経済成長の終焉?豊かさを求める新たな視点とは

経済

What would a sustainable, universally beneficial economy look like? “Like a doughnut,” says Oxford economist Kate Raworth. In a stellar, eye-opening talk, she explains how we can move countries out of the hole — where people are falling short on life’s essentials — and create regenerative, distributive economies that work within the planet’s ecological limits.

持続可能で普遍的に有益な経済とはどのようなものでしょうか?

オックスフォード大学の経済学者ケイト・ロースが「ドーナツのように」と述べます。素晴らしい、目を覚ましにするようなトークで、彼女は私たちが国々を穴から抜け出し、人々が生活の必需品に不足している状態から抜け出し、地球の生態学的限界内で機能する再生可能かつ分配的な経済を創造する方法を説明しています。

タイトル
A healthy economy should be designed to thrive, not grow
健全な経済は成長することではなく繁栄するように設計されるべきです
スピーカー ケイト・ロース
アップロード 2018/06/05

「健全な経済は成長することではなく繁栄するように設計されるべきです(A healthy economy should be designed to thrive, not grow)」の文字起こし

Have you ever watched a baby learning to crawl? usually backwards, but then they drag themselves forwards, and then they pull themselves up to stand, and we all clap. And that simple motion of forwards and upwards, it’s the most basic direction of progress we humans recognize. We tell it in our story of evolution as well, from our lolloping ancestors to Homo erectus, finally upright, to Homo sapiens, depicted, always a man, always mid-stride.

So no wonder we so readily believe that economic progress will take this very same shape, this ever-rising line of growth. It’s time to think again, to reimagine the shape of progress, because today, we have economies that need to grow, whether or not they make us thrive, and what we need, especially in the richest countries, are economies that make us thrive whether or not they grow. Yes, it’s a little flip in words hiding a profound shift in mindset, but I believe this is the shift we need to make if we, humanity, are going to thrive here together this century.

So where did this obsession with growth come from? Well, GDP, gross domestic product, it’s just the total cost of goods and services sold in an economy in a year. It was invented in the 1930s, but it very soon became the overriding goal of policymaking, so much so that even today, in the richest of countries, governments think that the solution to their economic problems lies in more growth. Just how that happened is best told through the 1960 classic by W.W. Rostow. I love it so much, I have a first-edition copy. “The Stages of Economic Growth: A Non-Communist Manifesto.” You can just smell the politics, huh? And Rostow tells us that all economies need to pass through five stages of growth: first, traditional society, where a nation’s output is limited by its technology, its institutions and mindset; but then the preconditions for takeoff, where we get the beginnings of a banking industry, the mechanization of work and the belief that growth is necessary for something beyond itself, like national dignity or a better life for the children; then takeoff, where compound interest is built into the economy’s institutions and growth becomes the normal condition; fourth is the drive to maturity where you can have any industry you want, no matter your natural resource base; and the fifth and final stage, the age of high-mass consumption where people can buy all the consumer goods they want, like bicycles and sewing machines — this was 1960, remember.

Well, you can hear the implicit airplane metaphor in this story, but this plane is like no other, because it can never be allowed to land. Rostow left us flying into the sunset of mass consumerism, and he knew it. As he wrote, “And then the question beyond, where history offers us only fragments. What to do when the increase in real income itself loses its charm?” He asked that question, but he never answered it, and here’s why. The year was 1960, he was an advisor to the presidential candidate John F. Kennedy, who was running for election on the promise of five-percent growth, so Rostow’s job was to keep that plane flying, not to ask if, how, or when it could ever be allowed to land.

So here we are, flying into the sunset of mass consumerism over half a century on, with economies that have come to expect, demand and depend upon unending growth, because we’re financially, politically and socially addicted to it.

We’re financially addicted to growth, because today’s financial system is designed to pursue the highest rate of monetary return, putting publicly traded companies under constant pressure to deliver growing sales, growing market share and growing profits, and because banks create money as debt bearing interest, which must be repaid with more. We’re politically addicted to growth because politicians want to raise tax revenue without raising taxes and a growing GDP seems a sure way to do that. And no politician wants to lose their place in the G-20 family photo.

But if their economy stops growing while the rest keep going, well, they’ll be booted out by the next emerging powerhouse. And we are socially addicted to growth, because thanks to a century of consumer propaganda, which fascinatingly was created by Edward Bernays, the nephew of Sigmund Freud, who realized that his uncle’s psychotherapy could be turned into very lucrative retail therapy if we could be convinced to believe that we transform ourselves every time we buy something more. None of these addictions are insurmountable, but they all deserve far more attention than they currently get, because look where this journey has been taking us.

Global GDP is 10 times bigger than it was in 1950 and that increase has brought prosperity to billions of people, but the global economy has also become incredibly divisive, with the vast share of returns to wealth now accruing to a fraction of the global one percent. And the economy has become incredibly degenerative, rapidly destabilizing this delicately balanced planet on which all of our lives depend. Our politicians know it, and so they offer new destinations for growth. You can have green growth, inclusive growth, smart, resilient, balanced growth. Choose any future you want so long as you choose growth.

I think it’s time to choose a higher ambition, a far bigger one, because humanity’s 21st century challenge is clear: to meet the needs of all people within the means of this extraordinary, unique, living planet so that we and the rest of nature can thrive. Progress on this goal isn’t going to be measured with the metric of money. We need a dashboard of indicators. And when I sat down to try and draw a picture of what that might look like, strange though this is going to sound, it came out looking like a doughnut.

I know, I’m sorry, but let me introduce you to the one doughnut that might actually turn out to be good for us. So imagine humanity’s resource use radiating out from the middle. That hole in the middle is a place where people are falling short on life’s essentials. They don’t have the food, health care, education, political voice, housing that every person needs for a life of dignity and opportunity. We want to get everybody out of the hole, over the social foundation and into that green doughnut itself. But, and it’s a big but, we cannot let our collective resource use overshoot that outer circle, the ecological ceiling, because there we put so much pressure on this extraordinary planet that we begin to kick it out of kilter. We cause climate breakdown, we acidify the oceans, a hole in the ozone layer, pushing ourselves beyond the planetary boundaries of the life-supporting systems that have for the last 11,000 years made earth such a benevolent home to humanity. So this double-sided challenge to meet the needs of all within the means of the planet, it invites a new shape of progress, no longer this ever-rising line of growth, but a sweet spot for humanity, thriving in dynamic balance between the foundation and the ceiling.

And I was really struck once I’d drawn this picture to realize that the symbol of well-being in many ancient cultures reflects this very same sense of dynamic balance, from the Maori Takarangi to the Taoist Yin Yang, the Buddhist endless knot, the Celtic double spiral. So can we find this dynamic balance in the 21st century? Well, that’s a key question, because as these red wedges show, right now we are far from balanced, falling short and overshooting at the same time. Look in that hole, you can see that millions or billions of people worldwide still fall short on their most basic of needs. And yet, we’ve already overshot at least four of these planetary boundaries, risking irreversible impact of climate breakdown and ecosystem collapse. This is the state of humanity and our planetary home. We, the people of the early 21st century, this is our selfie.

No economist from last century saw this picture, so why would we imagine that their theories would be up for taking on its challenges? because we are the first generation to see this and probably the last with a real chance of turning this story around. You see, 20th-century economics assured us that if growth creates inequality, don’t try to redistribute, because more growth will even things up again. If growth creates pollution, don’t try to regulate, because more growth will clean things up again. Except, it turns out, it doesn’t, and it won’t. We need to create economies that tackle this shortfall and overshoot together, by design. We need economies that are regenerative and distributive by design.

You see, we’ve inherited degenerative industries. We take earth’s materials, make them into stuff we want, use it for a while, often only once, and then throw it away, and that is pushing us over planetary boundaries, so we need to bend those arrows around, create economies that work with and within the cycles of the living world, so that resources are never used up but used again and again, economies that run on sunlight, where waste from one process is food for the next. And this kind of regenerative design is popping up everywhere.

Over a hundred cities worldwide, from Quito to Oslo, from Harare to Hobart, already generate more than 70 percent of their electricity from sun, wind and waves. Cities like London, Glasgow, Amsterdam are pioneering circular city design, finding ways to turn the waste from one urban process into food for the next. And from Tigray, Ethiopia to Queensland, Australia, farmers and foresters are regenerating once-barren landscapes so that it teems with life again.

But as well as being regenerative by design, our economies must be distributive by design, and we’ve got unprecedented opportunities for making that happen, because 20th-century centralized technologies, institutions, concentrated wealth, knowledge and power in few hands. This century, we can design our technologies and institutions to distribute wealth, knowledge and empowerment to many. Instead of fossil fuel energy and large-scale manufacturing, we’ve got renewable energy networks, digital platforms and 3D printing. 200 years of corporate control of intellectual property is being upended by the bottom-up, open-source, peer-to-peer knowledge commons. And corporations that still pursue maximum rate of return for their shareholders, well they suddenly look rather out of date next to social enterprises that are designed to generate multiple forms of value and share it with those throughout their networks.

If we can harness today’s technologies, from AI to blockchain to the Internet of Things to material science, if we can harness these in service of distributive design, we can ensure that health care, education, finance, energy, political voice reaches and empowers those people who need it most. You see, regenerative and distributive design create extraordinary opportunities for the 21st-century economy. So where does this leave Rostow’s airplane ride? Well, for some it still carries the hope of endless green growth, the idea that thanks to dematerialization, exponential GDP growth can go on forever while resource use keeps falling. But look at the data. This is a flight of fancy.

Yes, we need to dematerialize our economies, but this dependency on unending growth cannot be decoupled from resource use on anything like the scale required to bring us safely back within planetary boundaries. I know this way of thinking about growth is unfamiliar, because growth is good, no? We want our children to grow, our gardens to grow. Yes, look to nature and growth is a wonderful, healthy source of life. It’s a phase, but many economies like Ethiopia and Nepal today may be in that phase. Their economies are growing at seven percent a year.

But look again to nature, because from your children’s feet to the Amazon forest, nothing in nature grows forever. Things grow, and they grow up and they mature, and it’s only by doing so that they can thrive for a very long time. We already know this. If I told you my friend went to the doctor who told her she had a growth that feels very different, because we intuitively understand that when something tries to grow forever within a healthy, living, thriving system, it’s a threat to the health of the whole.

So why would we imagine that our economies would be the one system that could buck this trend and succeed by growing forever? We urgently need financial, political and social innovations that enable us to overcome this structural dependency on growth, so that we can instead focus on thriving and balance within the social and the ecological boundaries of the doughnut. And if the mere idea of boundaries makes you feel, well, bounded, think again. Because the world’s most ingenious people turn boundaries into the source of their creativity. From Mozart on his five-octave piano Jimi Hendrix on his six-string guitar, Serena Williams on a tennis court, it’s boundaries that unleash our potential.

And the doughnut’s boundaries unleash the potential for humanity to thrive with boundless creativity, participation, belonging and meaning. It’s going to take all the ingenuity that we have got to get there, so bring it on.

「健全な経済は成長することではなく繁栄するように設計されるべきです(A healthy economy should be designed to thrive, not grow)」の和訳

赤ちゃんがはうことを学ぶのを見たことがありますか?普通は後ろ向きですが、それから前に引っ張られ、立ち上がるために引っ張られ、私たちは皆手をたたきます。前進と上昇のその単純な動きは、私たち人間が認識する最も基本的な進歩の方向です。私たちは進化の物語でもそれを語っており、ヒトが直立した、いつも男性で、常に歩みを進めている、という様子を描いています。

ですから、私たちは経済的な進歩がまさにこの形を取ると簡単に信じるのも無理はありません。成長のこの絶え間ないラインです。もう一度考え直し、進歩の形を再想像する時がきたのです。なぜなら今日、私たちは成長しなければならない経済を持っているのです。私たちが繁栄するかどうかにかかわらず、そして特に最も裕福な国々で必要なのは、成長しなくても私たちが繁栄する経済なのです。はい、これは言葉の裏返しであり、考え方の根本的な変化を隠していますが、私はこれが私たちがこの世紀にここで一緒に繁栄するために行う必要のある変化だと信じています。

では、この成長への執着はどこから来たのでしょうか?さて、GDP、国内総生産、それは経済が1年間に販売された財とサービスの総額にすぎません。それは1930年代に考案されましたが、すぐに政策形成の主要な目標となりました。今日でも、最も裕福な国々でも、政府は経済問題の解決策が成長にあると考えています。その歴史は、W.W. Rostowの1960年の名著によって最もよく語られています。私はそれが大好きで、初版本のコピーを持っています。「経済成長の段階:共産主義者ではない宣言」。政治の匂いがただただ漂っていますね。そして、Rostowは私たちに、すべての経済は5つの成長段階を経なければならないと言います。最初は、伝統的な社会で、国の生産はその技術、制度、そして考え方によって制限されます。しかし、次に、離陸の前提条件があります。そこでは、銀行業界の始まり、仕事の機械化、そして成長が国家の尊厳や子供たちのより良い生活など、それ自体以外の何かのために必要であるという信念が生まれます。それから離陸し、複利が経済の制度に組み込まれ、成長が通常の状態になります。四番目は成熟への志向であり、天然資源基盤に関係なく、任意の産業を持つことができます。そして、最後の第五段階は、高度な大量消費の時代であり、人々が自転車やミシンなどの消費財を自由に買うことができる時代です。これは1960年の話です、覚えていますか。

この物語には、暗黙のうちに飛行機のメタファーが聞こえてきますが、この飛行機は他のどの飛行機とも異なります。なぜなら、これは決して着陸させてはいけないからです。ロストウは私たちを大量消費主義の夕日に向かって飛ばしましたが、彼はそれを知っていました。彼はこう書いています。「そして、歴史が私たちに断片しか提供しない場合のその先の問題。実質的な収入の増加自体が魅力を失った場合に何をすべきか?」彼はその質問を投げかけましたが、決して答えませんでした。なぜなら、その年は1960年であり、彼は大統領候補ジョン・F・ケネディの顧問であり、彼は5%の成長を約束して選挙に出馬していたので、ロストウの仕事はその飛行機を飛ばし続けることであり、いつ、どのように、いつ着陸させることができるかを尋ねることではありませんでした。

それで、ここにいます。大量消費主義の夕日に向かって半世紀以上経ち、経済は終わりのない成長を期待し、要求し、依存しています。なぜなら、私たちは財政的に、政治的に、社会的にそれに中毒になっているからです。

私たちは財政的に成長に中毒です。なぜなら、今日の金融システムは金銭的リターン率を追求するように設計されており、上場企業を成長する売上高、市場シェア、利益を提供することに常に圧力をかけています。また、銀行は利子を支払う借金としてお金を作り出しますが、これはより多くのお金で返済しなければなりません。政治的に成長に中毒です。なぜなら、政治家は税収を上げずに税金を上げたいと考え、成長するGDPはそれを確実な方法と考えられています。そして、どの政治家もG-20の家族写真での場所を失いたくありません。

しかし、彼らの経済が成長を止めた場合、他の国々が成長を続ける一方で、次の新興大国に追い出されるでしょう。そして、私たちは社会的に成長に中毒です。なぜなら、100年の消費者プロパガンダのおかげで、それは興味深いことに、ジークムント・フロイトの甥であるエドワード・バーネーズによって作成されました。彼は、叔父の精神療法が非常に収益性の高い小売療法に変わることができると気づきました。私たちが毎回何かを買うたびに自分自身を変えることができると信じさせられれば。これらの中毒はどれも乗り越えられるものですが、現在のところそれらは十分な注目を受けているとは言えません。これが私たちをどこに連れていったかを見てください。

世界のGDPは1950年と比較して10倍になり、この増加は何十億人もの人々に繁栄をもたらしました。しかし、世界経済は信じられないほど分裂しており、富の大部分は今や世界の1%のごく一部に蓄積されています。そして、経済は信じられないほど劣化しており、この微妙なバランスの取れた惑星を急速に不安定化させています。私たちの生活が依存している惑星です。政治家たちはそれを知っています。そして、彼らは成長のための新しい目的地を提供しています。グリーン成長、包摂的成長、スマートで、回復力があり、バランスの取れた成長。成長を選ぶ限り、どんな未来も選ぶことができます。

私は、より高い目標、はるかに大きな目標を選ぶ時が来たと考えています。なぜなら、21世紀の人類の課題は明確です。この非常に特異で生命力ある惑星の手段内で、すべての人々のニーズを満たすこと、そして私たちと自然の残りの部分が繁栄できるようにすることです。この目標の達成はお金の尺度では測定されません。私たちは指標のダッシュボードが必要です。そして、私が座ってその姿を描こうとしたとき、これがどれほど奇妙であるかにもかかわらず、ドーナツのように見えました。

わかりました、申し訳ありませんが、実際に私たちにとって良いかもしれない1つのドーナツを紹介させてください。想像してください、人類の資源利用が中心から放射状に広がっています。中心の穴は、人々が生活の基本的な必需品を満たしていない場所です。彼らには食べ物、医療、教育、政治的発言力、住居がありません。すべての人が尊厳と機会のある人生を送るために必要なものです。私たちは、誰もがその穴から出て、社会的基盤を超えて緑のドーナツに入ることを望んでいます。しかし、大きな課題があります。私たちは、共同の資源利用が外側の円、生態学的な天井を超えてしまわないようにしなければなりません。そこでは、この非常に特異な惑星に多大な圧力をかけ、それを軌道から外してしまいます。気候変動を引き起こし、海洋を酸性化させ、オゾン層の穴を作り出すことで、過去11,000年間、地球を人類にとって非常に恵まれた家として作り上げてきた生命維持システムの惑星の境界を越えてしまいます。ですから、この全体の課題は、惑星の手段内ですべてのニーズを満たすことに、新しい進歩の形を招待しています。もはやこの絶え間なく上昇する成長のラインではなく、人間が基盤と天井の間で動的なバランスを保ちながら繁栄する甘いスポットです。

そして、私がこの図を描いた後に驚いたのは、多くの古代文化における幸福の象徴が、この非常にダイナミックなバランス感を反映していることです。マオリのタカランギから道教の陰陽、仏教の無限の結び目、ケルトの二重らせんまでです。21世紀にこのダイナミックなバランスを見つけることができるでしょうか?これは重要な問題です。なぜなら、これらの赤いくさびが示すように、現在私たちはバランスを欠いており、同時に不足と過剰をしています。その穴を見てください、世界中の何百万人も何十億人もがまだ最も基本的なニーズを満たしていません。それにもかかわらず、私たちはすでに少なくともこれらの地球の境界の4つを超えてしまい、気候変動と生態系の崩壊における不可逆的な影響を冒しています。これが人類と私たちの地球の家の状態です。私たちは、21世紀初頭の人々、これが私たちの自撮りです。

前世紀のどの経済学者もこの図を見たわけではありませんので、なぜ彼らの理論がこれらの挑戦に対処できると想像するのでしょうか?なぜなら、私たちはこれを見る最初の世代であり、おそらくこの物語を変える本当のチャンスを持つ最後の世代です。20世紀の経済学は、成長が不平等を生む場合、再配分を試みないでください、と私たちに保証しました。なぜなら、さらなる成長がすべてを再び均等にするからです。成長が汚染を引き起こす場合、規制を試みないでください、なぜならさらなる成長が再び綺麗にするからです。ただし、それは実際にはそうではなく、そしてそうなりません。私たちは、デザインによって、この不足とオーバーシュートに取り組む経済を作り出す必要があります。私たちが必要とするのは、デザインによって再生可能で分配的な経済です。

見てください、私たちは退行的な産業を受け継いでいます。地球の材料を取り、それを私たちが欲しいものに作り変え、しばしば一度だけ使い、それから捨てる。これは私たちを地球の境界を超えさせています。ですから、それらの矢印を曲げて、生きている世界の循環の中で動作し、循環内で動作する経済を作り出す必要があります。リソースが使い尽くされるのではなく、何度も使われるようになります。太陽の光で動作する経済、1つのプロセスの廃棄物が次のプロセスの食料となる経済。そして、このような再生可能なデザインはあらゆるところで現れています。

キトからオスロ、ハラレからホバートまでの世界中の100以上の都市が、既に太陽、風、波からの電力の70%以上を発生させています。ロンドン、グラスゴー、アムステルダムなどの都市は、循環都市デザインを先駆けており、1つの都市プロセスの廃棄物を次のプロセスの食料に変える方法を見つけています。エチオピアのティグライからオーストラリアのクイーンズランドまで、農民や林業者はかつての不毛な風景を再生し、再び生命が溢れるようにしています。

しかし、デザインによって再生可能であるだけでなく、私たちの経済はデザインによって分配的でなければなりません。そして、それを実現するための前例のない機会があります。なぜなら、20世紀の中央集権的な技術や制度は、少数の手に集中して富、知識、そして権力を集中させました。この世紀、私たちは技術や制度を設計して、富、知識、そして権力を多くの人々に分配できるようにすることができます。化石燃料エネルギーや大規模な製造に代わって、再生可能エネルギーネットワーク、デジタルプラットフォーム、3Dプリンティングがあります。200年間の企業による知的財産の支配は、ボトムアップ、オープンソース、ピアツーピアの知識共有によって根底から覆されつつあります。株主に対する最大の利益率を追求する企業は、彼らのネットワーク全体で多様な形式の価値を生成し、それを共有するように設計された社会企業と比較すると、突然時代遅れに見えます。

私たちが今日の技術、AIからブロックチェーン、モノのインターネット、材料科学まで、これらを分配的なデザインのために活用できれば、医療、教育、ファイナンス、エネルギー、政治的発言権が最も必要とする人々に届き、彼らを力づけることができます。再生可能で分配的なデザインは、21世紀の経済にとって非常に素晴らしい機会を創出します。では、これはRostowの飛行機の旅に何を残すのでしょうか?一部の人々にとって、それはまだ終わりのない緑の成長の希望を抱えており、資源利用が減少し続ける一方で、指数関数的なGDP成長が永遠に続くという考えです。しかし、データを見てください。これは空想の飛行です。

はい、私たちは経済の物質化を必要としていますが、この終わりのない成長への依存は、私たちを安全に地球の境界内に戻すために必要なスケールでの資源利用から切り離すことはできません。成長についてのこの考え方は馴染みがないかもしれません。成長は良いことですよね?子供たちが成長し、庭が成長することを望みます。はい、自然を見ると、成長は素晴らしい、健康な命の源です。それは段階ですが、エチオピアやネパールのような多くの経済はその段階にあるかもしれません。彼らの経済は年間7%成長しています。

しかし、もう一度自然を見てください。あなたの子供たちの足からアマゾンの森まで、自然の中には何も永遠に成長するものはありません。物事は成長し、成長し、成熟し、そして非常に長い間繁栄することができるのはそうすることだけです。私たちはすでにこれを知っています。もし私が友達が医者に行って、医者が彼女に成長があると言ったとしたら、それは非常に異なる感じがします。なぜなら、健康で生き生きとしたシステム内で永遠に成長しようとするものは、全体の健康に対する脅威であることを直感的に理解しているからです。

では、なぜ私たちの経済がこのトレンドを逆らい、永遠に成長して成功する唯一のシステムであると想像するのでしょうか?私たちは成長へのこの構造的な依存から脱却し、代わりにドーナツの社会的および生態学的境界内での繁栄とバランスに焦点を合わせるための、財政、政治、社会のイノベーションを急いで必要としています。そして、境界という単語だけであなたが制約されたように感じるのであれば、考え直してください。なぜなら、世界で最も独創的な人々は境界を彼らの創造性の源に変えます。モーツァルトが5オクターブのピアノ、ジミ・ヘンドリックスが6弦のギター、セレナ・ウィリアムズがテニスコートで、それは境界が私たちのポテンシャルを解放するものです。

そして、ドーナツの境界は、無限の創造性、参加、所属感、意味を持つ人類が繁栄する可能性を解き放ちます。そこに到達するには、私たちが持っているすべての創造力が必要です。なので、さあ、取り組みましょう。

コメント

タイトルとURLをコピーしました