ケープタウンの水危機!87リットル制限がもたらす新常識とは?

環境

According to the UN, nearly one in three people worldwide live in a country facing a water crisis, and less than five percent of the world lives in a country that has more water today than it did 20 years ago. Lana Mazahreh grew up in Jordan, a state that has experienced absolute water scarcity since 1973, where she learned how to conserve water as soon as she was old enough to learn how to write her name. In this practical talk, she shares three lessons from water-poor countries on how to save water and address what’s fast becoming a global crisis.

国連によると、世界中のほぼ3人に1人が水危機に直面している国に住んでおり、現在、20年前よりも水が豊富な国に住んでいる人は世界の5パーセント未満です。

ラナ・マザレさんは、1973 年以来完全な水不足に陥っているヨルダンで育ち、名前が書ける年齢になるとすぐに水を節約する方法を学びました。この実践的な講演で、彼女は水を節約し、急速に世界的危機になりつつあるものに対処する方法について、水の乏しい国々から得た 3 つの教訓を共有します。

タイトル
3 thoughtful ways to conserve water
水を節約するための 3 つの賢明な方法
スピーカー ラナ・マザレ
アップロード 2018/01/25

「3 thoughtful ways to conserve water」の文字起こし

In March 2017, the mayor of Cape Town officially declared Cape Town a local disaster, as it had less than four months left of usable water. Residents were restricted to 100 liters of water per person, per day. But what does that really mean?

With 100 liters of water per day, you can take a five-minute shower, wash your face twice, and probably flush the toilet about five times. You still didn’t brush your teeth, you didn’t do laundry, and you definitely didn’t water your plants. You, unfortunately, didn’t wash your hands after those five toilet flushes. And you didn’t even take a sip of water. The mayor described this as that it means a new relationship with water.

Today, seven months later, I can share two things about my second home with you.

First: Cape Town hasn’t run out of water just yet. But as of September 3rd, the hundred-liter limit dropped to 87 liters. The mayor defined the city’s new normal as one of permanent drought.

Second: what’s happening in Cape Town is pretty much coming to many other cities and countries in the world. According to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, excluding countries that we don’t have data for, less than five percent of the world’s population is living in a country that has more water today than it did 20 years ago. Everyone else is living in a country that has less water today. And nearly one out of three are living in a country that is facing a water crisis.

I grew up in Jordan, a water-poor country that has experienced absolute water scarcity since 1973. And still, in 2017, only 10 countries in the world have less water than Jordan. So dealing with a lack of water is quite ingrained in my soul.

As soon as I was old enough to learn how to write my name, I also learned that I need to conserve water. My parents would constantly remind my siblings and I to close the tap when we brushed our teeth. We used to fill balloons with flour instead of water when we played. It’s just as much fun, though.

And a few years ago, when my friends and I were dared to do the Ice Bucket Challenge, we did that with sand.

And you might think that, you know, that’s easy, sand is not ice cold. I promise you, sand goes everywhere, and it took ages to get rid of it.

But what perhaps I didn’t realize as I played with flour balloons as a child, and as I poured sand on my head as an adult, is that some of the techniques that seem second nature to me and to others who live in dry countries might help us all address what is fast becoming a global crisis.

I wish to share three lessons today, three lessons from water-poor countries and how they survived and even thrived despite their water crisis.

Lesson one: tell people how much water they really have. In order to solve a problem, we need to acknowledge that we have one. And when it comes to water, people can easily turn a blind eye, pretending that since water is coming out of the tap now, everything will be fine forever. But some smart, drought-affected countries have adopted simple, innovative measures to make sure their citizens, their communities and their companies know just how dry their countries are.

When I was in Cape Town earlier this year, I saw this electronic billboard on the freeway, indicating how much water the city had left. This is an idea they may well have borrowed from Australia when it faced one of the worst droughts of the country’s history from 1997 to 2009. Water levels in Melbourne dropped to a very low capacity of almost 26 percent. But the city didn’t yell at people. It didn’t plead with them not to use water. They used electronic billboards to flash available levels of water to all citizens across the city. They were honestly telling people how much water they really have, and letting them take responsibility for themselves.

By the end of the drought, this created such a sense of urgency as well as a sense of community. Nearly one out of three citizens in Melbourne had invested in installing rainwater holding tanks for their own households. Actions that citizens took didn’t stop at installing those tanks. With help from the city, they were able to do something even more impactful. Taking me to lesson two: empower people to save water. Melbourne wanted people to spend less water in their homes. And one way to do that is to spend less time in the shower.

However, interviews revealed that some people, women in particular, weren’t keen on saving water that way. Some of them honestly said, “The shower is not just to clean up. It’s my sanctuary. It’s a space I go to relax, not just clean up.” So the city started offering water-efficient showerheads for free. And then, now some people complained that the showerheads looked ugly or didn’t suit their bathrooms.

So what I like to call “The Showerhead Team” developed a small water-flow regulator that can be fitted into existing showerheads. And although showerhead beauty doesn’t matter much to me, I loved how the team didn’t give up and instead came up with a simple, unique solution to empower people to save water.

Within a span of four years, more than 460,000 showerheads were replaced. When the small regulator was introduced, more than 100,000 orders of that were done. Melbourne succeeded in reducing the water demands per capita by 50 percent.

In the United Arab Emirates, the second-most water-scarce country in the world, officials designed what they called the “Business Heroes Toolkit” in 2010. The aim was to motivate and empower businesses to reduce water and energy consumption. The toolkit practically taught companies how to measure their existing water-consumption levels and consisted of tips to help them reduce those levels. And it worked.

Hundreds of organizations downloaded the toolkit. And several of them joined what they called the “Corporate Heroes Network,” where companies can voluntarily take on a challenge to reduce their water-consumption levels to preset targets within a period of one year. Companies which completed the challenge saved on average 35 percent of water. And one company, for example, implemented as many water-saving tips as they could in their office space. They replaced their toilet-flushing techniques, taps, showerheads — you name it. If it saved water, they replaced it, eventually reducing their employees’ water consumption by half.

Empowering individuals and companies to save water is so critical, yet not sufficient. Countries need to look beyond the status quo and implement country-level actions to save water.

Taking me to lesson three: look below the surface. Water savings can come from unexpected places.

Singapore is the eighth most water-scarce country in the world. It depends on imported water for almost 60 percent of its water needs. It’s also a very small island. As such, it needs to make use of as much space as possible to catch rainfall. So in 2008, they built the Marina Barrage. It’s the first-ever urban water reservoir built in the middle of the city-state. It’s the largest water catchment in the country, almost one-sixth the size of Singapore.

What’s so amazing about the Marina Barrage is that it has been built to make the maximum use of its large size and its unexpected yet important location. It brings three valuable benefits to the country: it has boosted Singapore’s water supply by 10 percent; it protects low areas around it from floods because of its connection to the sea; and, as you can see, it acts as a beautiful lifestyle attraction, hosting several events, from art exhibitions to music festivals, attracting joggers, bikers, tourists all around that area.

Now, not all initiatives need to be stunning or even visible. My first home, Jordan, realized that agriculture is consuming the majority of its fresh water. They really wanted to encourage farmers to focus on growing low water-intensive crops. To achieve that, the local agriculture is increasing its focus on date palms and grapevines. Those two are much more tolerant to drought conditions than many other fruits and vegetables, and at the same time, they are considered high-value crops, both locally and internationally.

Locals in Namibia, one of the most arid countries in Southern Africa, have been drinking recycled water since 1968. Now, you may tell me many countries recycle water. I would say yes. But very few use it for drinking purposes, mostly because people don’t like the thought of water that was in their toilets going to their taps. But Namibia could not afford to think that way. They looked below the surface to save water. They are now a great example of how, when countries purify waste water to drinking standards, they can ease their water shortages, and in Namibia’s case, provide drinking water for more than 300,000 citizens in its capital city.

As more countries which used to be more water rich are becoming water scarce, I say we don’t need to reinvent the wheel. If we just look at what water-poor countries have done, the solutions are out there. Now it’s really just up to all of us to take action. Thank you.

「3 thoughtful ways to conserve water」の和訳

2017年3月、ケープタウンの市長は公式に、ケープタウンを地域の災害地域と宣言しました。使用可能な水が残りわずか4か月未満だったためです。住民は1人あたり1日100リットルの水に制限されました。でも、それって実際どういう意味なのかしら?

1日100リットルの水があれば、5分間のシャワーを浴び、顔を2回洗うことができ、おそらくトイレを約5回流すことができます。でも、歯を磨いたり、洗濯をしたり、植物に水をやったりはできません。それに、残念ながら5回のトイレの後に手を洗っていなかったのです。それに、一口も水を飲んでいませんでした。市長はこれを、水との新しい関係と表現しました。

今日、7か月後に、私は私の第二の故郷について2つのことをお伝えできます。

まず、ケープタウンはまだ水不足に陥っていません。でも、9月3日現在、100リットルの制限が87リットルに減りました。市長は、市の新しい正常として、永続的な干ばつの状態と定義しました。

次に、ケープタウンで起こっていることは、実質的には世界中の多くの他の都市や国にも波及しています。国連食糧農業機関によると、データがない国を除いて、世界の人口の5%未満が、20年前よりも水が多い国に住んでいます。他のすべての人々は、今日よりも水が少ない国に住んでいます。そして、約3人に1人が水の危機に直面している国に住んでいます。

私はヨルダンで育ち、1973年以来、絶対的な水不足を経験してきた水の貧しい国です。そして、2017年にもなって、世界でヨルダンよりも水が少ない国はたった10か国しかありませんでした。だからこそ、水不足と向き合うことは私の魂に深く根付いています。

私が自分の名前を書くことができるようになったとき、水を節約する必要があることも学びました。私の両親は、歯を磨くときに蛇口を閉めるように、私と兄弟姉妹に常に思い出させてくれました。私たちは遊ぶときに水の代わりに粉を風船に詰めました。それでも同じくらい楽しかったです。

そして数年前、友人たちとアイスバケットチャレンジに挑戦したとき、砂でやりました。

簡単だと思うかもしれませんが、砂は氷のように冷たくありません。お約束します、砂はどこにでも行って、取り除くのに時間がかかりました。

子どもの頃に粉の風船で遊んでいるとき、大人になって砂を頭にかけているときに、気づかなかったかもしれませんが、乾燥地域に住む私や他の人々にとっては当たり前の技術のいくつかが、急速に世界的な危機に対処するのに役立つかもしれないということです。

今日は、水の貧しい国からの3つの教訓、彼らがどのように水不足に対処し、さらには栄えたのかを共有したいと思います。

第一の教訓:人々に本当に持っている水の量を伝えること。問題を解決するには、まず問題があることを認める必要があります。そして、水に関しては、人々は簡単に目をそらし、水道から水が出ているからといって、すべてが永遠にうまくいくと思い込むことがあります。しかし、いくつかの賢明な干ばつに苦しむ国々は、自国がどれほど乾燥しているかを市民、コミュニティ、企業に知らせるためのシンプルで革新的な手段を採用しています。

今年の初めにケープタウンにいたとき、高速道路に電子看板があり、市が残された水の量を示していました。これは、オーストラリアが1997年から2009年にかけて国の歴史上最悪の干ばつに直面したときに、彼らが採用したアイデアかもしれません。メルボルンの水位はほぼ26%まで急激に低下しました。しかし、市は人々に怒鳴りませんでした。水を使わないようにと懇願しませんでした。市全体の市民に水の利用可能な量を示すために電子看板を使用しました。彼らは人々に本当に持っている水の量を正直に伝え、彼ら自身の責任を取らせました。

干ばつが終わるころには、これが緊急性と共同体意識を生み出しました。メルボルンの市民の約3人に1人が、自宅用の雨水貯水タンクの設置に投資しました。市民が取った行動は、それらのタンクを設置することで止まりませんでした。市の支援を受けて、さらに影響力のあることを行うことができました。次の第二の教訓へ:人々に水を節約する力を与えること。メルボルンは、人々に自宅での水の使用量を減らすように望んでいました。その方法の1つは、シャワーでの時間を短縮することです。

しかし、インタビューによると、特に女性の中には、その方法で水を節約したがらない人もいました。彼らの中には、「シャワーは単に清潔にするためだけではない。それは私の聖域です。くつろぐ場所であり、単にきれいにする場所ではありません」と正直に言った人もいました。そこで市は、省水型のシャワーヘッドを無料で提供し始めました。そして、今度は、シャワーヘッドが見た目が悪いとか、自分のバスルームに合わないといった人々が不満を述べました。

だから私が「シャワーヘッドチーム」と呼ぶものが、既存のシャワーヘッドに取り付けることができる小さな水流調整器を開発しました。シャワーヘッドの美しさは私にとってあまり重要ではありませんが、チームがあきらめず、代わりに人々に水を節約する力を与えるためのシンプルでユニークな解決策を考え出したことが好きです。

4年間で、46万以上のシャワーヘッドが交換されました。小さな調整器が導入されたとき、10万以上の注文が行われました。メルボルンは、一人当たりの水需要を50%削減することに成功しました。

世界で2番目に水不足の深刻な国であるアラブ首長国連邦では、2010年に「ビジネスヒーローズツールキット」と呼ばれるものが設計されました。目的は、企業に水とエネルギーの消費量を減らすように励まし、力を与えることでした。このツールキットは、企業が既存の水の消費量を測定する方法を実際に教え、その量を減らすためのヒントで構成されていました。そして、それはうまくいきました。

数百の組織がそのツールキットをダウンロードしました。そして、そのうちのいくつかが「企業ヒーローズネットワーク」と呼ばれるものに参加しました。ここでは、企業が1年間の期間内に水の消費量を事前に設定された目標に減らすためのチャレンジを自発的に引き受けることができます。このチャレンジを完了した企業は、平均して水を35%節約しました。例えば、ある企業は、オフィススペースでできるだけ多くの節水のヒントを実施しました。トイレの流し方、蛇口、シャワーヘッドなどを交換しました。水を節約できるものは何でも交換し、結果的に従業員の水の消費量を半分にまで減らしました。

個人や企業に水を節約する力を与えることは非常に重要ですが、それだけでは不十分です。国は現状を超えた視点で見て、国レベルの行動を実施する必要があります。

第三の教訓へ進みます。地下を見ること。水の節約は予期せぬ場所からも得られることがあります。

シンガポールは世界で8番目に水不足が深刻な国です。その水需要の約60%を輸入水に依存しています。また、非常に小さな島です。そのため、雨水を捕らえるために可能な限りのスペースを利用する必要があります。そこで、2008年にマリーナ・バラージが建設されました。それは都市国家の中心部に建設された初の都市用貯水池です。国内で最大の貯水池であり、シンガポールの約1/6のサイズです。

マリーナ・バラージの素晴らしいところは、その大きさと予期せぬが重要な場所を最大限に活用して建設されていることです。それは国にとって3つの貴重な利益をもたらしています。シンガポールの水供給を10%増やしました。海につながっているため、周囲の低地を洪水から守ります。そして、美しいライフスタイルの魅力として機能し、アート展から音楽フェスティバルまでさまざまなイベントを開催し、その地域にジョガーやバイカー、観光客を惹きつけています。

すべての取り組みが素晴らしいものである必要はないし、目に見える必要もありません。私の第一の故郷、ヨルダンは、農業が新鮮な水の大部分を消費していることに気付きました。彼らは本当に、農家に低水消費量の作物に焦点を当てることを奨励したかったのです。そのために、地元の農業はナツメヤシやブドウの栽培に焦点を当てています。これらの作物は、他の多くの果物や野菜よりも干ばつ条件に耐えやすく、同時に、現地でも国際的にも高い価値があります。

南アフリカの最も乾燥した国の一つであるナミビアの地元の人々は、1968年から再利用水を飲んでいます。今、あなたは多くの国が水を再利用していると言うかもしれません。そうです、と私は言います。しかし、ほとんどの国がトイレの水が蛇口に行くことを好まないため、飲料用に使用していません。しかし、ナミビアはそのように考える余裕はありませんでした。彼らは水を節約するために地下を見ました。彼らは今、廃水を飲料水の基準まで浄化することで、水不足を緩和し、ナミビアの首都に住む30万人以上の市民に飲料水を提供する素晴らしい例となっています。

水豊かであった国々が水不足になっている中で、私は私たちが車輪を再発明する必要はないと言います。水の貧しい国々が行ってきたことを見るだけで、解決策はそこにあります。今は本当に私たち一人ひとりが行動を起こすことにかかっています。ありがとう。

コメント

タイトルとURLをコピーしました