing something different than you were today eight seasons from now, no matter how environmentally friendly you want to be. But lucky for us, there are some items that never go out of style. I’m talking about your basics — your socks, underwear, even your pajamas.

We’re all guilty of wearing these items right down to the bone, and in many cases throwing them in the garbage because it’s really difficult to donate your old ratty socks that have holes in them to your local thrift store. But what if we were able to compost these items rather than throw them in the trash bin? The environmental savings could be huge, and all we would have to do is start to shift more of our resources to start to produce more of these items using more natural fibers, like 100 percent organic cotton.

Now, recycling and composting are two critical priorities. But one other thing that we have to rethink is the way that we dye our clothes. Currently, 10 to 20 percent of the harsh chemical dye that we use end up in water bodies that neighbor production hubs in developing nations. The tricky thing is that these harsh chemicals are really effective at keeping a garment a specific color for a long period of time. It’s these harsh chemicals that keep that bright red dress bright red for so many years. But what if we were able to use something different? What if we were able to use something that we all have in our kitchen cabinets at home to dye our clothes? What if we were able to use spices and herbs to dye our clothes? There’s countless food options that would allow for us to stain material, but these stains change color over time. This would be pretty different than the clothes that were dyed harshly with chemicals that we’re used to. But dyeing clothes naturally this way would allow for us to make sure they’re more unique and environmentally friendlier.

Let’s think about it. Fashion today is all about individuality. It’s about managing your own personal appearance to be just unique enough to be cool. These days, everybody has the ability to showcase their brand their personal style, across the world, through social media. The pocket-sized billboards that we flick through on our Instagram feeds are chock-full of models and taste-makers that are showcasing their individuality through their personal microbrands. But what could be more personalized, more unique, than clothes that change color over time? Clothes that with each wash and with each wear become more and more one of a kind. People have been buying and wearing ripped jeans for years. So this would just be another example of clothes that exist in our wardrobe that evolve with us over our lives.

This shirt, for example, is one that, much to the dismay of my mother and the state of her kitchen, I dyed at home, using turmeric, before coming here today. This shirt is something that none of my friends are going to have on their Instagram feed. So it’s unique, but more importantly, it’s naturally dyed. Now, I’m not suggesting that everybody dye their clothes in their kitchen sink at home. But if we were able to apply this or a similar process on a commercial scale, then our need to rely on these harsh chemical dyes for our clothes could be easily reduced.

The 2.4-trillion-dollar fashion industry is fiercely competitive. So the business that can provide a product at scale while also promising its customers that each and every garment will become more unique over time will have a serious competitive advantage. Brands have been playing with customization for years. The rise of e-commerce services, like Indochino, a bespoke suiting platform, and Tinker Tailor, a bespoke dress-making platform, have made customization possible from your couch. Nike and Adidas have been mastering their online shoe customization platforms for years. Providing individuality at scale is a challenge that most consumer-facing businesses encounter. So being able to tackle this while also providing an environmentally friendly product could lead to a pretty seismic industry shift.

And at that point, it’s not just about doing what’s best for our environment but also what’s best for the bottom line. There’s no fix-all, and there’s no one-step solution. But we can get started by designing clothes with their death in mind. The fashion industry is the perfect industry to experiment with and embrace change that can one day get us to the sustainable future we so desperately need.

Thank you.

「ファッションの無駄の問題を解決する3つの創造的な方法(3 creative ways to fix fashion’s waste problem)」の和訳

数年前、私はスタイリッシュになる最も費用対効果の高い方法を探していました。当然ながら、私は地元の古着屋にたどり着きました。そこは他人のゴミの楽園で、私の宝になるために採取されるのを待っていました。

ただし、私が求めていたのは、平均的な古着から選んで着るようなものではありませんでした。私にとって、真のスタイルはデザインと個性の交差点にあります。だから、見つけたものを最大限に活用するために、90年代風の服を見つけて、より現代的なエステティックに合うように仕立てるために、ミシンを買いました。以来、私は服を仕立てたり自分で作ったりしていますので、私のクローゼットにあるすべてのものは私自身のものです。

しかし、これらの古着店の無限の服の中を整理していると、自分に問いかけるようになりました。私が買わない服はどうなるのか?本当にクールでもトレンディでもなく、ただそこに座って朽ち果てていくようなものは。

私はファッション業界で卸売り側で働いており、私たちが売っている製品の一部がこれらの古着店の棚に並ぶのを見始めました。そのため、この問題は私の仕事の中にも浸透し始めました。調査を行い、かなり早い段階で非常に恐ろしい供給チェーンを見つけ、かなり深刻な現実にたどり着きました。

結局のところ、私がこれらの古着店で整理していた服は、毎年廃棄される衣類の総量のわずかな一部に過ぎませんでした。アメリカでは、毎年生成される総衣類廃棄物のうち、わずか15%が寄付されたりリサイクルされたりするような形で利用されています。つまり、残りの85%の衣類廃棄物が毎年埋立地に投棄されています。

今、私はこれを視点を置いてみたいと思います。85%は問題を十分に表しているとは思いません。これはつまり、アメリカだけで毎年ほぼ1300万トンの衣類と織物廃棄物が埋立地に捨てられていることを意味します。これは、一人当たりおおよそ200枚のTシャツがゴミになることを平均化したものです。

カナダでは、トロントの私の故郷で最大のスタジアムを満杯にするほどの衣類が捨てられています。スタジアムの3倍の大きさの山になるものです。しかし、それでも、私はカナダ人の方がより礼儀正しいと考えていますので、私たちを責めないでください。

さらに驚いたのは、ファッション業界が石油・ガス産業に次ぐ世界第2位の汚染源であることでした。これは重要な比較です。私は石油・ガス産業を擁護したいわけではありませんが、世界一の汚染源がそれであることを聞いて驚いたとは言えませんでした。それは、公正に言って、それがステータスクォーに固執することをあまり気にしない業界だと思っていました。技術があまり変わらず、持続可能な未来のために利益を追求することが重要だという焦点があるというのがその理由です。

しかし、ファッション業界が第二位であることには本当に驚きました。なぜなら、そのステータスクォーを維持することは、ファッション業界の存在意義とは逆です。残念な現実は、私たちが消費するものの多くを無駄にしているだけでなく、毎年購入する服を生産するためにも多くの資源を使用しているということです。平均して、1世帯が1年間に購入する衣類は、1,000バスタブ分の水を生産するために必要です。1世帯あたり、1年間に1,000バスタブ分の水が必要です。それは多いですね。

デザインの常に進化し続ける業界が、快適さやトレンド性、表現性に重点を置いている製品を作る一方で、持続可能性や再利用可能性を設計することはあまりありません。しかし、これは変わると思います。ファッション業界の変化の能力は、持続可能なビジネス実践の始まりとして最適だと私は考えています。

そして、始めるために必要なのは、服を使用後にリサイクル可能にするように設計することです。今日、リサイクル可能な衣類をデザインすることは、専門家に任せるべきことです。しかし、ミシンを持っている24歳の古着愛好家として、謙虚に一つの視点を提案するなら、服のデザインをレゴブロックのように考えることです。

レゴブロックを組み立てると、非常に強力でありながら非常に簡単に操作できます。その性質上、モジュール化されています。現在の衣類デザインは非常にまれにモジュール化されています。このモーターサイクルジャケットを例に取りましょう。ボタン、ジッパー、トリムが付いた標準的なジャケットです。しかし、このようなジャケットを効率的にリサイクルするには、これらのアイテムを簡単に取り外し、素材だけにすぐにアクセスできるようにする必要があります。

生地だけが残れば、それを破砕して糸のレベルまで分解し、新しい糸を作り、それを新しい生地、最終的には新しい服に作り直すことができます。たとえば、新しいジャケットや新しいTシャツなどです。しかし、問題はこれらの余分なアイテム、ボタン、ジッパー、トリムにあります。実際、これらのアイテムは実際には取り外しにくい場合があります。そのため、このようなジャケットを分解するには、通常よりも時間がかかるか、お金がかかる場合が多いです。いくつかの場合は、リサイクルするよりも捨てる方がコスト効果が高いです。

しかし、私はこれが変わると思います。服をモジュール化して、使用終了時に簡単に分解できるように設計すれば、変わると思います。このジャケットを再設計して、魚の骨格のような隠れたワイヤーフレームを持つようにします。この透明な魚の骨構造には、ジッパーやボタン、トリムなどの余分なアイテムが縫い付けられ、それから生地に取り付けられます。そのため、ジャケットの寿命が終わったとき、魚の骨を取り外すだけで、生地が以前よりもはるかに速く、簡単に取り外されます。

今、服をリサイクルすることは確かにパズルの一部です。しかし、ファッション業界が持つ環境への影響を修正するのをより真剣に考えるなら、次のステップに進み、服を寿命が終わったときに堆肥化できるようにも設計する必要があります。クローゼットにあるほとんどの服の寿命は約3年です。今日着ているものよりもはるかに古いものが引き出しにある人が多いと思います。それは素晴らしいことです。なぜなら、服の寿命をたった9か月延ばすだけで、その服の廃棄物と水の影響を20〜30%削減できるからです。

しかし、ファッションはファッションです。つまり、スタイルは常に変わる可能性があり、どれだけ環境に優しい服を着たいと思っていても、8シーズン後には今日とは異なる服を着ているかもしれません。しかし、私たちにとって幸運なことに、スタイルが古くならないアイテムもあります。私が言っているのは、基本的なものです――靴下、下着、さらにはパジャマなどです。

私たちは皆、これらのアイテムを骨まで着用し、多くの場合、穴が開いている古くなった靴下を地元のリサイクルショップに寄付するのは本当に難しいので、それらをゴミ箱に捨てることがあります。しかし、これらのアイテムをゴミ箱に捨てる代わりに堆肥化できたらどうでしょうか?環境上の節約は膨大であり、私たちが行う必要があることは、もっと多くの天然繊維、たとえば100%オーガニックコットンを使用して、これらのアイテムを生産するためのより多くのリソースを移行し始めることだけです。

今、リサイクルと堆肥化は2つの重要な優先事項です。しかし、もう1つ再考する必要があることは、服を染める方法です。現在、私たちが使用している厳しい化学染料の10〜20%が、開発途上国の生産拠点に隣接する水域に流れ込んでいます。難しいことは、これらの厳しい化学物質が、長期間にわたって衣服を特定の色に保つのに非常に効果的であるということです。明るい赤いドレスを何年も明るい赤のままに保つのは、これらの厳しい化学物質のおかげです。しかし、もし私たちが何か違うものを使うことができたらどうでしょうか?もし私たちが自宅のキッチンキャビネットに持っているものを服を染めるために使うことができたらどうでしょうか?もし私たちがスパイスやハーブを使って服を染めることができたらどうでしょうか?材料を染色するための無数の食べ物の選択肢がありますが、これらの染料は時間とともに色が変わります。これは、私たちが慣れている化学物質で厳しく染められた服とはかなり異なるでしょう。しかし、このように自然に服を染めることは、それらがよりユニークで環境に優しいことを確認することを可能にします。

考えてみましょう。ファッションは今日、個性の表現です。それは、あなた自身の個人的な外見をちょうど十分にユニークにすることです。今日では、誰もがソーシャルメディアを通じて世界中で自分のブランド、自分のスタイルを披露する能力を持っています。私たちのInstagramフィードをめくるポケットサイズの広告看板には、自分の個性を自分の個人的なマイクロブランドを通じて表現するモデルやテーストメーカーが溢れています。しかし、時間の経過とともに色が変わる服、洗濯ごとに独自性が増す服は、より個人的でユニークなものではないでしょうか?人々は何年もの間、リップドジーンズを買って着用してきました。したがって、これは私たちの生活を通じて進化する服のさらなる例にすぎません。

このシャツは、例えば、私が今日ここに来る前にターメリックを使って自宅で染めたものです。これは、私の母と彼女のキッチンの状態にとって大変迷惑なことですが、私の友人たちのInstagramフィードには誰も持っていないものです。ですから、それはユニークですが、より重要なことは、自然に染められていることです。今、私は誰もが自宅の流しで衣服を染めることを提案しているわけではありません。しかし、もしこれと同様のプロセスを商業規模で適用できれば、私たちの衣服にこれらの厳しい化学染料に頼る必要が簡単に減少するでしょう。

24兆ドルのファッション産業は激しく競争しています。したがって、製品を規模で提供し、同時に各ガーメントが時間とともによりユニークになることを顧客に約束できるビジネスが、深刻な競争上の優位性を持つことになります。ブランドは何年もの間、カスタマイズを試みてきました。IndochinoやTinker Tailorなどの電子商取引サービスの台頭により、自宅からカスタマイズが可能になりました。NikeやAdidasは何年もの間、オンラインの靴のカスタマイズプラットフォームを熟成させてきました。規模で個性を提供することは、ほとんどの消費者向けビジネスが直面する課題です。したがって、これを解決すると同時に、環境にやさしい製品を提供することが、かなりの業界の変革につながる可能性があります。

そして、その時点で、私たちの環境のために最善の方法だけでなく、利益のために最善の方法でもあります。完璧な修復策もなければ、一歩の解決策もありません。しかし、私たちは衣服を彼らの終焉を考えて設計することから始めることができます。ファッション業界は、いつか私たちが必死に必要としている持続可能な未来にたどり着くための変化を実験し、受け入れるための完璧な産業です。

ありがとうございました。

コメント

タイトルとURLをコピーしました