2050年までに9億人の食糧危機をどう解決するか?214兆カロリーの挑戦

環境

Sara Menker quit a career in commodities trading to figure out how the global value chain of agriculture works. Her discoveries have led to some startling predictions: “We could have a tipping point in global food and agriculture if surging demand surpasses the agricultural system’s structural capacity to produce food,” she says. “People could starve and governments may fall.” Menker’s models predict that this scenario could happen in a decade — that the world could be short 214 trillion calories per year by 2027. She offers a vision of this impossible world as well as some steps we can take today to avoid it.

サラ・メンカーは商品取引のキャリアを辞めて、農業のグローバルな価値連鎖がどのように機能するかを理解しようとしました。彼女の発見はいくつかの驚くべき予測につながりました。

「需要の急増が農業システムの構造的な生産能力を上回れば、世界の食料と農業についての転換点を迎える可能性があります」と彼女は言います。「人々が飢え、政府が崩壊するかもしれません。」メンカーのモデルは、このシナリオが10年以内に起こる可能性があると予測しています。つまり、2027年までに世界は年間214兆カロリーの食料が不足する可能性があります。

彼女はこのあり得ない世界のビジョンを提示し、それを回避するために今日私たちが取るべきいくつかの手順も提案しています。

タイトル
A global food crisis may be less than a decade away
世界的な食糧危機は10 年以内に起こる可能性があります
スピーカー サラ・メンカー
アップロード 2017/10/27

「世界的な食糧危機は 10 年以内に起こる可能性があります(A global food crisis may be less than a decade away)」の文字起こし

Since 2009, the world has been stuck on a single narrative around a coming global food crisis and what we need to do to avoid it. How do we feed nine billion people by 2050? Every conference, podcast and dialogue around global food security starts with this question and goes on to answer it by saying we need to produce 70 percent more food. The 2050 narrative started to evolve shortly after global food prices hit all-time highs in 2008. People were suffering and struggling, governments and world leaders needed to show us that they were paying attention and were working to solve it. The thing is, 2050 is so far into the future that we can’t even relate to it, and more importantly, if we keep doing what we’re doing, it’s going to hit us a lot sooner than that.

I believe we need to ask a different question. The answer to that question needs to be framed differently. If we can reframe the old narrative and replace it with new numbers that tell us a more complete pictures, numbers that everyone can understand and relate to, we can avoid the crisis altogether.

I was a commodities trader in my past life and one of the things that I learned trading is that every market has a tipping point, the point at which change occurs so rapidly that it impacts the world and things change forever. Think of the last financial crisis, or the dot-com crash.

So here’s my concern. We could have a tipping point in global food and agriculture if surging demand surpasses the agricultural system’s structural capacity to produce food. This means at this point supply can no longer keep up with demand despite exploding prices, unless we can commit to some type of structural change. This time around, it won’t be about stock markets and money. It’s about people. People could starve and governments may fall.

This question of at what point does supply struggle to keep up with surging demand is one that started off as an interest for me while I was trading and became an absolute obsession. It went from interest to obsession when I realized through my research how broken the system was and how very little data was being used to make such critical decisions. That’s the point I decided to walk away from a career on Wall Street and start an entrepreneurial journey to start Gro Intelligence.

At Gro, we focus on bringing this data and doing the work to make it actionable, to empower decision-makers at every level. But doing this work, we also realized that the world, not just world leaders, but businesses and citizens like every single person in this room, lacked an actionable guide on how we can avoid a coming global food security crisis. And so we built a model, leveraging the petabytes of data we sit on, and we solved for the tipping point.

Now, no one knows we’ve been working on this problem and this is the first time that I’m sharing what we discovered. We discovered that the tipping point is actually a decade from now. We discovered that the world will be short 214 trillion calories by 2027.

The world is not in a position to fill this gap. Now, you’ll notice that the way I’m framing this is different from how I started, and that’s intentional, because until now this problem has been quantified using mass: think kilograms, tons, hectograms, whatever your unit of choice is in mass. Why do we talk about food in terms of weight? Because it’s easy. We can look at a photograph and determine tonnage on a ship by using a simple pocket calculator. We can weigh trucks, airplanes and oxcarts. But what we care about in food is nutritional value. Not all foods are created equal, even if they weigh the same. This I learned firsthand when I moved from Ethiopia to the US for university. Upon my return back home, my father, who was so excited to see me, greeted me by asking why I was fat. Now, turns out that eating approximately the same amount of food as I did in Ethiopia, but in America, had actually lent a certain fullness to my figure. This is why we should care about calories, not about mass. It is calories which sustain us.

So 214 trillion calories is a very large number, and not even the most dedicated of us think in the hundreds of trillions of calories. So let me break this down differently. An alternative way to think about this is to think about it in Big Macs. 214 trillion calories. A single Big Mac has 563 calories. That means the world will be short 379 billion Big Macs in 2027. That is more Big Macs than McDonald’s has ever produced.

So how did we get to these numbers in the first place? They’re not made up. This map shows you where the world was 40 years ago. It shows you net calorie gaps in every country in the world. Now, simply put, this is just calories consumed in that country minus calories produced in that same country. This is not a statement on malnutrition or anything else. It’s simply saying how many calories are consumed in a single year minus how many are produced. Blue countries are net calorie exporters, or self-sufficient. They have some in storage for a rainy day. Red countries are net calorie importers. The deeper, the brighter the red, the more you’re importing.

40 years ago, such few countries were net exporters of calories, I could count them with one hand. Most of the African continent, Europe, most of Asia, South America excluding Argentina, were all net importers of calories. And what’s surprising is that China used to actually be food self-sufficient. India was a big net importer of calories. 40 years later, this is today. You can see the drastic transformation that’s occurred in the world. Brazil has emerged as an agricultural powerhouse. Europe is dominant in global agriculture. India has actually flipped from red to blue. It’s become food self-sufficient. And China went from that light blue to the brightest red that you see on this map.

How did we get here? What happened? So this chart shows you India and Africa. Blue line is India, red line is Africa. How is it that two regions that started off so similarly in such similar trajectories take such different paths? India had a green revolution. Not a single African country had a green revolution. The net outcome? India is food self-sufficient and in the past decade has actually been exporting calories. The African continent now imports over 300 trillion calories a year.

Then we add China, the green line. Remember the switch from the blue to the bright red? What happened and when did it happen? China seemed to be on a very similar path to India until the start of the 21st century, where it suddenly flipped. A young and growing population combined with significant economic growth made its mark with a big bang and no one in the markets saw it coming. This flip was everything to global agricultural markets. Luckily now, South America was starting to boom at the same time as China’s rise, and so therefore, supply and demand were still somewhat balanced.

So the question becomes, where do we go from here? Oddly enough, it’s not a new story, except this time it’s not just a story of China. It’s a continuation of China, an amplification of Africa and a paradigm shift in India. By 2023, Africa’s population is forecasted to overtake that of India’s and China’s. By 2023, these three regions combined will make up over half the world’s population. This crossover point starts to present really interesting challenges for global food security. And a few years later, we’re hit hard with that reality.

What does the world look like in 10 years? So far, as I mentioned, India has been food self-sufficient. Most forecasters predict that this will continue. We disagree. India will soon become a net importer of calories. This will be driven both by the fact that demand is growing from a population growth standpoint plus economic growth. It will be driven by both. And even if you have optimistic assumptions around production growth, it will make that slight flip. That slight flip can have huge implications.

Next, Africa will continue to be a net importer of calories, again driven by population growth and economic growth. This is again assuming optimistic production growth assumptions. Then China, where population is flattening out, calorie consumption will explode because the types of calories consumed are also starting to be higher-calorie-content foods. And so therefore, these three regions combined start to present a really interesting challenge for the world.

Until now, countries with calorie deficits have been able to meet these deficits by importing from surplus regions. By surplus regions, I’m talking about North America, South America and Europe. This line chart over here shows you the growth and the projected growth over the next decade of production from North America, South America and Europe. What it doesn’t show you is that most of this growth is actually going to come from South America. And most of this growth is going to come at the huge cost of deforestation. And so when you look at the combined demand increase coming from India, China and the African continent, and look at it versus the combined increase in production coming from India, China, the African continent, North America, South America and Europe, you are left with a 214-trillion-calorie deficit, one we can’t produce. And this, by the way, is actually assuming we take all the extra calories produced in North America, South America and Europe and export them solely to India, China and Africa.

What I just presented to you is a vision of an impossible world. We can do something to change that. We can change consumption patterns, we can reduce food waste, or we can make a bold commitment to increasing yields exponentially. Now, I’m not going to go into discussing changing consumption patterns or reducing food waste, because those conversations have been going on for some time now. Nothing has happened. Nothing has happened because those arguments ask the surplus regions to change their behavior on behalf of deficit regions. Waiting for others to change their behavior on your behalf, for your survival, is a terrible idea. It’s unproductive.

So I’d like to suggest an alternative that comes from the red regions. China, India, Africa. China is constrained in terms of how much more land it actually has available for agriculture, and it has massive water resource availability issues. So the answer really lies in India and in Africa. India has some upside in terms of potential yield increases. Now this is the gap between its current yield and the theoretical maximum yield it can achieve. It has some unfarmed arable land remaining, but not much, India is quite land-constrained. Now, the African continent, on the other hand, has vast amounts of arable land remaining and significant upside potential in yields. Somewhat simplified picture here, but if you look at sub-Saharan African yields in corn today, they are where North American yields were in 1940. We don’t have 70-plus years to figure this out, so it means we need to try something new and we need to try something different.

The solution starts with reforms. We need to reform and commercialize the agricultural industries in Africa and in India. Now, by commercialization — commercialization is not about commercial farming alone. Commercialization is about leveraging data to craft better policies, to improve infrastructure, to lower the transportation costs and to completely reform banking and insurance industries. Commercialization is about taking agriculture from too risky an endeavor to one where fortunes can be made. Commercialization is not about just farmers. Commercialization is about the entire agricultural system. But commercialization also means confronting the fact that we can no longer place the burden of growth on small-scale farmers alone, and accepting that commercial farms and the introduction of commercial farms could provide certain economies of scale that even small-scale farmers can leverage. It is not about small-scale farming or commercial agriculture, or big agriculture. We can create the first successful models of the coexistence and success of small-scale farming alongside commercial agriculture. This is because, for the first time ever, the most critical tool for success in the industry — data and knowledge — is becoming cheaper by the day. And very soon, it won’t matter how much money you have or how big you are to make optimal decisions and maximize probability of success in reaching your intended goal. Companies like Gro are working really hard to make this a reality.

So if we can commit to this new, bold initiative, to this new, bold change, not only can we solve the 214-trillion gap that I talked about, but we can actually set the world on a whole new path. India can remain food self-sufficient and Africa can emerge as the world’s next dark blue region. The new question is, how do we produce 214 trillion calories to feed 8.3 billion people by 2027? We have the solution. We just need to act on it. Thank you.

「世界的な食糧危機は 10 年以内に起こる可能性があります(A global food crisis may be less than a decade away)」の和訳

2009年以降、世界は一つの物語にとらわれています。それは、来るべき世界的な食料危機と、それを回避するために何をするべきかということです。2050年までに90億人をどうやって養うか?これはすべての会議、ポッドキャスト、そして世界の食料安全保障に関する対話がこの質問から始まり、それに対する答えとして「70%の食料生産増加が必要だ」と言うのです。2050年の物語は、2008年に世界的な食料価格が過去最高に達した直後に発展し始めました。人々は苦しみ、政府や世界のリーダーたちは、彼らがこの問題に注意を払い、解決に向けて取り組んでいることを示さなければなりませんでした。しかし、問題は、2050年は私たちにとって非常に遠い未来であり、もっと重要なことに、もし私たちが今のままのやり方を続ければ、その危機はもっと早く私たちに襲いかかるということです。

私は、異なる質問をする必要があると考えています。その質問に対する答えは、異なる枠組みで提示する必要があります。もし古い物語を再構築し、新しい数字で私たちにより完全な絵を描き出すことができれば、その数字は誰もが理解し共感できるものであり、危機を回避することができるのです。

私はかつてコモディティトレーダーをしていましたが、トレーディングで学んだことの一つは、すべての市場には転換点があるということです。その点では変化が急速に起こり、世界に影響を与え、物事が永遠に変わるのです。例えば、最後の金融危機やドットコムバブルの崩壊を思い出してください。

そこで私の懸念をお話しします。もし需要の急増が農業システムの構造的な食料生産能力を超えた場合、世界の食料と農業には転換点が訪れるかもしれません。つまり、供給が需要に追いつかなくなり、価格が急騰しても食料を提供できなくなるのです。これを回避するためには、何らかの構造的な変革にコミットする必要があります。今回は、株式市場やお金の問題ではありません。それは人々の問題です。人々は飢え、政府は崩壊するかもしれません。

この供給が急増する需要に追いつけなくなる点がどこにあるのかという問題は、私がトレーダーをしている間に興味を持ち始め、その後完全な執念へと変わりました。私の研究を通じてシステムの破綻ぶりと、重大な決定を行うためにほとんどデータが使われていないことに気付いたとき、その興味が執念へと変わったのです。そこで私はウォール街でのキャリアを捨て、起業家としての道を歩む決意をし、Gro Intelligenceを立ち上げました。

Groでは、このデータを収集し、行動可能なものにすることで、あらゆるレベルの意思決定者に力を与えることに焦点を当てています。しかし、この仕事をしている中で、世界のリーダーだけでなく、この部屋にいる全ての人々のような企業や市民が、来るべき世界的な食料安全保障危機を回避するための具体的なガイドを欠いていることに気付きました。そこで私たちは、膨大なデータを活用し、転換点を解明するモデルを構築しました。

この問題に取り組んでいることは誰も知らず、今回が初めてその発見を共有する機会です。私たちの発見によると、転換点は実際には10年後に来るということです。2027年までに世界は214兆カロリーの不足に直面することになると分かりました。

世界はこのギャップを埋める準備ができていません。さて、私がこの問題を提示する方法が冒頭とは異なることにお気付きかと思いますが、これは意図的なものです。これまでこの問題は質量で定量化されてきました。キログラム、トン、ヘクトグラムなど、質量の単位で考えられてきました。なぜ食料を質量で語るのでしょうか?それは簡単だからです。写真を見てポケット電卓で船の積載量を計算することができますし、トラック、飛行機、牛車の重さを測ることもできます。しかし、私たちが食料において本当に気にするべきなのは栄養価です。同じ重さでも、すべての食料が同じ価値を持っているわけではありません。

これは私がエチオピアからアメリカの大学に移り住んだ時に身をもって学んだことです。帰国した際、父は私を見て興奮して「なぜ太ったのか?」と尋ねました。実際にはエチオピアで食べていた量とほぼ同じ量をアメリカで食べていたのに、アメリカの食べ物が私の体型に変化をもたらしたのです。だからこそ、私たちは質量ではなくカロリーに関心を持つべきです。私たちを支えるのはカロリーだからです。

214兆カロリーは非常に大きな数字であり、誰もが数百兆のカロリーを考えるわけではありません。そこで、別の方法で説明しましょう。214兆カロリーをビッグマックに換算して考えてみます。1個のビッグマックには563カロリーが含まれています。つまり、2027年には世界が3790億個のビッグマック不足に直面するということです。これはマクドナルドがこれまでに生産したビッグマックの数を上回ります。

では、そもそもこの数字はどうやって算出されたのでしょうか?これは架空の数字ではありません。この地図は40年前の世界の状況を示しています。各国の純カロリーギャップを示しているのです。簡単に言うと、これはその国で消費されたカロリーからその国で生産されたカロリーを引いたものです。これは栄養失調やその他の問題についての言及ではなく、単に一年間に消費されたカロリーから生産されたカロリーを引いたものです。青い国は純カロリー輸出国、または自給自足国であり、雨の日のために備蓄があります。赤い国は純カロリー輸入国であり、赤が深く明るいほど輸入量が多いことを示しています。

40年前、カロリーの純輸出国は数えるほどしかありませんでした。アフリカ大陸のほとんど、ヨーロッパ、アジアの大部分、アルゼンチンを除く南米はすべてカロリーの純輸入国でした。そして驚くべきことに、中国はかつて食料自給ができていました。インドはカロリーの大きな純輸入国でした。それが40年後、今日ではどうでしょうか。世界がどれだけ劇的に変化したかがわかります。ブラジルは農業大国に成長しました。ヨーロッパは世界の農業を支配しています。インドは赤から青に変わり、食料自給ができるようになりました。そして中国は淡い青から、この地図で見える最も鮮やかな赤に変わりました。

どうしてこんなことになったのでしょうか?何が起こったのでしょうか?このグラフはインドとアフリカを示しています。青い線がインド、赤い線がアフリカです。どうして同じような道を歩んでいた二つの地域がこんなにも違う道をたどったのでしょうか?インドは「緑の革命」を経験しましたが、アフリカの国々は一つも「緑の革命」を経験しませんでした。その結果、インドは食料自給ができるようになり、過去10年間ではカロリーを輸出するようにまでなりました。一方、アフリカ大陸は現在、年間300兆カロリー以上を輸入しています。

次に中国を加えてみましょう。緑の線が中国です。青から鮮やかな赤に変わったのを覚えていますか?何が起こったのでしょうか?いつそれが起こったのでしょうか?中国は21世紀の初めまでインドと非常に似た道を歩んでいましたが、そこから突然転換しました。若く成長する人口と著しい経済成長が一体となり、大きな影響を与えたのです。市場では誰もこの変化を予測していませんでした。この転換は世界の農業市場にとって非常に重要でした。幸運にも、同じ時期に南米が成長し始め、中国の台頭とともに供給と需要のバランスがなんとか保たれました。

では、ここからどう進むべきかという質問になります。奇妙なことに、これは新しい物語ではありません。今回は中国だけの話ではなく、中国の継続、アフリカの拡大、そしてインドのパラダイムシフトの物語です。2023年までに、アフリカの人口はインドと中国の人口を超えると予測されています。2023年には、これら3つの地域が世界の人口の半分以上を占めることになります。この転換点は、世界の食料安全保障に非常に興味深い課題を提示し始めます。そして数年後、その現実に直面することになります。

では、10年後の世界はどうなるでしょうか?これまで述べたように、インドは食料自給を維持してきました。多くの予測者はこれが続くと考えていますが、私たちは違います。インドはまもなくカロリーの純輸入国になるでしょう。これは人口増加と経済成長の両方によって引き起こされます。需要の増加がこの転換を促進し、たとえ生産成長に対して楽観的な見通しを持っていても、その転換は避けられません。そして、このわずかな転換が巨大な影響を及ぼす可能性があります。

次に、アフリカは引き続きカロリーの純輸入国であり続けるでしょう。これもまた人口増加と経済成長によって駆動されます。ここでも生産成長に対して楽観的な見通しを持っている場合の話です。そして、中国では人口は横ばいになる一方で、カロリー消費は急増します。消費されるカロリーの種類も高カロリーの食品に変わりつつあります。したがって、これら3つの地域が組み合わさることで、世界に非常に興味深い課題を提示します。

これまで、カロリー不足の国々は、余剰地域からの輸入で不足を補ってきました。余剰地域というのは、北米、南米、そしてヨーロッパのことです。この折れ線グラフは、北米、南米、ヨーロッパの生産の成長と今後10年間の予測成長を示しています。ただし、このグラフが示していないのは、この成長のほとんどが実際には南米から来るということです。そして、この成長の大部分は、巨額の森林破壊の代償を伴います。そして、インド、中国、アフリカ大陸からの需要増加と、インド、中国、アフリカ大陸、北米、南米、ヨーロッパからの生産増加を合わせて見ると、214兆カロリーの不足が残ります。これは生産できない量です。ちなみに、これは北米、南米、ヨーロッパで生産された余剰カロリーをすべてインド、中国、アフリカに輸出すると仮定しての話です。

私が今お見せしたのは、不可能な世界のビジョンです。しかし、これを変えることはできます。消費パターンを変えること、食品廃棄を減らすこと、あるいは収穫量を飛躍的に増やすための大胆な取り組みをすることが可能です。ここでは、消費パターンの変更や食品廃棄の削減については詳しく述べません。それらの議論は以前から行われていますが、何も変わっていません。何も変わっていないのは、その議論が余剰地域に対して、カロリー不足地域のために行動を変えるよう求めているからです。他人があなたのために行動を変えるのを待つこと、それであなたの生存を期待することは、非常に悪いアイデアです。非生産的なのです。

そこで、私は赤い地域からの別のアプローチを提案したいと思います。中国、インド、アフリカです。中国は農業に利用できる土地の余地が限られており、水資源の問題も深刻です。したがって、答えは実際にはインドとアフリカにあります。インドには潜在的な収量増加の余地があります。これは現在の収量と理論的に達成可能な最大収量との間のギャップです。未耕作の耕地も多少残っていますが、インドはかなり土地に制約があります。一方、アフリカ大陸には広大な耕作可能な土地が残っており、収量の大幅な向上が期待できます。簡略化した図ですが、現在のサブサハラアフリカのトウモロコシ収量は、1940年の北米の収量と同じです。我々には70年以上もかけてこれを解決する時間はありませんので、新しい方法、異なるアプローチを試す必要があります。

解決策は改革から始まります。アフリカとインドの農業産業を改革し、商業化する必要があります。商業化というのは、大規模農業だけの話ではありません。商業化とは、データを活用してより良い政策を策定し、インフラを改善し、輸送コストを下げ、銀行や保険業界を完全に改革することです。商業化とは、農業をリスクの高い事業から、成功の可能性が高い事業へと変えることです。商業化は農民だけの話ではなく、農業システム全体の話です。しかし、商業化は成長の負担を小規模農家だけに押し付けることはできないという事実に向き合うことでもあり、商業農場の導入が、小規模農家でも活用できる規模の経済を提供する可能性があることを受け入れることでもあります。小規模農業か商業農業か、大規模農業かという問題ではありません。小規模農業と商業農業が共存し、成功する最初のモデルを作り出すことができるのです。これは、業界で成功するための最も重要なツールであるデータと知識が日々安価になっているからです。そして、すぐに、どれだけの資金を持っているか、どれだけ大きいかに関係なく、最適な決定を下し、目標達成の成功確率を最大化することができるようになります。Groのような企業がこれを現実のものとするために一生懸命働いています。

したがって、もし私たちがこの新しい大胆なイニシアチブ、この新しい大胆な変化にコミットできれば、先ほどお話しした214兆カロリーのギャップを解消するだけでなく、世界をまったく新しい道に導くことができます。インドは引き続き食糧自給を維持し、アフリカは次の暗青色の地域として浮上することができます。新しい問いは、2027年までに83億人を養うために214兆カロリーをどのように生産するかということです。私たちにはその解決策があります。ただ、それを実行に移すだけです。ありがとうございました。

コメント

タイトルとURLをコピーしました