パンデミックも乗り越えた!パンドラ創業者の執念とソープオペラの勇気

エンターテインメント

Soap operas and telenovelas may be (ahem) overdramatic, but as Kate Adams shows us, their exaggerated stories and characters often cast light on the problems of real life. In this sparkling, funny talk, Adams, a former assistant casting director for “As the World Turns,” shares four lessons for life and business that we can learn from melodramas.

ソープオペラやテレビ小説は(まあ)過剰ドラマかもしれませんが、ケイト・アダムスが示すように、その誇張されたストーリーや登場人物はしばしば現実の問題に光を当てます。

このきらびやかで面白いトークでは、「As the World Turns」の元アシスタント キャスティング ディレクターであるアダムスが、ソープオペラから学べる人生とビジネスに関する 4 つの教訓を語ります。

タイトル
4 larger-than-life lessons from soap operas
ソープオペラから学ぶ4つの大きな教訓
スピーカー ケイト・アダムス
アップロード 2017/01/04

「ソープオペラから学ぶ4つの大きな教訓(4 larger-than-life lessons from soap operas)」の文字起こし

In 1987, Tina Lord found herself in quite the pickle. See, this gold digger made sure she married sweet Cord Roberts just before he inherited millions. But when Cord found out Tina loved his money as much as she loved him, he dumped her.

Cord’s mother Maria was thrilled until they hooked up again. So Maria hired Max Holden to romance Tina and then made sure Cord didn’t find out Tina was pregnant with his baby. So Tina, still married but thinking Cord didn’t love her, flew to Argentina with Max.

Cord finally figured out what was going on and rushed after them, but he was too late. Tina had already been kidnapped, strapped to a raft and sent over a waterfall. She and her baby were presumed dead. Cord was sad for a bit, but then he bounced right back with a supersmart archaeologist named Kate, and they had a gorgeous wedding until Tina, seemingly back from the dead, ran into the church holding a baby.

“Stop!” she screamed. “Am I too late? Cord, I’ve come so far. This is your son.”

And that, ladies and gentlemen, is how the soap opera “One Life to Live” introduced a love story that lasted 25 years.

Now, if you’ve ever seen a soap opera, you know the stories and the characters can be exaggerated, larger than life, and if you’re a fan, you find that exaggeration fun, and if you’re not, maybe you find them melodramatic or unsophisticated. Maybe you think watching soap operas is a waste of time, that their bigness means their lessons are small or nonexistent. But I believe the opposite to be true.

Soap operas reflect life, just bigger. So there are real life lessons we can learn from soap operas, and those lessons are as big and adventurous as any soap opera storyline.

Now, I’ve been a fan since I ran home from the bus stop in second grade desperate to catch the end of Luke and Laura’s wedding, the biggest moment in “General Hospital” history.

So you can imagine how much I loved my eight years as the assistant casting director on “As the World Turns.” My job was watching soap operas, reading soap opera scripts and auditioning actors to be on soap operas. So I know my stuff.

And yes, soap operas are larger than life, drama on a grand scale, but our lives can be filled with as much intensity, and the stakes can feel just as dramatic. We cycle through tragedy and joy just like these characters. We cross thresholds, fight demons and find salvation unexpectedly, and we do it again and again and again, but just like soaps, we can flip the script, which means we can learn from these characters that move like bumblebees, looping and swerving through life. And we can use those lessons to craft our own life stories.

Soap operas teach us to push away doubt and believe in our capacity for bravery, vulnerability, adaptability and resilience. And most importantly, they show us it’s never too late to change your story. So with that, let’s start with soap opera lesson one: surrender is not an option.

“All My Children”‘s Erica Kane was daytime’s version of Scarlett O’Hara, a hyperbolically self-important princess who deep down was scrappy and daring. Now, in her 41 years on TV, perhaps Erica’s most famous scene is her alone in the woods suddenly face to face with a grizzly bear. She screamed at the bear, “You may not do this! Do you understand me? You may not come near me! I am Erica Kane and you are a filthy beast!”

And of course the bear left, so what that teaches us is obstacles are to be expected and we can choose to surrender or we can stand and fight.

Pandora’s Tim Westergren knows this better than most. You might even call him the Erica Kane of Silicon Valley. Tim and his cofounders launched the company with two million dollars in funding. They were out of cash the next year. Now, lots of companies fold at that point, but Tim chose to fight. He maxed out 11 credit cards and racked up six figures in personal debt and it still wasn’t enough. So every two weeks for two years on payday he stood in front of his employees and he asked them to sacrifice their salaries, and it worked. More than 50 people deferred two million dollars, and now, more than a decade later, Pandora is worth billions. When you believe that there is a way around or through whatever is in front of you, that surrender is not an option, you can overcome enormous obstacles.

Which brings us to soap opera lesson two: sacrifice your ego and drop the superiority complex. Now, this is scary. It’s an acknowledgment of need or fallibility. Maybe it’s even an admission that we’re not as special as we might like to think. Stephanie Forrester of “The Bold and the Beautiful” thought she was pretty darn special. She thought she was so special, she didn’t need to mix with the riffraff from the valley, and she made sure valley girl Brooke knew it. But after nearly 25 years of epic fighting, Stephanie got sick and let Brooke in. They made amends, archenemies became soul mates and Stephanie died in Brooke’s arms, and here’s our takeaway. Drop your ego. Life is not about you. It’s about us, and our ability to experience joy and love and to improve our reality comes only when we make ourselves vulnerable and we accept responsibility for our actions and our inactions, kind of like Howard Schultz, the CEO of Starbucks. Now, after a great run as CEO, Howard stepped down in 2000, and Starbucks quickly overextended itself and stock prices fell. Howard rejoined the team in 2008, and one of the first things he did was apologize to all 180,000 employees. He apologized. And then he asked for help, honesty, and ideas in return. And now, Starbucks has more than doubled its net revenue since Howard came back. So sacrifice your desire to be right or safe all the time. It’s not helping anyone, least of all you. Sacrifice your ego.

Soap opera lesson three: evolution is real.

You’re not meant to be static characters. On television, static equals boring and boring equals fired. Characters are supposed to grow and change.

Now, on TV, those dynamic changes can make for some rough transitions, particularly when a character is played by one person yesterday and played by someone new today. Recasting happens all the time on soaps.

Over the last 20 years, four different actors have played the same key role of Carly Benson on “General Hospital.” Each new face triggered a change in the character’s life and personality.

Now, there was always an essential nugget of Carly in there, but the character and the story adapted to whomever was playing her. And here’s what that means for us. While we may not swap faces in our own lives, we can evolve too.

We can choose to draw a circle around our feet and stay in that spot, or we can open ourselves to opportunities like Carly, who went from nursing student to hotel owner, or like Julia Child.

Julia was a World War II spy, and when the war ended, she got married, moved to France, and decided to give culinary school a shot. Julia, her books and her TV shows revolutionized the way America cooks.

We all have the power to initiate change in our lives, to evolve and adapt. We make the choice, but sometimes life chooses for us, and we don’t get a heads up.

Surprise slams us in the face. You’re flat on the ground, the air is gone, and you need resuscitation. So thank goodness for soap opera lesson four: resurrection is possible.

In 1983, “Days of Our Lives”‘ Stefano DiMera died of a stroke, but not really, because in 1984 he died when his car plunged into the harbor, and yet he was back in 1985 with a brain tumor.

But before the tumor could kill him, Marlena shot him, and he tumbled off a catwalk to his death. And so it went for 30 years.

Even when we saw the body, we knew better.

He’s called the Phoenix for a reason. And here’s what that means for us. As long as the show is still on the air, or you’re still breathing, nothing is permanent. Resurrection is possible.

Now, of course, just like life, soap operas do ultimately meet the big finale. CBS canceled my show, “As The World Turns,” in December 2009, and we shot our final episode in June 2010.

It was six months of dying, and I rode that train right into the mountain. And even though we were in the middle of a huge recession and millions of people were struggling to find work, I somehow thought everything would be OK.

So I packed up the kids and the Brooklyn apartment, and we moved in with my in-laws in Alabama.

Three months later, nothing was OK. That was when I watched the final episode air, and I realized the show was not the only fatality. I was one too. I was unemployed and living on the second floor of my in-laws’ home, and that’s enough to make anyone feel dead inside.

But I knew my story wasn’t over, that it couldn’t be over. I just had to tap into everything I had ever learned about soap operas. I had to be brave like Erica and refuse to surrender, so every day, I made a decision to fight. I had to be vulnerable like Stephanie and sacrifice my ego. I had to ask for help a lot of times across many states. I had to be adaptable like Carly and evolve my skills, my mindset, and my circumstances, and then I had to be resilient, like Stefano, and resurrect myself and my career like a phoenix from the ashes.

Eventually I got an interview. After 15 years in news and entertainment, nine months of unemployment and this one interview, I had an offer for an entry level job. I was 37 years old and I was back from the dead.

We will all experience what looks like an ending, and we can choose to make it a beginning. Kind of like Tina, who miraculously survived that waterfall, and because I hate to leave a cliffhanger hanging, Tina and Cord did get divorced, but they got remarried three times before the show went off the air in 2012.

So remember, as long as there is breath in your body, it’s never too late to change your story. Thank you.

「ソープオペラから学ぶ4つの大きな教訓(4 larger-than-life lessons from soap operas)」の和訳

1987年、ティナ・ロードは大変な立場に置かれました。彼女は金目当てで、コード・ロバーツと結婚し、彼が数百万ドルを相続する直前に結婚を済ませました。しかし、ティナがコードのお金を愛していることを知ったとき、彼は彼女を捨てました。

コードの母親であるマリアは彼らが再び仲良くなるまで喜んでいました。だから、マリアはマックス・ホールデンを雇ってティナを口説かせ、そしてコードがティナが彼の子供を妊娠していることを知らないようにしました。だから、まだ結婚していましたが、コードが彼女を愛していないと思っていたティナは、マックスと一緒にアルゼンチンに飛びました。

コードはついに状況を理解し、後を追いかけましたが、遅かったです。ティナはすでに誘拐され、いかだに縛られ、滝から落とされていました。彼女と彼女の赤ちゃんは死亡したと推定されました。コードはしばらく悲しんだが、すぐにスーパースマートな考古学者ケイトと結婚し、彼らは素晴らしい結婚式を挙げました。しかし、死者から戻ってきたようなティナが教会に走り込み、赤ちゃんを抱えて現れたとき、すべてが変わりました。

「止まって!」「遅すぎるかしら?コード、こんなに苦労してきたわ。これがあなたの息子よ。」

そして、これが、女性と紳士の皆さん、25年続いた愛の物語を紹介したテレビドラマ「One Life to Live」の物語でした。

今、もしソープオペラを見たことがあるなら、物語やキャラクターが誇張されており、生活よりも大きいことを知っているでしょう。ファンであれば、その誇張が楽しいと感じるかもしれませんが、ファンでなければ、その過剰演出がメロドラマチックで未熟だと感じるかもしれません。ソープオペラを見ることは時間の無駄だと考えるかもしれませんが、その大きさがその教訓を小さくまたは存在しないものとすると思うかもしれません。しかし、私はその逆を信じています。

ソープオペラは人生を反映しています、ただ大きく。だからこそ、ソープオペラから学べる実生活の教訓があります。そして、それらの教訓は、どのソープオペラの物語よりも大きくて冒険的です。

私は2年生のとき、バス停から家に帰るときに必死で「ジェネラル・ホスピタル」のルークとローラの結婚式の終わりを見逃さないようにしました。それが「As the World Turns」の助手キャスティングディレクターとして8年間を過ごしたので、私がいかに大好きか想像できるでしょう。私の仕事は、ソープオペラを見ること、ソープオペラの台本を読むこと、そしてソープオペラに出演する俳優のオーディションをすることでした。だから私は自分のことを知っています。

そして、そうです、ソープオペラは生活よりも大げさで、大きなスケールのドラマですが、私たちの生活も同じように激しさに満ちており、賭けの額も同じくらいドラマチックに感じることがあります。私たちはこれらのキャラクターと同じように悲劇と喜びを繰り返し、しばしば予期せぬ救いを見つけるために闘い、悪魔と戦い、閾値を越えます。そして、それを何度も繰り返しますが、ソープオペラのように、私たちは脚本を変えることができます。つまり、私たちはハチのように動くこれらのキャラクターから学び、人生の物語を作り上げるためにその教訓を活用できます。

ソープオペラは、疑いを払いのけ、勇気、脆弱性、適応力、そして回復力の可能性を信じることを私たちに教えます。そして、最も重要なことは、物語を変えるのに遅すぎることはないということを示しています。ですから、それでは、ソープオペラの第一の教訓から始めましょう:降伏は選択肢ではありません。

「オール・マイ・チルドレン」のエリカ・ケインは、昼間のスカーレット・オハラのような存在でした。自己中心的で重要なプリンセスでありながら、心の底では果敢で大胆でした。彼女がテレビで41年間過ごした中で、おそらくエリカの最も有名なシーンは、彼女が森の中で一人で突然グリズリーベアと対面したときです。彼女はクマに向かって叫びました。「あなたはこれをしてはいけません!わかりますか?あなたは汚い獣です!」そしてもちろん、クマは去りました。これが私たちに教えてくれることは、障害は予想されるものであり、降伏するか、立ち向かうかを選ぶことができるということです。

パンドラのティム・ウェスターグレンは、このことをほとんどの人よりもよく知っています。彼をシリコンバレーのエリカ・ケインと呼んでもいいかもしれません。ティムと彼の共同創設者は、200万ドルの資金を投入して会社を立ち上げました。次の年には資金が尽きました。これで多くの会社が倒産しますが、ティムは戦うことを選びました。彼は11枚のクレジットカードを最大限に使い果たし、6桁の個人の負債を抱え、それでも足りませんでした。だから、毎週の給料日に、2年間、彼は従業員の前で立ち、彼らに給料を犠牲にするように頼みました。そして、それはうまくいきました。 50人以上の人々が200万ドルを繰り延べ、今では10年以上後には、パンドラは数十億ドルの価値があります。あなたが前に立っているものの回りや通り抜ける方法があると信じるとき、降伏は選択肢ではないと信じるとき、あなたは巨大な障害を乗り越えることができます。

それで、ソープオペラの第二の教訓に至ります:自尊心を犠牲にし、優越感を捨てる。これは恐ろしいことです。それは必要性や欠点を認めることです。おそらく、私たちは思い描いているほど特別ではないという自覚でさえあるかもしれません。『ザ・ボールド・アンド・ザ・ビューティフル』のステファニー・フォレスターは、自分がかなり特別だと思っていました。彼女は自分が特別だと思っていたので、谷から来た下層階級と混ざる必要はないと思っていました。そして、谷のガール、ブルックがそれを知るようにしました。しかし、25年近くにわたる壮大な戦いの後、ステファニーは病気になり、ブルックを受け入れました。彼らは和解し、宿敵はソウルメイトになり、ステファニーはブルックの腕の中で亡くなりました。そして、ここでの教訓は次のとおりです。自尊心を捨てなさい。人生はあなたのことではないのです。それは私たちについてであり、喜びや愛を経験し、現実を改善する能力は、私たち自身を脆弱にし、自分の行動と無行動に責任を負うときだけに得られます。まるでスターバックスのCEOであるハワード・シュルツのようなものです。優れたCEOとしての大成功の後、ハワードは2000年に退任し、スターバックスはすぐに自己拡張し、株価は下落しました。ハワードは2008年にチームに復帰し、最初に18万人の従業員全員に謝罪しました。彼は謝罪しました。そして、報復として助けや誠実さ、アイデアを求めました。そして今、ハワードが戻って以来、スターバックスは純収益を倍増させました。常に正しいことや安全なことを望むことを犠牲にしてください。それは誰にとっても役立ちません、特にあなたにとっても。自尊心を犠牲にしてください。

ソープオペラの第三の教訓:進化は現実です。

あなたは静的なキャラクターであるべきではありません。テレビでは、静的なものは退屈であり、退屈は解雇されることを意味します。

テレビでは、そのダイナミックな変化は時には粗い移行をもたらすことがあります、特にキャラクターが昨日は一人の人物によって演じられ、今日は別の人物によって演じられる場合は。ソープオペラでは再キャスティングがよく行われます。

過去20年間で、『ジェネラル・ホスピタル』のカーリー・ベンソンという重要な役を4人の異なる俳優が演じています。新しい顔が現れるたびに、キャラクターの人生や性格が変わりました。

カーリーの中には常に本質的な核がありましたが、キャラクターと物語は彼女を演じる人物に合わせて適応しました。そして、それが私たちにとって何を意味するかというと、私たちは自分の人生で顔を交換することはなくても、私たちも進化できるということです。

私たちは自分の足元に円を描いてその場にとどまることを選ぶこともできますし、看護学生からホテルオーナーになったカーリーや、ジュリア・チャイルドのような機会を受け入れることもできます。

ジュリアは第二次世界大戦中のスパイで、戦争が終わると結婚し、フランスに移住して料理学校に挑戦しました。ジュリアと彼女の本やテレビ番組は、アメリカの料理方法を革命的に変えました。

私たち皆には、自分の人生で変化を引き起こし、進化し、適応する力があります。私たちが選択をし、時には人生が私たちを選択し、事前通知を受けることはありません。

驚きが私たちの顔を打つ。あなたは地面に平らになり、空気がなくなり、蘇生が必要です。だから、幸いなことに、ソープオペラの第四の教訓があります:復活は可能です。

1983年、「デイズ・オブ・アワー・ライフ」のステファノ・ディメラは脳卒中で亡くなりましたが、実際にはそうではありませんでした。なぜなら、1984年には彼の車が港に転落し、彼が死亡したとされたからですが、1985年には脳腫瘍で復活しました。

しかし、腫瘍が彼を殺す前に、マルレーナが彼を撃ち、彼はキャットウォークから転落して死にました。そして30年間それは続きました。

私たちは死体を見ても、より良いことを知っていました。

彼は理由があってフェニックスと呼ばれています。そして、それが私たちにとって何を意味するかというと、ショーがまだ放送されている限り、またはあなたがまだ呼吸している限り、何も永続的ではないということです。復活は可能です。

もちろん、人生と同様に、ソープオペラも最終的に大きなフィナーレに遭遇します。CBSは私の番組、「アズ・ザ・ワールド・ターンズ」を2009年12月にキャンセルし、最終エピソードを2010年6月に撮影しました。

それは6か月間の死のようなものであり、私はその列車に乗って山にぶつかりました。そして、私は何百万人もの人々が仕事を見つけようと苦しんでいる中、なぜかすべてが大丈夫になると思いました。

だから私は子供たちとブルックリンのアパートを詰め込んで、アラバマの義理の両親の家に引っ越しました。

3か月後、何も大丈夫ではありませんでした。それが最終エピソードが放映され、私がショーだけでなく自分も犠牲になっていることを悟った時でした。私は失業し、義理の両親の家の2階に住んでおり、それは誰もが内面で死んだように感じさせる十分なことでした。

しかし、私は自分の物語が終わっていないことを知っていました。終わってはいけない。私はこれまでソープオペラから学んだすべてを活用しなければなりませんでした。私はエリカのように勇敢で降伏せず、毎日戦う決断をしました。私はステファニーのように脆弱になり、自尊心を犠牲にしなければなりませんでした。私は多くの州をまたいで何度も助けを求めなければなりませんでした。私はカーリーのように適応力を持ち、スキルや考え方、状況を進化させなければなりませんでした。そして、私はステファノのように、自分自身と自分のキャリアを不死鳥のように灰からよみがえらせるために強靭である必要がありました。

最終的に私は面接を受けました。ニュースやエンターテインメントで15年、9か月の失業期間の後、この1つの面接でエントリーレベルの仕事のオファーを受けました。私は37歳で死者から蘇りました。

私たちは皆、終わりに見えるものを経験し、それを新たな始まりにすることを選択することができます。滝から奇跡的に生還したティナのように、ショーが2012年に放送終了するまで、ティナとコードは離婚しましたが、3回再婚しました。

だから覚えておいてください。あなたの体に息がある限り、物語を変えるのに遅すぎることはありません。ありがとう。

コメント

タイトルとURLをコピーしました