愛とは何か?産むことから学んだ3つの革命的な教訓

社会

What’s the antidote to rising nationalism, polarization and hate? In this inspiring, poetic talk, Valarie Kaur asks us to reclaim love as a revolutionary act. As she journeys from the birthing room to tragic sites of bloodshed, Kaur shows us how the choice to love can be a force for justice.

ナショナリズムの高まり、二極化、憎悪に対する解毒剤は何でしょうか?

この感動的で詩的な講演の中で、ヴァラリー・カウルは私たちに革命的な行為として愛を取り戻すよう求めています。分娩室から悲劇的な流血現場へと旅するカウルは、愛するという選択がいかに正義の力となり得るかを教えてくれます。

タイトル
3 lessons of revolutionary love in a time of rage
怒りの時代における革命的な愛の3つの教訓
スピーカー ヴァラリー・カウル
アップロード 2018/03/06

「怒りの時代における革命的な愛の3つの教訓(3 lessons of revolutionary love in a time of rage)」の文字起こし

There is a moment on the birthing table that feels like dying. The body in labor stretches to form an impossible circle. The contractions are less than a minute apart. Wave after wave, there is barely time to breathe. The medical term: “transition,” because “feels like dying” is not scientific enough.

I checked.

During my transition, my husband was pressing down on my sacrum to keep my body from breaking. My father was waiting behind the hospital curtain … more like hiding. But my mother was at my side. The midwife said she could see the baby’s head, but all I could feel was a ring of fire. I turned to my mother and said, “I can’t,” but she was already pouring my grandfather’s prayer in my ear.

“Tati Vao Na Lagi, Par Brahm Sarnai.” “The hot winds cannot touch you.” “You are brave,” she said. “You are brave.”

And suddenly I saw my grandmother standing behind my mother. And her mother behind her. And her mother behind her. A long line of women who had pushed through the fire before me. I took a breath; I pushed; my son was born.

As I held him in my arms, shaking and sobbing from the rush of oxytocin that flooded my body, my mother was already preparing to feed me. Nursing her baby as I nursed mine. My mother had never stopped laboring for me, from my birth to my son’s birth. She already knew what I was just beginning to name. That love is more than a rush of feeling that happens to us if we’re lucky. Love is sweet labor. Fierce. Bloody. Imperfect. Life-giving. A choice we make over and over again.

I am an American civil rights activist who has labored with communities of color since September 11, fighting unjust policies by the state and acts of hate in the street.

And in our most painful moments, in the face of the fires of injustice, I have seen labors of love deliver us. My life on the frontlines of fighting hate in America has been a study in what I’ve come to call revolutionary love. Revolutionary love is the choice to enter into labor for others who do not look like us, for our opponents who hurt us and for ourselves. In this era of enormous rage, when the fires are burning all around us, I believe that revolutionary love is the call of our times.

Now, if you cringe when people say, “Love is the answer …” I do, too.

I am a lawyer.

So let me show you how I came to see love as a force for social justice through three lessons.

My first encounter with hate was in the schoolyard. I was a little girl growing up in California, where my family has lived and farmed for a century. When I was told that I would go to hell because I was not Christian, called a “black dog” because I was not white, I ran to my grandfather’s arms. Papa Ji dried my tears — gave me the words of Guru Nanak, the founder of the Sikh faith. “I see no stranger,” said Nanak. “I see no enemy.”

My grandfather taught me that I could choose to see all the faces I meet and wonder about them. And if I wonder about them, then I will listen to their stories even when it’s hard. I will refuse to hate them even when they hate me. I will even vow to protect them when they are in harm’s way. That’s what it means to be a Sikh: S-i-k-h. To walk the path of a warrior saint.

He told me the story of the first Sikh woman warrior, Mai Bhago. The story goes there were 40 soldiers who abandoned their post during a great battle against an empire. They returned to a village, and this village woman turned to them and said, “You will not abandon the fight. You will return to the fire, and I will lead you.” She mounted a horse. She donned a turban.

And with sword in her hand and fire in her eyes, she led them where no one else would. She became the one she was waiting for. “Don’t abandon your posts, my dear.” My grandfather saw me as a warrior. I was a little girl in two long braids, but I promised.

Fast-forward, I’m 20 years old, watching the Twin Towers fall, the horror stuck in my throat, and then a face flashes on the screen: a brown man with a turban and beard, and I realize that our nation’s new enemy looks like my grandfather. And these turbans meant to represent our commitment to serve cast us as terrorists. And Sikhs became targets of hate, alongside our Muslim brothers and sisters.

The first person killed in a hate crime after September 11 was a Sikh man, standing in front of his gas station in Arizona. Balbir Singh Sodhi was a family friend I called “uncle,” murdered by a man who called himself “patriot.” He is the first of many to have been killed, but his story — our stories barely made the evening news.

I didn’t know what to do, but I had a camera, I faced the fire. I went to his widow, Joginder Kaur. I wept with her, and I asked her, “What would you like to tell the people of America?” I was expecting blame. But she looked at me and said, “Tell them, ‘Thank you.’ 3,000 Americans came to my husband’s memorial. They did not know me, but they wept with me. Tell them, ‘Thank you.'”

Thousands of people showed up, because unlike national news, the local media told Balbir Uncle’s story. Stories can create the wonder that turns strangers into sisters and brothers. This was my first lesson in revolutionary love — that stories can help us see no stranger. And so … my camera became my sword. My law degree became my shield. My film partner became my husband.

I didn’t expect that. And we became part of a generation of advocates working with communities facing their own fires. I worked inside of supermax prisons, on the shores of Guantanamo, at the sites of mass shootings when the blood was still fresh on the ground. And every time, for 15 years, with every film, with every lawsuit, with every campaign, I thought we were making the nation safer for the next generation.

And then my son was born. In a time … when hate crimes against our communities are at the highest they have been since 9/11. When right-wing nationalist movements are on the rise around the globe and have captured the presidency of the United States. When white supremacists march in our streets, torches high, hoods off. And I have to reckon with the fact that my son is growing up in a country more dangerous for him than the one I was given.

And there will be moments when I cannot protect him when he is seen as a terrorist … just as black people in America are still seen as criminal. Brown people, illegal. Queer and trans people, immoral. Indigenous people, savage. Women and girls as property. And when they fail to see our bodies as some mother’s child, it becomes easier to ban us, detain us, deport us, imprison us, sacrifice us for the illusion of security.

I wanted to abandon my post. But I made a promise, so I returned to the gas station where Balbir Singh Sodhi was killed 15 years to the day. I set down a candle in the spot where he bled to death. His brother, Rana, turned to me and said, “Nothing has changed.” And I asked, “Who have we not yet tried to love?” We decided to call the murderer in prison. The phone rings. My heart is beating in my ears. I hear the voice of Frank Roque, a man who once said … “I’m going to go out and shoot some towel heads. We should kill their children, too.”

And every emotional impulse in me says, “I can’t.” It becomes an act of will to wonder. “Why?” I ask. “Why did you agree to speak with us?” Frank says, “I’m sorry for what happened, but I’m also sorry for all the people killed on 9/11.” He fails to take responsibility. I become angry to protect Rana, but Rana is still wondering about Frank — listening — responds. “Frank, this is the first time I’m hearing you say that you feel sorry.” And Frank — Frank says, “Yes. I am sorry for what I did to your brother. One day when I go to heaven to be judged by God, I will ask to see your brother. And I will hug him. And I will ask him for forgiveness.” And Rana says … “We already forgave you.”

Forgiveness is not forgetting. Forgiveness is freedom from hate. Because when we are free from hate, we see the ones who hurt us not as monsters, but as people who themselves are wounded, who themselves feel threatened, who don’t know what else to do with their insecurity but to hurt us, to pull the trigger, or cast the vote, or pass the policy aimed at us.

But if some of us begin to wonder about them, listen even to their stories, we learn that participation in oppression comes at a cost. It cuts them off from their own capacity to love. This was my second lesson in revolutionary love. We love our opponents when we tend the wound in them. Tending to the wound is not healing them — only they can do that. Just tending to it allows us to see our opponents: the terrorist, the fanatic, the demagogue. They’ve been radicalized by cultures and policies that we together can change.

I looked back on all of our campaigns, and I realized that any time we fought bad actors, we didn’t change very much. But when we chose to wield our swords and shields to battle bad systems, that’s when we saw change. I have worked on campaigns that released hundreds of people out of solitary confinement, reformed a corrupt police department, changed federal hate crimes policy. The choice to love our opponents is moral and pragmatic, and it opens up the previously unimaginable possibility of reconciliation. But remember … it took 15 years to make that phone call. I had to tend to my own rage and grief first. Loving our opponents requires us to love ourselves.

Gandhi, King, Mandela — they taught a lot about how to love others and opponents. They didn’t talk a lot about loving ourselves. This is a feminist intervention.

Yes. Yes.

Because for too long have women and women of color been told to suppress their rage, suppress their grief in the name of love and forgiveness. But when we suppress our rage, that’s when it hardens into hate directed outward, but usually directed inward. But mothering has taught me that all of our emotions are necessary. Joy is the gift of love. Grief is the price of love. Anger is the force that protects it. This was my third lesson in revolutionary love. We love ourselves when we breathe through the fire of pain and refuse to let it harden into hate. That’s why I believe that love must be practiced in all three directions to be revolutionary. Loving just ourselves feels good, but it’s narcissism.

Loving only our opponents is self-loathing. Loving only others is ineffective. This is where a lot of our movements live right now. We need to practice all three forms of love.

And so, how do we practice it? Ready? Number one … in order to love others, see no stranger. We can train our eyes to look upon strangers on the street, on the subway, on the screen, and say in our minds, “Brother, sister, aunt, uncle.” And when we say this, what we are saying is, “You are a part of me I do not yet know. I choose to wonder about you. I will listen for your stories and pick up a sword when you are in harm’s way.”

And so, number two: in order to love our opponents, tend the wound. Can you see the wound in the ones who hurt you? Can you wonder even about them? And if this question sends panic through your body, then your most revolutionary act is to wonder, listen and respond to your own needs.

Number three: in order to love ourselves, breathe and push. When we are pushing into the fires in our bodies or the fires in the world, we need to be breathing together in order to be pushing together. How are you breathing each day? Who are you breathing with? Because … when executive orders and news of violence hits our bodies hard, sometimes less than a minute apart, it feels like dying. In those moments, my son places his hand on my cheek and says, “Dance time, mommy?” And we dance.

In the darkness, we breathe and we dance. Our family becomes a pocket of revolutionary love. Our joy is an act of moral resistance. How are you protecting your joy each day? Because in joy we see even darkness with new eyes.

And so the mother in me asks, what if this darkness is not the darkness of the tomb, but the darkness of the womb? What if our future is not dead, but still waiting to be born? What if this is our great transition? Remember the wisdom of the midwife. “Breathe,” she says. And then — “push.” Because if we don’t push, we will die. If we don’t breathe, we will die.

Revolutionary love requires us to breathe and push through the fire with a warrior’s heart and a saint’s eyes so that one day … one day you will see my son as your own and protect him when I am not there. You will tend to the wound in the ones who want to hurt him. You will teach him how to love himself because you love yourself. You will whisper in his ear, as I whisper in yours, “You are brave.” You are brave.

Thank you.

「怒りの時代における革命的な愛の3つの教訓(3 lessons of revolutionary love in a time of rage)」の和訳

分娩台の上で死にそうになる瞬間があります。

陣痛中の体が不可能な円を形成するように伸びます。陣痛は1分も空けずにやって来ます。波が次から次へとやってきて、ほとんど呼吸する時間もありません。医学用語では「移行」と言います。なぜなら、「死に近いような感覚」というのは十分に科学的ではないからです。

確かめました。

私が移行中にいる間、夫は私の骨盤を押さえて体が壊れないようにしていました。父は病院のカーテンの後ろで待っていました… もっと隠れていると言った方が正確かもしれません。しかし、母は私の横にいました。助産師は赤ちゃんの頭が見えると言いましたが、私が感じたのは火の輪だけでした。私は母に向き直り、「無理」と言いましたが、彼女はすでに祖父の祈りを私の耳に囁いていました。

「Tati Vao Na Lagi, Par Brahm Sarnai.」 「暑い風はあなたに触れません。」 「あなたは勇敢です」と彼女は言いました。「あなたは勇敢です。」

すると、突然、私は母の後ろに祖母が立っているのを見ました。彼女の母がその後ろに立っているのを見ました。そして彼女の母がその後ろに立っているのを見ました。私の前には、私の前で火を乗り越えてきた長い列の女性たちがいました。私は深呼吸をしました。押しました。息子が生まれました。

私が彼を腕に抱き、私の体を満たすオキシトシンの一気の流れで震えながら泣いている間、母はすでに私のために食事を用意していました。私が私の赤ちゃんを授乳する間、私が私の赤ちゃんを授乳している母。母は私の出産から私の息子の出産まで、私のために労働し続けていました。彼女はすでに私が今まさに名付け始めたことを知っていました。愛は幸運にも私たちに起こる感情の一気の流れ以上のものです。愛は甘い労働です。激しい。血だらけ。完璧ではない。命を与える。私たちが何度も何度も選択するものです。

私はアメリカの公民権活動家で、2001年9月11日以来、人種差別のない政策やストリートでの憎悪行為に対して、有色人種のコミュニティと共に労働しています。

そして、私たちが最も苦しい瞬間、不正義の火の中で、私は愛の労働が私たちを救うのを見ました。私のアメリカでの憎しみと闘う最前線での人生は、私が革命的な愛と呼ぶものを学ぶ過程でした。革命的な愛とは、私たちに似ていない他者のために労働に入る選択です。私たちを傷つける相手のために、そして私たち自身のために。大きな怒りの時代に、周りが燃える中で、革命的な愛は私たちの時代の呼びかけだと信じています。

もし人々が「愛が答えだ」と言ったときに、あなたがひどく引っ込むなら、私もそうです。

私は弁護士ですから。

だから私がどのように愛を社会正義の力と見るようになったか、3つの教訓を通じてお見せしましょう。

私が憎しみに初めて出会ったのは学校の校庭でした。私はカリフォルニアで育った少女で、私の家族は100年間ここに住んで農業をしてきました。私はキリスト教徒ではないので地獄に行く、と言われ、白人ではないので「黒い犬」と呼ばれたとき、私は祖父の腕に飛び込みました。パパジは私の涙を拭い、シーク教の創始者、グル・ナーナクの言葉をくれました。「私は見知らぬ人を見ない」「敵を見ない」とナーナクは言いました。

祖父は、私が出会うすべての顔を見て、そのことについて考えることができると選択できると教えてくれました。そして、彼らの物語を聞くでしょう、たとえそれが難しいときでも。彼らが私を嫌っているときでも、私は彼らを嫌うことを拒否します。彼らが危険にさらされているときには、私は彼らを守ると誓います。それがシークであることを意味します:S-i-k-h。戦士聖人の道を歩むことです。

彼は私に、最初のシークの女性戦士、マイ・バゴの物語を教えてくれました。物語によれば、偉大な戦いの間、40人の兵士が帝国との間でポストを放棄しました。彼らは村に戻り、この村の女性が彼らに向かって言いました。「あなたは戦いを放棄することはありません。あなたは火の中に戻り、私が案内します。」彼女は馬に乗りました。彼女はターバンを巻きました。

剣を手に、目に炎を宿し、彼女は誰も行かない場所へと彼らを導きました。彼女は待ち望んでいた自分自身になりました。「ポストを放棄するな、私の可愛い人よ」。祖父は私を戦士として見ました。私は2つの長い三つ編みをした少女でしたが、私は約束しました。

20歳になり、ツインタワーが崩壊する様子を見て、恐怖が私ののどにつかえ、そして画面に顔が映ります:ターバンとひげの茶色い男。そして、私たちの国の新しい敵が私の祖父に似ていることに気づきました。そして、奉仕の意志を象徴するこれらのターバンは、私たちをテロリストとして描写しました。シーク教徒は、私たちのムスリムの兄弟姉妹とともに憎しみの標的になりました。

2001年9月11日以降の憎しみの犯罪で最初に殺されたのは、アリゾナ州のガソリンスタンドの前で立っていたシーク教徒の男性でした。バルビール・シン・ソディは私が「おじさん」と呼んでいた家族の友人で、自称「愛国者」と名乗る男によって殺されました。彼は最初の犠牲者ですが、彼の物語、私たちの物語はほとんど夕方のニュースにすら登らなかったのです。

私は何をすればいいのかわかりませんでしたが、カメラがありました。私は火に立ち向かいました。彼の未亡人、ジョギンダー・カウルのもとに行きました。私は彼女と一緒に泣き、彼女に尋ねました。「あなたはアメリカの人々に何を伝えたいですか?」私は非難を予想していました。しかし、彼女は私を見て言いました。「彼らに『ありがとう』と伝えてください。3000人のアメリカ人が私の夫の追悼式に来ました。彼らは私を知りませんでしたが、私と一緒に泣いてくれました。彼らに『ありがとう』と言ってください」

何千もの人々が現れました。国内ニュースとは異なり、地元のメディアがバルビール・おじさんの物語を伝えました。物語は、見知らぬ人を姉妹や兄弟に変える驚きを生み出すことができます。これが私の革命的な愛の最初の教訓でした—物語は私たちが見知らぬ人を見ないようにするのに役立ちます。そして…私のカメラは私の剣になりました。私の法学位は私の盾になりました。私の映画パートナーは私の夫になりました。

そのことを予想していませんでした。そして、私たちは、自らの困難に直面するコミュニティと共に活動する世代の一部となりました。私はスーパーマックス刑務所の中、グァンタナモ湾の岸辺、大量射撃事件の現場で、まだ地面に鮮血が残る時に働きました。そして、15年間、すべての映画、すべての訴訟、すべてのキャンペーンで、次世代のために国をより安全にしていると考えていました。

そして、私の息子が生まれました。その時…私たちのコミュニティに対する憎しみの犯罪が9.11以来最も高い水準に達している時代に。右翼ナショナリスト運動が世界中で台頭し、アメリカ合衆国の大統領を掌握している時代に。白人至上主義者が高く燃える松明を持ち、フードをかぶって私たちの通りを行進する時代に。そして、私の息子が、私が与えられたよりも彼にとってより危険な国で成長しているという事実と向き合わなければなりません。

そして、私が彼を守れない瞬間が訪れるでしょう。彼がテロリストと見なされる時…まるでアメリカの黒人が今でも犯罪者と見なされるかのように。茶色い人々は、不法滞在者。クィアやトランスの人々は、不道徳。先住民は、野蛮な存在。女性や少女は、財産として見られます。そして、私たちの身体を母親の子として見ることができなくなると、私たちを禁止し、拘留し、追放し、投獄し、安全の幻想のために私たちを犠牲にすることが容易になります。

私は立ち去りたかった。しかし、約束をしたので、バルビール・シン・ソディが殺された場所に15年ぶりに戻りました。私はそこでろうそくを置きました。彼が出血で死んだ場所に。彼の兄、ラナが私に向き直り、「何も変わっていない」と言いました。私は尋ねました。「私たちはまだ誰を愛そうとしていないのですか?」私たちは刑務所にいる殺人犯に電話することにしました。電話が鳴ります。私の心臓が耳の中で鳴っています。フランク・ロークという男の声が聞こえます。彼はかつて、「出かけてきて、いくつかのタオルヘッドを撃つつもりだ。子供たちも殺そうぜ。」と言った男です。

私の感情の衝動はすべて「できない」と言います。不思議になることは意志の行為になります。「なぜ?」と私は尋ねます。「なぜ私たちと話すことに同意したのですか?」フランクは言います。「私が何かが起こったことを悲しんでいますが、9.11で亡くなったすべての人々にも悲しんでいます。」彼は責任を取ろうとしません。ラナを守るために怒りがわき上がりますが、ラナはまだフランクについて不思議に思っています-聞いています-返答します。「フランク、あなたが悲しいと感じていると言うのを聞くのは初めてです。」フランクは言います。「はい、私はあなたの兄弟にしたことを後悔しています。いつか私が天国に行って神に裁かれるとき、あなたの兄を見たいと思います。そして彼を抱きしめます。そして彼に許しを求めます。」そしてラナは…「私たちはすでにあなたを許しました。」

許しは忘れることではありません。許しは憎しみからの解放です。なぜなら、私たちが憎しみから解放されると、私たちを傷つけた人々を怪物と見るのではなく、自分たちも傷ついている人々、自分たちも脅威を感じている人々、自分たちの不安をどうすればいいかわからない人々として見るからです。私たちを傷つけ、引き金を引いたり、投票を行ったり、私たちを狙った政策を通したりするために。

しかし、もしこの中の一部が彼らについて疑問を抱き、彼らの物語に耳を傾け、参加が抑圧に伴うコストがあることを学ぶと、彼ら自身が愛する能力から切り離されていることがわかります。これが私の革命的な愛に関する2番目の教訓でした。私たちは彼らの傷を看護するときに彼らを愛します。傷を看護することは彼らを癒すことではありません-それは彼らだけができることです。ただそれを看護することで、私たちは私たちの対抗者を見ることができます:テロリスト、狂信者、煽動者。彼らは一緒に変えることができる文化や政策によって過激化されています。

私たちのキャンペーン全体を振り返ってみると、悪漢と戦ったときにはあまり変化がなかったことに気付きました。しかし、私たちが剣と盾を使って悪いシステムと戦うことを選択したとき、それが変化を見るときでした。私は何百人もの人々を孤立独房から解放するキャンペーン、腐敗した警察部門の改革、連邦の憎悪犯罪政策の変更に取り組んできました。対抗者を愛する選択は、道徳的であり、実用的であり、かつ以前には想像もできなかった和解の可能性を開くものです。しかし、覚えておいてください…その電話をかけるのに15年かかりました。最初に自分自身の怒りと悲しみに気を配る必要がありました。対抗者を愛することは、私たち自身を愛することを必要とします。

ガンディー、キング、マンデラ-彼らは他者や対抗者を愛する方法について多くを教えました。しかし、自分自身を愛することについてはあまり話しませんでした。これはフェミニストの介入です。そうです。そうです。なぜなら、長い間女性や有色人種の女性が愛と許しの名のもとに怒りや悲しみを抑えるように言われてきたからです。しかし、怒りを抑えると、それが外向きの憎しみに硬化するときが来ますが、通常は内向きに向かいます。しかし、育児は私にすべての感情が必要であることを教えてくれました。喜びは愛の贈り物です。悲しみは愛の代価です。怒りはそれを守る力です。これが私の革命的な愛に関する3つ目の教訓でした。私たちは、痛みの火を通して息を吸い込み、それを憎しみに硬化させないようにするときに、自分自身を愛します。だからこそ、私は愛が革命的であるためにはすべての方向で実践されなければならないと信じています。自分だけを愛することは気持ちがいいですが、それはナルシシズムです。

他者を愛するためには、見知らぬ人を大切にしよう。例えば、街角や電車の中、画面の向こうにいる人たちを見て、「兄弟」「姉妹」「おじさん」「おばさん」と思ってみましょう。そうすることで、「あなたは私の知らない一部です。あなたのことを知りたいと思います。あなたの話を聞き、困っている時は助けになります」という意味になります。

そして、相手を愛するためには、傷を癒すことが大切です。自分を傷つけた人々の傷を理解できますか?彼らについて思いやることができますか?もしこれが難しい場合、自分の感情に向き合い、自分のニーズに応えることが一番の革命的な行為となります。

自分を愛するためには、深呼吸して前に進むことが大切です。私たちは世界の中で様々な困難に立ち向かっている中で、息を合わせて前進する必要があります。毎日の生活でどのように呼吸していますか?誰と一緒に呼吸していますか?大統領令や暴力のニュースが私たちの心を揺さぶる時、息子が私の頬に手を置いて、「踊ろうか、ママ?」と言ってくれると、私たちは一緒に踊ります。

闇の中で、私たちは呼吸し、踊ります。私たちの家族は革命的な愛の小さな場所となります。私たちの喜びは、道徳的な抵抗の行為です。あなたは毎日、自分の喜びをどのように守っていますか?なぜなら、喜びの中にあると、暗闇さえも新しい目で見ることができるからです。

ですから、母として私が問いかけます。この闇が、墓場の闇ではなく、子宮の闇ではないかと。私たちの未来が死んでいるのではなく、まだ生まれてくる待ちの状態にあるのではないかと。これが私たちの大きな変化なのではないかと。助産婦の知恵を思い出してください。「呼吸」と彼女は言います。そして、その後、「押してください」と。なぜなら、押さなければ死んでしまいます。呼吸をしなければ、死んでしまいます。

革命的な愛は、戦士の心と聖者の目を持って、火の中を押し進むことを要求します。そうしている間に、いつか、あなたは私の息子をあなた自身の子供のように見て、私がいないときに彼を守ります。彼を傷つけようとする者の傷を癒します。あなたが自分を愛しているので、彼に自分を愛する方法を教えます。あなたは彼の耳に囁きます。私があなたに囁くように。「あなたは勇敢です」。あなたは勇敢です。

ありがとう。

コメント

タイトルとURLをコピーしました