気候危機を乗り越えるための土壌管理

環境

There’s two times more carbon in the earth’s soil than in all of its vegetation and the atmosphere — combined. Biogeochemist Asmeret Asefaw Berhe dives into the science of soil and shares how we could use its awesome carbon-trapping power to offset climate change. “[Soil] represents the difference between life and lifelessness in the earth system, and it can also help us combat climate change — if we can only stop treating it like dirt,” she says.

地球の土壌には、すべての植物と大気を合わせた炭素の 2 倍の炭素が存在します。

生物地球化学者のアスメレット・アセファウ・バーヘ氏は、土壌の科学に深く入り込み、その驚異的な炭素捕捉力を気候変動を相殺するためにどのように利用できるかを共有します。 「(土壌は)地球システムにおける生命と無生命の違いを表しており、土壌を土のように扱うことをやめることさえできれば、気候変動と戦うのにも役立ちます」と彼女は言います。

タイトル
A climate change solution that’s right under our feet
私たちの足元にある気候変動ソリューション
スピーカー アスメレット・アセファウ・バーヘ
アップロード 2019/09/27

「私たちの足元にある気候変動ソリューション(A climate change solution that’s right under our feet)」の文字起こし

So one of the most important solutions to the global challenge posed by climate change lies right under our foot every day. It’s soil. Soil’s just the thin veil that covers the surface of land, but it has the power to shape our planet’s destiny. See, a six-foot or so of soil, loose soil material that covers the earth’s surface, represents the difference between life and lifelessness in the earth system, and it can also help us combat climate change if we can only stop treating it like dirt.

Climate change is happening, the earth’s atmosphere is warming, because of the increasing amount of greenhouse gases we keep releasing into the atmosphere. You all know that. But what I assume you might not have heard is that one of the most important things our human society could do to address climate change lies right there in the soil. I’m a soil scientist who has been studying soil since I was 18, because I’m interested in unlocking the secrets of soil and helping people understand this really important climate change solution.

So here are the facts about climate. The concentration of carbon dioxide in the earth’s atmosphere has increased by 40 percent just in the last 150 years or so. Human actions are now releasing 9.4 billion metric tons of carbon into the atmosphere, from activities such as burning fossil fuels and intensive agricultural practices, and other ways we change the way we use land, including deforestation. But the concentration of carbon dioxide that stays in the atmosphere is only increasing by about half of that, and that’s because half of the carbon we keep releasing into the atmosphere is currently being taken up by land and the seas through a process we know as carbon sequestration.

So in essence, whatever consequence you think we’re facing from climate change right now, we’re only experiencing the consequence of 50 percent of our pollution, because the natural ecosystems are bailing us out. But don’t get too comfortable, because we have two major things working against us right now. One: unless we do something big, and then fast, emissions will continue to rise. And second: the ability of these natural ecosystems to take up carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and sequester it in the natural habitats is currently getting compromised, as they’re experiencing serious degradation because of human actions. So it’s not entirely clear that we will continue to get bailed out by these natural ecosystems if we continue on this business-as-usual path that we’ve been.

Here’s where the soil comes in: there is about three thousand billion metric tons of carbon in the soil. That’s roughly about 315 times the amount of carbon that we release into the atmosphere currently. And there’s twice more carbon in soil than there is in vegetation and air. Think about that for a second. There’s more carbon in soil than there is in all of the world’s vegetation, including the lush tropical rainforests and the giant sequoias, the expansive grasslands, all of the cultivated systems, and every kind of flora you can imagine on the face of the earth, plus all the carbon that’s currently up in the atmosphere, combined, and then twice over. Hence, a very small change in the amount of carbon stored in soil can make a big difference in maintenance of the earth’s atmosphere.

But soil’s not just simply a storage box for carbon, though. It operates more like a bank account, and the amount of carbon that’s in soil at any given time is a function of the amount of carbon coming in and out of the soil. Carbon comes into the soil through the process of photosynthesis, when green plants take carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and use it to make their bodies, and upon death, their bodies enter the soil. And carbon leaves the soil and goes right back up into the atmosphere when the bodies of those formerly living organisms decay in soil by the activity of microbes. See, decomposition releases carbon dioxide into the atmosphere, as well as other greenhouse gases such as methane and nitrous oxide, but it also releases all the nutrients we all need to survive.

One of the things that makes soil such a fundamental component of any climate change mitigation strategy is because it represents a long-term storage of carbon. Carbon that would have lasted maybe a year or two in decaying residue if it was left on the surface can stay in soil for hundreds of years, even thousands and more. Soil biogeochemists like me study exactly how the soil system makes this possible, by locking away the carbon in physical association with minerals, inside aggregates of soil minerals, and formation of strong chemical bonds that bind the carbon to the surfaces of the minerals. See when carbon is entrapped in soil, in these kinds of associations with soil minerals, even the wiliest of the microbes can’t easily degrade it. And carbon that’s not degrading fast is carbon that’s not going back into the atmosphere as greenhouse gases.

But the benefit of carbon sequestration is not just limited to climate change mitigation. Soil that stores large amounts of carbon is healthy, fertile, soft. It’s malleable. It’s workable. It makes it like a sponge. It can hold on to a lot of water and nutrients. Healthy and fertile soils like this support the most dynamic, abundant and diverse habitat for living things that we know of anywhere on the earth system. It makes life possible for everything from the tiniest of the microbes, such as bacteria and fungi, all the way to higher plants, and fulfills the food, feed and fiber needs for all animals, including you and I.

So at this point, you would assume that we should be treating soil like the precious resource that it is. Unfortunately, that’s not the case. Soils around the world are experiencing unprecedented rates of degradation through a variety of human actions that include deforestation, intensive agricultural production systems, overgrazing, excessive application of agricultural chemicals, erosion and similar things. Half of the world’s soils are currently considered degraded. Soil degradation is bad for many reasons, but let me just tell you a couple. One: degraded soils have diminished potential to support plant productivity. And hence, by degrading soil, we’re compromising our own abilities to provide the food and other resources that we need for us and every member of living things on the face of the earth. And second: soil use and degradation, just in the last 200 years or so, has released 12 times more carbon into the atmosphere compared to the rate at which we’re releasing carbon into the atmosphere right now.

I’m afraid there’s even more bad news. This is a story of soils at high latitudes. Peatlands in polar environments store about a third of the global soil carbon reserves. These peatlands have a permanently frozen ground underneath, the permafrost, and the carbon was able to build up in these soils over long periods of time because even though plants are able to photosynthesize during the short, warm summer months, the environment quickly turns cold and dark, and then microbes are not able to efficiently break down the residue. So the soil carbon bank in these polar environments built up over hundreds of thousands of years. But right now, with atmospheric warming, the permafrost is thawing and draining. And when permafrost thaws and drains, it makes it possible for microbes to come in and rather quickly decompose all this carbon, with the potential to release hundreds of billions of metric tons of carbon into the atmosphere in the form of greenhouse gases.

And this release of additional greenhouse gases into the atmosphere will only contribute to further warming that makes this predicament even worse, as it starts a self-reinforcing positive feedback loop that could go on and on and on, dramatically changing our climate future. Fortunately, I can also tell you that there is a solution for these two wicked problems of soil degradation and climate change. Just like we created these problems, we do know the solution, and the solution lies in simultaneously working to address these two things together, through what we call climate-smart land management practices.

What do I mean here? I mean managing land in a way that’s smart about maximizing how much carbon we store in soil. And we can accomplish this by putting in place deep-rooted perennial plants, putting back forests whenever possible, reducing tillage and other disturbances from agricultural practices, including optimizing the use of agricultural chemicals and grazing, and even adding carbon to soil, whenever possible, from recycled resources such as compost and even human waste. This kind of land stewardship is not a radical idea. It’s what made it possible for fertile soils to be able to support human civilizations since time immemorial.

In fact, some are doing it just right now. There’s a global effort underway to accomplish exactly this goal. This effort that started in France is known as the “4 per 1000” effort, and it sets an aspirational goal to increase the amount of carbon stored in soil by 0.4 percent annually, using the same kind of climate-smart land management practices I mentioned earlier. And if this effort’s fully successful, it can offset a third of the global emissions of fossil-fuel-derived carbon into the atmosphere. But even if this effort is not fully successful, but we just start heading in that direction, we still end up with soils that are healthier, more fertile, are able to produce all the food and resources that we need for human populations and more, and also soils that are better capable of sequestering carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and helping with climate change mitigation. I’m pretty sure that’s what politicians call a win-win solution.

And we all can have a role to play here. We can start by treating the soil with the respect that it deserves: respect for its ability as the basis of all life on earth, respect for its ability to serve as a carbon bank and respect for its ability to control our climate. And if we do so, we can then simultaneously address two of the most pressing global challenges of our time: climate change and soil degradation. And in the process, we would be able to provide food and nutritional security to our growing human family. Thank you.

「私たちの足元にある気候変動ソリューション(A climate change solution that’s right under our feet)」の和訳

気候変動によって引き起こされる世界的な課題に対する最も重要な解決策の1つは、私たちの足元に毎日広がっているのです。それは土壌です。土壌は地表を覆う薄いベールにすぎませんが、地球の運命を形作る力を持っています。実際、地球表面を覆う約6フィートほどの土壌は、地球システムにおける生命と生命の無い状態の違いを表しており、私たちがただ「土」として扱うのをやめることができれば、気候変動と戦う手助けとなる可能性があります。

気候変動は進行中であり、地球の大気が温暖化しています。その原因は、私たちが大気中に放出し続けている温室効果ガスの量が増加しているためです。これは皆さんもご存知のことでしょう。しかし、あなたがたが聞いたことがないと思われるのは、気候変動に対処するために人類社会ができる最も重要なことの1つが、まさにそこに土壌にあるということです。私は18歳の頃から土壌を研究してきた土壌科学者です。土壌の秘密を解き明かし、この本当に重要な気候変動の解決策を人々に理解してもらいたいと思っています。

では、気候に関する事実をご紹介しましょう。地球の大気中の二酸化炭素濃度は、たった150年ほどで40%も増加しました。現在、人間の活動によって、化石燃料の燃焼や集約的な農業活動などの活動から、大気中に94億トンの炭素が放出されています。また、森林伐採を含む土地利用の変化など、私たちが地球を利用する方法も影響しています。しかし、大気中に残存する二酸化炭素濃度は、放出された炭素の半分程度しか増加していません。それは、私たちが大気中に放出し続ける炭素の半分が現在、炭素固定として土地や海に吸収されているためです。

要するに、現在私たちが気候変動から直面している結果は、私たちの汚染物質の50%の結果しか経験していないということです。なぜなら、自然生態系が私たちを救済しているからです。しかし、あまり安心してはいけません。なぜなら、現在私たちには2つの大きな問題があるからです。第一に、何か大きなことをすぐにしない限り、排出量は増加し続けます。そして第二に、これらの自然生態系が大気中の二酸化炭素を取り込んで自然の生息地に固定する能力が、人間の活動によって深刻な損傷を受けているため、現在危機に瀕しています。したがって、もし私たちがこれまでの通常のビジネスアスユージュアルの道を進み続けるなら、これらの自然生態系によって救済され続けるかどうかは完全に明確ではありません。

ここで土壌が重要な役割を果たします。土壌には約3000億トンの炭素が含まれています。現在大気中に放出している炭素のおおよそ315倍に相当します。そして、土壌中の炭素は植生や大気中の炭素の2倍あります。ほんの数秒考えてみてください。土壌中には、世界中の植生全体、美しい熱帯雨林や巨大なセコイア、広大な草原、すべての栽培システム、地球上で想像できるすべての種類の植物、そして現在大気中にある炭素がすべて含まれており、それらが2倍あります。したがって、土壌中に蓄積される炭素量のわずかな変化が、地球の大気の維持に大きな影響を与える可能性があります。

しかし、土壌は単なる炭素の貯蔵庫ではありません。土壌はむしろ銀行口座のように機能し、任意の時点での土壌中の炭素量は土壌に出入りする炭素量の関数です。炭素は光合成のプロセスを通じて土壌に入ります。これは、緑色の植物が大気中の二酸化炭素を取り込んで体を作るために使用するものです。そして、これらの植物が死ぬと、彼らの体は土壌に入ります。そして、以前に生きていた生物の体が微生物の活動によって土壌内で腐敗すると、炭素は土壌から大気に戻ります。分解は、二酸化炭素やメタン、亜酸化窒素などの温室効果ガスを大気中に放出する一方で、私たちが生存するために必要な栄養素をすべて放出します。

土壌を気候変動緩和戦略の基本的な構成要素とするものの一つは、それが炭素の長期的な貯蔵を表していることです。土壌表面に放置されていれば1?2年で分解される炭素でも、土壌中に入ると何百年、何千年と保持されることがあります。私のような土壌生物地球化学者は、土壌システムがこれを可能にする方法を正確に研究しています。それは、炭素を鉱物と物理的に関連付けたり、土壌鉱物の凝集体の内部に閉じ込めたり、炭素を鉱物表面に結合する強力な化学結合を形成したりすることによって行われます。炭素が土壌中でこのような関連性で閉じ込められると、最も狡猾な微生物でも簡単に分解することはできません。そして、急速に分解されない炭素は、温室効果ガスとして大気に戻らない炭素です。

しかし、炭素固定の利点は気候変動の緩和に限定されるわけではありません。大量の炭素を貯蔵する土壌は、健康で肥沃で柔らかいです。形を変えることができます。使いやすいです。それはスポンジのようです。多くの水と栄養素を保持することができます。このような健康で肥沃な土壌は、地球システムのどこよりも生き物の最もダイナミックで豊かで多様な生息地を支えています。微生物、細菌、菌類などの最小の生物から高等植物まで、すべての生物の食料、飼料、繊維の必要性を満たし、地球上のすべての生物の生命を可能にします。

したがって、この時点で、私たちは土壌をその持つ貴重な資源と同じように扱うべきだと思うでしょう。残念ながら、そうではありません。世界中の土壌は、森林伐採、集約的な農業生産システム、過放牧、農薬の過剰な使用、侵食など、さまざまな人為的活動によって、前例のない速度で劣化しています。世界の土壌の半分が現在、劣化していると見なされています。土壌の劣化は多くの理由で悪いですが、いくつかをご説明します。第一に、劣化した土壌は植物生産性を支援する可能性が低下しています。したがって、土壌を劣化させることで、私たちは地球上のすべての生物の食料や他の資源を提供する能力を損なっています。そして第二に、過去200年ほどの土壌の使用と劣化により、現在の大気中に炭素が放出される速度と比較して、12倍もの炭素が大気中に放出されています。

残念ながら、さらに悪いニュースがあります。これは高緯度地域の土壌の物語です。極地の湿原は、地球の土壌炭素埋蔵量の約三分の一を保持しています。これらの湿原には永久に凍った地下、永久凍土があり、植物が短い暖かい夏の数か月に光合成を行うことができるとしても、環境がすぐに寒くて暗くなり、その後微生物は残留物を効率的に分解することができません。そのため、これらの極地環境の土壌炭素バンクは何十万年もの間、積み重ねられてきました。しかし、現在、大気の温暖化により永久凍土が解凍されて排水されています。永久凍土が解凍されて排水されると、微生物が入り込んでこの炭素を非常に速く分解することが可能になり、数千億トンの炭素が温室効果ガスの形で大気中に放出される可能性があります。

さらに、大気中への追加の温室効果ガスの放出は、この状況をさらに悪化させるだけでなく、これが自己増強的な正のフィードバックループを開始し、気候の未来を劇的に変える可能性があるため、この問題をさらに悪化させます。幸いなことに、土壌劣化と気候変動のこの二つの悪い問題には解決策があります。私たちがこれらの問題を作り出したように、私たちは解決策を知っています。そして解決策は、気候スマートな土地管理の実践を通じて、これらの二つの問題を同時に解決することにあります。

ここで言っているのは、土壌に貯蔵される炭素量を最大化することに賢明な方法で土地を管理することです。そして、私たちは、深根性の多年生植物を植えたり、可能な限り森林を復元したり、農業慣行からの耕作やその他の擾乱を減らしたり、農薬や放牧の使用を最適化したり、可能な限り土壌に炭素を添加したりすることで、これを実現することができます。この種の土地管理は、革新的なアイデアではありません。これは、古代から肥沃な土壌が人類の文明を支えることを可能にしたものです。

実際、今、何人かがそれを実行しています。この目標を達成するための世界的な取り組みが進行中です。フランスで始まったこの取り組みは、「4‰イニシアティブ」として知られ、私が先ほど言及した気候スマートな土地管理慣行を使用して、土壌中に貯蔵される炭素量を年間0.4%増やすという目標を掲げています。そして、この取り組みが完全に成功すれば、大気中に排出される化石燃料由来の炭素の三分の一を相殺することができます。しかし、この取り組みが完全に成功しない場合でも、その方向に進み始めれば、私たちは依然としてより健康で肥沃な土壌を手に入れ、人類の人口を含むすべての食料と資源を生産できるだけでなく、大気中の二酸化炭素を固定し、気候変動の緩和に貢献することができます。これが政治家がウィンウィンの解決策と呼ぶものだと私は確信しています。

そして、私たち全員がここで役割を果たすことができます。まず、土壌に対してそれが受けるべき尊敬を示すことから始めることができます:地球上のすべての生命の基盤としてのその能力への尊敬、炭素バンクとしてのその能力への尊敬、そして私たちの気候を制御するその能力への尊敬です。そして、そうすれば、同時に、気候変動と土壌劣化という現代の最も重要な世界的な課題の二つに取り組むことができます。その過程で、私たちは成長する人間の家族に食料と栄養の安全保障を提供することができるでしょう。ありがとう。

コメント

タイトルとURLをコピーしました