自動化の恐怖?仕事を奪うロボット時代の真実とは

仕事

“Will machines replace humans?” This question is on the mind of anyone with a job to lose. Daniel Susskind confronts this question and three misconceptions we have about our automated future, suggesting we ask something else: How will we distribute wealth in a world when there will be less — or even no — work?

「機械が人間に取って代わるのか?」この疑問は、仕事を抱えている人なら誰しもが抱く疑問です。

ダニエル・サスキンドは、この疑問と、自動化された未来について私たちが抱いている 3 つの誤解に対峙し、別のことを問うべきだと提案しています。仕事が減る、あるいはまったくなくなる世界で、富をどのように分配するのでしょうか?

タイトル
3 myths about the future of work (and why they’re not true)
仕事の未来に関する3つの通説 (そしてそれらが真実ではない理由)
スピーカー ダニエル・サスキンド
アップロード 2018/04/06

「仕事の未来に関する3つの通説 (そしてそれらが真実ではない理由)(3 myths about the future of work (and why they’re not true))」の文字起こし

Automation anxiety has been spreading lately, a fear that in the future, many jobs will be performed by machines rather than human beings, given the remarkable advances that are unfolding in artificial intelligence and robotics. What’s clear is that there will be significant change. What’s less clear is what that change will look like.

My research suggests that the future is both troubling and exciting. The threat of technological unemployment is real, and yet it’s a good problem to have. And to explain how I came to that conclusion, I want to confront three myths that I think are currently obscuring our vision of this automated future.

A picture that we see on our television screens, in books, in films, in everyday commentary is one where an army of robots descends on the workplace with one goal in mind: to displace human beings from their work. And I call this the Terminator myth. Yes, machines displace human beings from particular tasks, but they don’t just substitute for human beings. They also complement them in other tasks, making that work more valuable and more important.

Sometimes they complement human beings directly, making them more productive or more efficient at a particular task. So a taxi driver can use a satnav system to navigate on unfamiliar roads. An architect can use computer-assisted design software to design bigger, more complicated buildings.

But technological progress doesn’t just complement human beings directly. It also complements them indirectly, and it does this in two ways. The first is if we think of the economy as a pie, technological progress makes the pie bigger. As productivity increases, incomes rise and demand grows. The British pie, for instance, is more than a hundred times the size it was 300 years ago. And so people displaced from tasks in the old pie could find tasks to do in the new pie instead.

But technological progress doesn’t just make the pie bigger. It also changes the ingredients in the pie. As time passes, people spend their income in different ways, changing how they spread it across existing goods, and developing tastes for entirely new goods, too. New industries are created, new tasks have to be done and that means often new roles have to be filled. So again, the British pie: 300 years ago, most people worked on farms, 150 years ago, in factories, and today, most people work in offices.

And once again, people displaced from tasks in the old bit of pie could tumble into tasks in the new bit of pie instead. Economists call these effects complementarities, but really that’s just a fancy word to capture the different way that technological progress helps human beings. Resolving this Terminator myth shows us that there are two forces at play: one, machine substitution that harms workers, but also these complementarities that do the opposite.

Now the second myth, what I call the intelligence myth. What do the tasks of driving a car, making a medical diagnosis and identifying a bird at a fleeting glimpse have in common? Well, these are all tasks that until very recently, leading economists thought couldn’t readily be automated. And yet today, all of these tasks can be automated.

You know, all major car manufacturers have driverless car programs. There’s countless systems out there that can diagnose medical problems. And there’s even an app that can identify a bird at a fleeting glimpse.

Now, this wasn’t simply a case of bad luck on the part of economists. They were wrong, and the reason why they were wrong is very important. They’ve fallen for the intelligence myth, the belief that machines have to copy the way that human beings think and reason in order to outperform them.

When these economists were trying to figure out what tasks machines could not do, they imagined the only way to automate a task was to sit down with a human being, get them to explain to you how it was they performed a task, and then try and capture that explanation in a set of instructions for a machine to follow. This view was popular in artificial intelligence at one point, too.

I know this because Richard Susskind, who is my dad and my coauthor, wrote his doctorate in the 1980s on artificial intelligence and the law at Oxford University, and he was part of the vanguard. And with a professor called Phillip Capper and a legal publisher called Butterworths, they produced the world’s first commercially available artificial intelligence system in the law. This was the home screen design. He assures me this was a cool screen design at the time.

I’ve never been entirely convinced. He published it in the form of two floppy disks, at a time where floppy disks genuinely were floppy, and his approach was the same as the economists’: sit down with a lawyer, get her to explain to you how it was she solved a legal problem, and then try and capture that explanation in a set of rules for a machine to follow. In economics, if human beings could explain themselves in this way, the tasks are called routine, and they could be automated. But if human beings can’t explain themselves, the tasks are called non-routine, and they’re thought to be out reach.

Today, that routine-nonroutine distinction is widespread. Think how often you hear people say to you machines can only perform tasks that are predictable or repetitive, rules-based or well-defined. Those are all just different words for routine. And go back to those three cases that I mentioned at the start. Those are all classic cases of nonroutine tasks.

Ask a doctor, for instance, how she makes a medical diagnosis, and she might be able to give you a few rules of thumb, but ultimately she’d struggle. She’d say it requires things like creativity and judgment and intuition. And these things are very difficult to articulate, and so it was thought these tasks would be very hard to automate. If a human being can’t explain themselves, where on earth do we begin in writing a set of instructions for a machine to follow?

Thirty years ago, this view was right, but today it’s looking shaky, and in the future it’s simply going to be wrong. Advances in processing power, in data storage capability and in algorithm design mean that this routine-nonroutine distinction is diminishingly useful. To see this, go back to the case of making a medical diagnosis. Earlier in the year, a team of researchers at Stanford announced they’d developed a system which can tell you whether or not a freckle is cancerous as accurately as leading dermatologists. How does it work?

It’s not trying to copy the judgment or the intuition of a doctor. It knows or understands nothing about medicine at all. Instead, it’s running a pattern recognition algorithm through 129,450 past cases, hunting for similarities between those cases and the particular lesion in question. It’s performing these tasks in an unhuman way, based on the analysis of more possible cases than any doctor could hope to review in their lifetime. It didn’t matter that that human being, that doctor, couldn’t explain how she’d performed the task.

Now, there are those who dwell upon that the fact that these machines aren’t built in our image. As an example, take IBM’s Watson, the supercomputer that went on the US quiz show “Jeopardy!” in 2011, and it beat the two human champions at “Jeopardy!” The day after it won, The Wall Street Journal ran a piece by the philosopher John Searle with the title “Watson Doesn’t Know It Won on ‘Jeopardy!'” Right, and it’s brilliant, and it’s true. You know, Watson didn’t let out a cry of excitement. It didn’t call up its parents to say what a good job it had done. It didn’t go down to the pub for a drink. This system wasn’t trying to copy the way that those human contestants played, but it didn’t matter. It still outperformed them.

Resolving the intelligence myth shows us that our limited understanding about human intelligence, about how we think and reason, is far less of a constraint on automation than it was in the past. What’s more, as we’ve seen, when these machines perform tasks differently to human beings, there’s no reason to think that what human beings are currently capable of doing represents any sort of summit in what these machines might be capable of doing in the future.

Now the third myth, what I call the superiority myth. It’s often said that those who forget about the helpful side of technological progress, those complementarities from before, are committing something known as the lump of labor fallacy. Now, the problem is the lump of labor fallacy is itself a fallacy, and I call this the lump of labor fallacy fallacy, or LOLFF, for short. Let me explain. The lump of labor fallacy is a very old idea. It was a British economist, David Schloss, who gave it this name in 1892.

He was puzzled to come across a dock worker who had begun to use a machine to make washers, the small metal discs that fasten on the end of screws. And this dock worker felt guilty for being more productive. Now, most of the time, we expect the opposite, that people feel guilty for being unproductive, you know, a little too much time on Facebook or Twitter at work. But this worker felt guilty for being more productive, and asked why, he said, “I know I’m doing wrong. I’m taking away the work of another man.” In his mind, there was some fixed lump of work to be divided up between him and his pals, so that if he used this machine to do more, there’d be less left for his pals to do.

Schloss saw the mistake. The lump of work wasn’t fixed. As this worker used the machine and became more productive, the price of washers would fall, demand for washers would rise, more washers would have to be made, and there’d be more work for his pals to do. The lump of work would get bigger. Schloss called this “the lump of labor fallacy.” And today you hear people talk about the lump of labor fallacy to think about the future of all types of work. There’s no fixed lump of work out there to be divided up between people and machines. Yes, machines substitute for human beings, making the original lump of work smaller, but they also complement human beings, and the lump of work gets bigger and changes.

But LOLFF. Here’s the mistake: it’s right to think that technological progress makes the lump of work to be done bigger. Some tasks become more valuable. New tasks have to be done. But it’s wrong to think that necessarily, human beings will be best placed to perform those tasks. And this is the superiority myth. Yes, the lump of work might get bigger and change, but as machines become more capable, it’s likely that they’ll take on the extra lump of work themselves. Technological progress, rather than complement human beings, complements machines instead. To see this, go back to the task of driving a car. Today, satnav systems directly complement human beings. They make some human beings better drivers. But in the future, software is going to displace human beings from the driving seat, and these satnav systems, rather than complement human beings, will simply make these driverless cars more efficient, helping the machines instead. Or go to those indirect complementarities that I mentioned as well.

The economic pie may get larger, but as machines become more capable, it’s possible that any new demand will fall on goods that machines, rather than human beings, are best placed to produce. The economic pie may change, but as machines become more capable, it’s possible that they’ll be best placed to do the new tasks that have to be done. In short, demand for tasks isn’t demand for human labor. Human beings only stand to benefit if they retain the upper hand in all these complemented tasks, but as machines become more capable, that becomes less likely.

So what do these three myths tell us then? Well, resolving the Terminator myth shows us that the future of work depends upon this balance between two forces: one, machine substitution that harms workers but also those complementarities that do the opposite. And until now, this balance has fallen in favor of human beings. But resolving the intelligence myth shows us that that first force, machine substitution, is gathering strength. Machines, of course, can’t do everything, but they can do far more, encroaching ever deeper into the realm of tasks performed by human beings. What’s more, there’s no reason to think that what human beings are currently capable of represents any sort of finishing line, that machines are going to draw to a polite stop once they’re as capable as us.

Now, none of this matters so long as those helpful winds of complementarity blow firmly enough, but resolving the superiority myth shows us that that process of task encroachment not only strengthens the force of machine substitution, but it wears down those helpful complementarities too. Bring these three myths together and I think we can capture a glimpse of that troubling future. Machines continue to become more capable, encroaching ever deeper on tasks performed by human beings, strengthening the force of machine substitution, weakening the force of machine complementarity. And at some point, that balance falls in favor of machines rather than human beings. This is the path we’re currently on. I say “path” deliberately, because I don’t think we’re there yet, but it is hard to avoid the conclusion that this is our direction of travel. That’s the troubling part. Let me say now why I think actually this is a good problem to have.

For most of human history, one economic problem has dominated: how to make the economic pie large enough for everyone to live on. Go back to the turn of the first century AD, and if you took the global economic pie and divided it up into equal slices for everyone in the world, everyone would get a few hundred dollars. Almost everyone lived on or around the poverty line.

And if you roll forward a thousand years, roughly the same is true. But in the last few hundred years, economic growth has taken off. Those economic pies have exploded in size. Global GDP per head, the value of those individual slices of the pie today, they’re about 10,150 dollars. If economic growth continues at two percent, our children will be twice as rich as us. If it continues at a more measly one percent, our grandchildren will be twice as rich as us. By and large, we’ve solved that traditional economic problem.

Now, technological unemployment, if it does happen, in a strange way will be a symptom of that success, will have solved one problem — how to make the pie bigger — but replaced it with another — how to make sure that everyone gets a slice. As other economists have noted, solving this problem won’t be easy. Today, for most people, their job is their seat at the economic dinner table, and in a world with less work or even without work, it won’t be clear how they get their slice.

There’s a great deal of discussion, for instance, about various forms of universal basic income as one possible approach, and there’s trials underway in the United States and in Finland and in Kenya. And this is the collective challenge that’s right in front of us, to figure out how this material prosperity generated by our economic system can be enjoyed by everyone in a world in which our traditional mechanism for slicing up the pie, the work that people do, withers away and perhaps disappears.

Solving this problem is going to require us to think in very different ways. There’s going to be a lot of disagreement about what ought to be done, but it’s important to remember that this is a far better problem to have than the one that haunted our ancestors for centuries: how to make that pie big enough in the first place.

Thank you very much.

「仕事の未来に関する3つの通説 (そしてそれらが真実ではない理由)(3 myths about the future of work (and why they’re not true))」の和訳

自動化への不安が最近広がっています。人工知能やロボティクスの驚異的な進歩が続いていることを考えると、将来、多くの仕事が人間ではなく機械によって行われるようになるのではないかという恐れです。明らかなのは、大きな変化があるということです。しかし、その変化がどのようなものになるかははっきりしていません。

私の研究によると、未来は懸念と興奮の両方があるということです。技術による失業の脅威は現実的なものですが、それは良い問題でもあります。そして、その結論に至るまでの過程を説明するために、現在私たちの自動化された未来のビジョンを曇らせていると考える3つの神話に取り組みたいと思います。

私たちのテレビ画面や書籍、映画、日常の解説で見るイメージは、ロボットの軍団が一つの目標を持って職場に降り立つ場面です:人間をその仕事から追い出すことです。私はこれを「ターミネーターの神話」と呼びます。そう、機械は特定のタスクで人間を置き換えますが、彼らはただ人間を代替するだけではありません。彼らは他のタスクで人間を補完し、その仕事をより価値あるもの、より重要なものにします。

時には彼らは直接人間を補完し、特定のタスクでより生産的または効率的にします。タクシードライバーはナビゲーション用の衛星ナビゲーションシステムを使って未知の道を進むことができます。建築家はコンピュータ支援設計ソフトウェアを使ってより大きな、より複雑な建物を設計することができます。

しかし、技術の進歩は単に直接人間を補完するだけではありません。それは間接的にも人間を補完し、それは2つの方法で行われます。まず、経済をパイと考えると、技術の進歩はパイを大きくします。生産性が向上すると、収入が上昇し、需要が増えます。例えば、英国のパイは300年前の100倍以上の大きさになっています。したがって、古いパイのタスクから追い出された人々は、代わりに新しいパイの中で仕事を見つけることができます。

しかし、技術の進歩は単にパイを大きくするだけではありません。それはまた、パイの材料を変えます。時間が経つにつれて、人々は収入を異なる方法で使うようになり、それを既存の商品に広げたり、全く新しい商品に対する好みを開発したりします。新しい産業が生まれ、新しいタスクが行われなければならず、それはしばしば新しい役割が埋められることを意味します。ですから、再び英国のパイ:300年前はほとんどの人が農場で働き、150年前は工場で、今日ではほとんどの人がオフィスで働いています。

そして再び、古いパイのタスクから追い出された人々は、代わりに新しいパイのタスクに移ることができました。経済学者たちはこれらの効果を相補性と呼びますが、実際には、技術の進歩が人間を助ける異なる方法を捉えるためのファンシーな言葉に過ぎません。このターミネーターの神話を解決すると、労働者を害する機械の代替と、その逆の効果をもたらすこれらの相補性という2つの力が働いていることがわかります。

さて、2つ目の神話、私が知能の神話と呼ぶものです。車を運転する、医学的診断を行う、そして一瞥で鳥を特定するというタスクには、最近まで主要な経済学者が自動化が容易ではないと考えていたタスクが含まれています。そして、しかし今日、これらの全てのタスクは自動化できます。

ご存知のように、すべての主要な自動車メーカーが自動運転車のプログラムを持っています。数多くのシステムが医学的問題を診断することができます。そして、一瞥で鳥を特定するアプリさえあります。

これは単なる経済学者の不運なケースではなかったのです。彼らは間違っており、その理由が非常に重要です。彼らは知能の神話に陥ってしまったのです。すなわち、機械が人間を凌駕するためには、機械が人間が考え、推論する方法を模倣しなければならないという信念です。

これらの経済学者がどのようなタスクを機械ができないかを考えていたとき、彼らは、タスクを自動化する唯一の方法は、人間と一緒に座り、彼らにそのタスクをどのように実行しているのかを説明してもらい、その説明を機械がフォローする一連の指示に取り込むことだと想像しました。この見解は、人工知能でも一時期人気がありました。

私はこれを知っています。なぜなら、私の父であり共著者であるリチャード・サスカインドが、1980年代にオックスフォード大学で人工知能と法律に関する博士論文を執筆し、その先駆者の一人だったからです。そして、フィリップ・キャッパー教授と法律出版社のバターワースと共に、彼らは法律分野で世界で初めて商業的に利用可能な人工知能システムを制作しました。これがそのホーム画面のデザインです。彼は当時これがクールなデザインだったと私に保証しています。

完全に納得したことはありません。彼は、本当にフロッピーディスクがフロッピーであった時代に、その論文を2枚のフロッピーディスクの形式で出版しました。そして彼のアプローチは経済学者と同じでした:弁護士と座って、彼女に法的問題をどのように解決したのかを説明してもらい、その説明を機械がフォローする一連のルールに取り込むことを試みました。経済学では、人間がこのように自分自身を説明できる場合、そのタスクはルーチンと呼ばれ、自動化される可能性があります。しかし、人間が自分自身を説明できない場合、そのタスクは非ルーチンと呼ばれ、届かないと考えられます。

今日、そのルーチンと非ルーチンの区別は広く行われています。機械が予測可能で反復的、ルールベースで明確に定義されたタスクのみを実行できると人々が言うことがどれだけ多いか考えてみてください。これらはすべてルーチンの異なる言葉です。そして、最初に挙げた3つのケースに戻ります。これらはすべて非ルーチンのタスクの典型的な例です。

例えば、医師に医学的診断方法を尋ねると、彼女はいくつかの経験則を伝えることができるかもしれませんが、最終的には苦労するでしょう。創造性や判断力、直感などが必要だと言うでしょう。そして、これらのことは非常に説明しにくいため、これらのタスクが自動化するのは非常に難しいと考えられていました。もし人間が自分自身を説明できないのであれば、機械がフォローする一連の指示を書き起こすのはどこから始めればよいのでしょうか?

30年前、この見解は正しかったが、今では揺らいでおり、将来的には単に間違っているだろうということです。処理能力、データ保管能力、アルゴリズム設計の進歩により、このルーチンと非ルーチンの区別はますます有用ではありません。これを確認するには、医学的診断のケースに戻ります。今年の初めに、スタンフォードの研究チームが、ほくろが悪性腫瘍かどうかをあなたに伝えるシステムを開発したと発表しました。それは、トップの皮膚科医と同等の正確さで機能します。では、それはどのように機能するのでしょうか?

彼らの仕事ぶりを模倣しようとしているわけではありません。それは医学について何も知らないかもしれません。代わりに、過去の129,450のケースを通じてパターン認識アルゴリズムを実行し、それらのケースと特定の病変との類似性を探しています。これらのタスクは、人間の方法とは異なり、1人の医師が一生で見直すことができるケースよりも多くの解析に基づいて実行されています。その医師、その人間がどのようにそのタスクを実行したかを説明できなかったとしても、それは重要ではありませんでした。

これらの機械が私たちの姿で構築されていないという事実について悩む人々がいます。例えば、IBMのワトソンは、2011年にアメリカのクイズ番組「ジェパディ!」に出場し、2人の人間のチャンピオンを打ち負かしました。勝った翌日、ウォール・ストリート・ジャーナルは哲学者ジョン・シャールが執筆した記事を掲載しました。タイトルは「ワトソンは『ジェパディ!』に勝ったことを知らない」というものです。これは素晴らしいことであり、真実です。ワトソンは興奮して叫びませんでした。両親に喜びを伝えることもありませんでした。パブに行って飲みに行くこともありませんでした。このシステムは、これらの人間の出場者がプレイした方法を模倣しようとしていませんでしたが、それは重要ではありませんでした。それでも彼らを上回っていました。

知能の神話を解決することで、人間の知能についての私たちの限られた理解が、過去ほど自動化に制約を与えるものではないことがわかります。さらに、これらの機械が人間とは異なる方法でタスクを実行する場合、人間が現在行っていることが、将来これらの機械が行うことができるかもしれないものの頂点をどのように表現しているのかについては、何の理由もありません。

さて、三つ目の神話、私が「優越神話」と呼ぶものです。技術の進歩の助けについて忘れる者たちは、以前の補完的な要素に関してコミットメントしていないと言われることがよくあります。これは「労働の塊の誤謬」として知られています。問題は、「労働の塊の誤謬」自体が誤謬であるということであり、私はこれを「労働の塊の誤謬の誤謬」と呼んでいます。要するに、LOLFFです。説明します。労働の塊の誤謬は非常に古いアイデアです。1892年に、イギリスの経済学者デイヴィッド・シュロスがこの名前を付けました。

彼は、ねじの端に付ける小さな金属ディスクであるウォッシャーを作るために機械を使用し始めた荷役作業員に出会い、彼はより生産的になったことに対して罪悪感を感じていました。ほとんどの場合、私たちは逆を期待します。人々は生産性が低いことに対して罪悪感を感じることが多いですね、仕事中にFacebookやTwitterで過ごす時間が長すぎるとか。しかし、この作業員は、より生産的になったことに対して罪悪感を感じ、なぜかと尋ねると、「自分が間違っているとわかっています。他の人の仕事を奪っています」と言いました。彼の心の中では、固定された仕事の山が自分と仲間たちの間で分割されるべきであり、したがって、彼がこの機械を使ってもっと多くの仕事をすると、彼の仲間たちに残る仕事が少なくなると考えられていました。

シュロスはその間違いに気づきました。仕事の山は固定されていませんでした。この作業員が機械を使ってより生産的になるにつれて、ウォッシャーの価格が下がり、ウォッシャーの需要が増え、より多くのウォッシャーを作る必要があり、彼の仲間たちにする仕事が増えるでしょう。仕事の山は大きくなるでしょう。シュロスはこれを「労働の塊の誤謬」と呼びました。そして今日、人々はあらゆる種類の仕事の将来について考える際に「労働の塊の誤謬」について話します。人間と機械の間で分割されるべき固定された仕事の山はありません。はい、機械は人間の代わりになり、元の仕事の山を小さくしますが、彼らも人間を補完し、仕事の山は大きくなり、変わります。

しかし、LOLFF。ここでの間違いは、技術の進歩が行うべき仕事の山を大きくすると考えるのは正しいことです。一部のタスクがより価値あるものになります。新しいタスクが行われる必要があります。しかし、人間がそれらのタスクを行うのに最適な場所にいると考えることは必ずしも正しくありません。これが「優越神話」です。はい、仕事の山が大きくなり、変化するかもしれませんが、機械がより能力を持つにつれて、余分な仕事の山を彼ら自身が引き受ける可能性が高いです。技術の進歩は、人間を補完するのではなく、代わりに機械を補完します。これを理解するには、車を運転するというタスクに戻ります。今日、衛星ナビゲーションシステムは直接人間を補完します。いくつかの人間をより優れた運転手にします。しかし、将来、ソフトウェアが運転席から人間を追い出し、これらの衛星ナビゲーションシステムが人間を補完するのではなく、単にこれらの無人車をより効率的にするのを助けるだけです。また、私が先ほど言及した間接的な補完性にも言及してください。

経済的なパイが大きくなるかもしれませんが、機械がより能力を持つにつれて、新しい需要が人間よりも機械に最適な商品に求められる可能性があります。経済的なパイは変わるかもしれませんが、機械がより能力を持つにつれて、行われる必要のある新しいタスクを行うのに最適なのは機械である可能性があります。要するに、タスクの需要は人間の労働の需要ではありません。人間は、これらの補完的なタスクのうちで優位を保持する場合にのみ利益を得ることができますが、機械がより能力を持つにつれて、それはより少なくなります。

では、これらの3つの神話は私たちに何を示してくれるのでしょうか?まず、ターミネーターの神話を解決することで、仕事の未来は労働者に害を及ぼす機械の置換とその逆の補完的な関係のバランスに依存することがわかります。そして、今まで、このバランスは人間に有利に傾いてきました。しかし、知性の神話を解決することで、最初の力である機械の置換が強まっていることがわかります。もちろん、機械はすべてを行うことはできませんが、人間が行うタスクの領域にますます深く入り込んでいます。さらに、現在の人間の能力が何らかの完成点を表していると考える理由はありません。機械が私たちと同じくらい能力を持つと、礼儀正しく停止する理由はないということです。

これらの役立つ補完性の風が十分に強く吹き続けている限り、これは何の問題でもありませんが、優越の神話を解決することで、そのタスクの侵略プロセスは機械の置換の力を強化するだけでなく、これらの役立つ補完性を弱めることも示しています。これらの3つの神話を組み合わせると、その心配な未来の一端を見ることができます。機械はますます能力を持ち、人間が行うタスクにますます深く侵入し、機械の置換の力を強化し、機械の補完性の力を弱めます。そして、ある時点で、そのバランスは人間よりも機械に有利に傾きます。これが現在の私たちの進むべき道です。私は「道」という言葉を敢えて使っています。なぜなら、私はまだそこにいるとは思っていませんが、私たちの進む方向がこれであることを避けるのは難しいです。それが心配な部分です。では、なぜ私が実際にこれを良い問題と考えるのか、今述べましょう。

人類のほとんどの歴史において、1つの経済問題が支配的でした。それは、誰もが生活できるだけの経済的なパイを大きくする方法です。紀元前1世紀の転換点に戻ると、世界の経済パイを均等に分配すると、誰もが数百ドルを受け取ることになります。ほとんどの人が貧困線上またはその周辺で生活していました。

そして、1000年後を振り返っても、大体同じです。しかし、ここ数百年で、経済成長が加速しました。これらの経済的なパイは爆発的に成長しました。現在の世界のGDP1人当たりは約10,150ドルです。経済成長が2%で続けば、私たちの子供たちは私たちの2倍の裕福さになります。

1%で続けば、私たちの孫たちは私たちの2倍の裕福さになります。概して言えば、私たちはその伝統的な経済問題を解決しました。

しかし、技術的失業が起こる場合、1つの問題を解決しただけで、その結果として別の問題が生じます。

他の経済学者が指摘しているように、この問題を解決することは容易ではありません。今日、ほとんどの人にとって、仕事が経済的な食卓での席です。仕事が少なくなるか、あるいは仕事がなくなる世界では、彼らがどのようにして自分のスライスを手に入れるのかは明確ではありません。

たとえば、さまざまな形態の基本的所得保障について、議論が大いにあります。

アメリカやフィンランド、ケニアなどで試験が行われています。これが今、私たちの目の前にある共同の挑戦です。経済システムによって生み出されたこの物質的な繁栄が、伝統的な方法でパイを切り分けるための仕事が少なくなり、または消え去った世界で、誰もが楽しむことができるようにする方法を見つけることです。

この問題を解決するには、非常に異なる考え方が必要です。何をすべきかについては多くの意見の相違があるでしょうが、これは私たちの祖先を何世紀にもわたって悩ませた問題よりもはるかに良い問題であることを覚えておくことが重要です。

どうもありがとうございました。

コメント

タイトルとURLをコピーしました