死後の選択肢!動物に食べられる「エクスポージャー葬」とは?

文化

Here’s a question we all have to answer sooner or later: What do you want to happen to your body when you die? Mortician and funeral director Caitlin Doughty explores new ways to prepare us for inevitable mortality. In this thoughtful talk, learn more about ideas for burial (like “recomposting” and “conservation burial”) that return our bodies back to the earth in an eco-friendly, humble and self-aware way.

これは私たち全員が遅かれ早かれ答えなければならない質問です:あなたは死んだら自分の体にどうなって欲しいですか?

葬儀屋で葬儀ディレクターのケイトリン・ドーティは、避けられない死に対して私たちを備えるための新しい方法を模索しています。 この思慮深い講演では、環境に優しく、謙虚で自覚的な方法で私たちの遺体を土に戻す埋葬のアイデア(「再堆肥化」や「保全埋葬」など)について詳しく学びます。

タイトル
A burial practice that nourishes the planet
地球に栄養を与える埋葬習慣
スピーカー ケイトリン・ドーティ
アップロード 2017/04/04

「地球に栄養を与える埋葬習慣(A burial practice that nourishes the planet)」の文字起こし

When I die, I would like for my body to be laid out to be eaten by animals. Having your body laid out to be eaten by animals is not for everyone.
Maybe you have already had the end-of-life talk with your family and decided on, I don’t know, cremation. And in the interest of full disclosure, what I am proposing for my dead body is not strictly legal at the moment, but it’s not without precedent. We’ve been laying out our dead for all of human history; it’s call exposure burial. In fact, it’s likely happening right now as we speak. In the mountainous regions of Tibet, they practice “sky burial,” a ritual where the body is left to be consumed by vultures. In Mumbai, in India, those who follow the Parsi religion put their dead in structures called “Towers of Silence.” These are interesting cultural tidbits, but they just haven’t really been that popular in the Western world ? they’re not what you’d expect.

In America, our death traditions have come to be chemical embalming, followed by burial at your local cemetery, or, more recently, cremation. I myself, am a recent vegetarian, which means I spent the first 30 years or so of my life frantically inhaling animals ? as many as I could get my hands on. Why, when I die, should they not have their turn with me?
Am I not an animal? Biologically speaking, are we not all, in this room, animals? Accepting the fact that we are animals has some potentially terrifying consequences. It means accepting that we are doomed to decay and die, just like any other creature on earth.

For the last nine years, I’ve worked in the funeral industry, first as a crematory operator, then as a mortician and most recently, as the owner of my own funeral home. And I have some good news: if you’re looking to avoid the whole “doomed to decay and die” thing: you will have all the help in the world in that avoidance from the funeral industry. It’s a multi-billion-dollar industry, and its economic model is based on the principle of protection, sanitation and beautification of the corpse. Whether they mean to or not, the funeral industry promotes this idea of human exceptionalism. It doesn’t matter what it takes, how much it costs, how bad it is for the environment, we’re going to do it because humans are worth it! It ignores the fact that death can be an emotionally messy and complex affair, and that there is beauty in decay ? beauty in the natural return to the earth from whence we came.

Now, I don’t want you to get me wrong ? I absolutely understand the importance of ritual, especially when it comes to the people that we love. But we have to be able to create and practice this ritual without harming the environment, which is why we need new options. So let’s return to the idea of protection, sanitation and beautification. We’ll start with a dead body. The funeral industry will protect your dead body by offering to sell your family a casket made of hardwood or metal with a rubber sealant. At the cemetery, on the day of burial, that casket will be lowered into a large concrete or metal vault. We’re wasting all of these resources ? concretes, metal, hardwoods ? hiding them in vast underground fortresses. When you choose burial at the cemetery, your dead body is not coming anywhere near the dirt that surrounds it. Food for worms you are not.

Next, the industry will sanitize your body through embalming: the chemical preservation of the dead. This procedure drains your blood and replaces it with a toxic, cancer-causing formaldehyde. They say they do this for the public health because the dead body can be dangerous, but the doctors in this room will tell you that that claim would only apply if the person had died of some wildly infectious disease, like Ebola. Even human decomposition, which, let’s be honest, is a little stinky and unpleasant, is perfectly safe. The bacteria that causes disease is not the same bacteria that causes decomposition.

Finally, the industry will beautify the corpse. They’ll tell you that the natural dead body of your mother or father is not good enough as it is. They’ll put it in makeup. They’ll put it in a suit. They’ll inject dyes so the person looks a little more alive ? just resting.

Embalming is a cheat code, providing the illusion that death and then decay are not the natural end for all organic life on this planet. Now, if this system of beautification, sanitation, protection doesn’t appeal to you, you are not alone. There is a whole wave of people ? funeral directors, designers, environmentalists ? trying to come up with a more eco-friendly way of death. For these people, death is not necessarily a pristine, makeup, powder-blue tuxedo kind of affair.

There’s no question that our current methods of death are not particularly sustainable, what with the waste of resources and our reliance on chemicals. Even cremation, which is usually considered the environmentally friendly option, uses, per cremation, the natural gas equivalent of a 500-mile car trip. So where do we go from here? Last summer, I was in the mountains of North Carolina, hauling buckets of wood chips in the summer sun. I was at Western Carolina University at their “Body Farm,” more accurately called a “human decomposition facility.” Bodies donated to science are brought here, and their decay is studied to benefit the future of forensics. On this particular day, there were 12 bodies laid out in various stages of decomposition. Some were skeletonized, one was wearing purple pajamas, one still had blonde facial hair visible. The forensic aspect is really fascinating, but not actually why I was there. I was there because a colleague of mine named Katrina Spade is attempting to create a system, not of cremating the dead, but composting the dead. She calls the system “Recomposition,” and we’ve been doing it with cattle and other livestock for years. She imagines a facility where the family could come and lay their dead loved one in a nutrient-rich mixture that would, in four-to-six weeks, reduce the body ? bones and all ? to soil. In those four-to-six weeks, your molecules become other molecules; you literally transform.

How would this fit in with the very recent desire a lot of people seem to have to be buried under a tree, or to become a tree when they die? In a traditional cremation, the ashes that are left over ? inorganic bone fragments ? form a thick, chalky layer that, unless distributed in the soil just right, can actually hurt or kill the tree. But if you’re recomposed, if you actually become the soil, you can nourish the tree, and become the post-mortem contributor you’ve always wanted to be ? that you deserve to be. So that’s one option for the future of cremation. But what about the future of cemeteries? There are a lot of people who think we shouldn’t even have cemeteries anymore because we’re running out of land. But what if we reframed it, and the corpse wasn’t the land’s enemy, but its potential savior?

I’m talking about conservation burial, where large swaths of land are purchased by a land trust. The beauty of this is that once you plant a few dead bodies in that land, it can’t be touched, it can’t be developed on ? hence the term, “conservation burial.” It’s the equivalent of chaining yourself to a tree post-mortem ? “Hell no, I won’t go! No, really ? I can’t. I’m decomposing under here.”
Any money that the family gives to the cemetery would go back into protecting and managing the land. There are no headstones and no graves in the typical sense. The graves are scattered about the property under elegant mounds, marked only by a rock or a small metal disk, or sometimes only locatable by GPS.

There’s no embalming, no heavy, metal caskets. My funeral home sells a few caskets made out of things like woven willow and bamboo, but honestly, most of our families just choose a simple shroud. There are none of the big vaults that most cemeteries require just because it makes it easier for them to landscape. Families can come here; they can luxuriate in nature; they can even plant a tree or a shrub, though only native plants to the area are allowed. The dead then blend seamlessly in with the landscape. There’s hope in conservation cemeteries. They offer dedicated green space in both urban and rural areas. They offer a chance to reintroduce native plants and animals to a region. They offer public trails, places for spiritual practice, places for classes and events ? places where nature and mourning meet. Most importantly, they offer us, once again, a chance to just decompose in a hole in the ground.

The soil, let me tell you, has missed us. I think for a lot of people, they’re starting to get the sense that our current funeral industry isn’t really working for them. For many of us, being sanitized and beautified just doesn’t reflect us. It doesn’t reflect what we stood for during our lives. Will changing the way we bury our dead solve climate change? No. But it will make bold moves in how we see ourselves as citizens of this planet. If we can die in a way that is more humble and self-aware, I believe that we stand a chance. Thank you.

「地球に栄養を与える埋葬習慣(A burial practice that nourishes the planet)」の和訳

私が死んだら、私の体を動物に食べさせてほしいです。自分の体を動物に食べさせることは、誰にでも向いているわけではありません。
もしかしたら、すでに家族と最期の話し合いをして、火葬などを決めたかもしれません。そして、正直に言うと、私が死んだ後の私の提案は現時点では厳密に法的には認められていませんが、それは先例がないわけではありません。私たちは人類史のすべての時代で死者を露出埋葬してきました。実際、私たちが話している今、それが行われている可能性が高いです。チベットの山岳地帯では、「天空葬」という儀式が行われ、死体がハゲワシに食べられるようにされます。インドのムンバイでは、パルシー教を信仰する人々が「沈黙の塔」と呼ばれる構造物に死者を置きます。これらは興味深い文化的な情報ですが、西洋ではあまり人気がありません。予想外のものです。

アメリカでは、私たちの死に関する伝統は、化学の防腐処理を受けた後、地元の墓地での埋葬、または最近では火葬となっています。私自身、最近は菜食主義者です。つまり、私は生まれてから約30年間、慌ただしく動物を吸い込んでいました。なぜ私が死んだら、彼らが私にもその番を持たないのでしょうか?
私たちは動物ではありませんか?生物学的に言えば、私たちこの部屋にいる全員が動物ではありませんか?私たちが動物であることを受け入れることには、いくつかの潜在的に恐ろしい結果があります。それは、私たちが地球上の他のどの生物と同様に、腐敗して死ぬ運命にあるということを受け入れることを意味します。

ここ9年間、私は葬儀業界で働いてきました。最初は火葬場のオペレーターとして、その後葬儀屋として、そして最近では自分の葬儀会社の経営者としてです。そして私には良いニュースがあります。もし「腐敗して死ぬ運命」を避けたいのであれば、葬儀業界からはその回避のための全ての助けを得ることができます。これは数十億ドル規模の産業であり、その経済モデルは遺体の保護、衛生、美化の原則に基づいています。彼らが意図しているかどうかは関係なく、葬儀業界は人間の特殊性という考えを推進しています。どれだけの費用や環境への悪影響があろうと、人間は価値があるのでそれを行う!というのがその姿勢です。しかし、死は感情的に乱雑で複雑なものであり、我々が土壌に戻る自然な過程には美しさがあることを無視しています。

私は誤解されたくありません。私は愛する人々にとって儀式の重要性を完全に理解しています。しかし、環境を損なわずにこの儀式を創造し実践する必要があります。そのためには新しい選択肢が必要です。では、保護、衛生、美化のアイデアに戻りましょう。まず、死体から始めましょう。葬儀業界は、家族に硬木や金属製の棺を販売することで死体を保護します。墓地では、埋葬の日にその棺は大きなコンクリートや金属のボールトに下ろされます。私たちはこれらのリソース、コンクリート、金属、硬材を無駄にして、広大な地下の要塞に隠しています。墓地での埋葬を選んだ場合、死体は周囲の土にはほとんど触れません。土壌の餌にはなりません。

次に、業界は死体の消毒を行います。それが化学的な防腐処理であるエンバーミングです。この手順では、血液を抜き取り、有毒でがんを引き起こすホルムアルデヒドで置き換えます。彼らはこれを公衆衛生のために行うと主張しますが、この主張はエボラなどの極めて感染性の高い病気で死亡した場合にのみ当てはまると、この場にいる医師たちが言うでしょう。人間の腐敗でさえ、ちょっと臭くて不快ではありますが、完全に安全です。病気を引き起こすバクテリアは腐敗を引き起こすバクテリアとは異なります。

最後に、業界は死体を美しくします。彼らは、あなたの母親や父親の自然な死体はそのままでは不十分だと言います。化粧をします。スーツを着せます。死体に少しでも生きているように見せるために染料を注入します。休んでいるように見せるのです。

エンバーミングは、死とその後の腐敗がこの惑星上のすべての有機生命の自然な終わりではないという幻想を提供するチートコードです。もしこの美化、消毒、保護のシステムがあなたに魅力的でない場合、あなただけではありません。葬儀ディレクターやデザイナー、環境保護主義者などの一連の人々が、より環境に優しい死の方法を考えようとしています。これらの人々にとって、死は必ずしも清潔な、化粧を施し、青いタキシードを着たようなものではありません。

現在の死の方法は、資源の浪費や化学物質への依存から考えて、特に持続可能とは言えません。一般的に環境に優しい選択肢とされる火葬でさえ、1回の火葬につき、500マイルの自動車旅行に相当する天然ガスを使用します。では、次にどう進めばよいでしょうか?去年の夏、私はノースカロライナの山々で、夏の日差しの中、木片をバケツに詰めていました。西カロライナ大学の「ボディファーム」と呼ばれる、より正確には「人間の腐敗施設」にいたのです。科学に寄付された遺体がここに持ち込まれ、彼らの腐敗が未来の法医学に役立つように研究されます。この特定の日には、様々な腐敗段階にある遺体が12体並べられていました。いくつかは骨格化され、1体は紫のパジャマを着ていましたし、1体はまだ金髪の顔毛が見えていました。法医学の側面は本当に魅力的ですが、実際のところ私がそこにいた理由ではありませんでした。私がそこにいたのは、私の同僚であるカトリーナ・スペードが、死者を焼却するのではなく、死者を堆肥化するシステムを作ろうとしているからです。彼女はそのシステムを「リコンポジション」と呼び、私たちは長年、牛やその他の家畜を使用しています。彼女は、家族が死者を栄養豊富な混合物に置くことができる施設を想像しています。4?6週間で、遺体は骨を含めて土に還元されます。その4?6週間で、あなたの分子は他の分子になります。文字通り、変わるのです。

これは、多くの人々が死んだ後に木の下に埋葬されたり、木になりたいと望む最近の欲求とどのように組み合わされるでしょうか?従来の火葬では、残される灰(無機性の骨片)は、適切に土壌に分配されない限り、木に害を及ぼすか、木を殺す可能性があります。しかし、もしリコンポーズされたら、あなたが実際に土になるので、木を育て、あなたがいつも望んでいた、そして当然のようになる死後の貢献者になることができます。したがって、これは火葬の未来の1つの選択肢です。しかし、墓地の未来はどうでしょうか?土地が不足しているため、墓地をもはや持つべきではないと考える人々がたくさんいます。しかし、もし我々がそれを再構成し、死体が土地の敵ではなくその潜在的な救世主であると考えなおしたらどうでしょうか?

私が話しているのは、保存埋葬です。土地信託によって広大な土地が購入されます。この美しい点は、その土地に数体の死体を埋め込んだら、それを触れることができなくなり、開発されなくなることです。そのため、「保存埋葬」という言葉が使われます。これは死後も木に自分自身を縛り付けるのと同等です。「いやだ、行かないで!」という意味ではなく、「本当に行けないんだ。ここで分解中だから」という意味です。

家族が墓地に支払うお金は、土地の保護と管理に戻ります。通常の意味での墓石や墓はありません。墓は、エレガントな丘の下に散在し、岩や小さな金属のディスクでのみマークされるか、場所によってはGPSでしか特定できません。

防腐処置もなければ、重い金属製の棺もありません。私の葬儀社では、ウィロー織りや竹などの材料で作られた数体の棺を販売していますが、正直なところ、ほとんどの家族はシンプルな寝巻を選びます。ほとんどの墓地が整地を容易にするために必要とする大きな地下室はありません。家族はここに来ることができます。自然を満喫することができます。木や低木を植えることさえできますが、地域の固有の植物のみが許可されています。その後、死者は風景にシームレスに溶け込みます。

保存墓地には希望があります。彼らは都市や地方の両方に専用の緑地を提供します。地域に固有の植物や動物を再導入する機会を提供します。公共のトレイル、精神的な実践の場、クラスやイベントの場を提供します。自然と喪の出会いの場所です。最も重要なことは、私たちが再び地面の穴で分解する機会を提供してくれることです。

土壌は、私たちを待ちわびていました。多くの人にとって、現在の葬儀業界がうまく機能していないという感覚が広がってきています。私たちを消毒し美化することは、多くの人にとって私たちを反映していないと感じられます。それは私たちの生涯で何を表現したかを反映していません。死者の埋葬方法を変えても、気候変動を解決するでしょうか?いいえ。しかし、それは私たちがこの惑星の市民として自己を見る方法に大胆な変化をもたらすでしょう。もし私たちがもっと謙虚で自己認識がある方法で死ぬことができれば、私は私たちにチャンスがあると信じています。ありがとう。

コメント

タイトルとURLをコピーしました