一目で分かる!視覚知能を鍛える4つのステップとその効果

自己啓発

Are you looking closely? Visual educator Amy Herman explains how to use art to enhance your powers of perception and find connections where they may not be apparent. Learn the techniques Herman uses to train Navy SEALs, doctors and crime scene investigators to convert observable details into actionable knowledge with this insightful talk.

目を凝らして見ていますか? ビジュアル教育者のエイミー・ハーマンが、芸術を使って知覚力を高め、見えないつながりを見つける方法を説明します。

この示唆に富んだトークで、ハーマンが海軍特殊部隊員、医師、犯罪現場の捜査官に使う技術を学んで、観察可能な詳細を実用的な知識に変える方法を知りましょう。

タイトル
A lesson on looking
見ることについてのレッスン
スピーカー エイミー・ハーマン
アップロード 2018/12/11

「見ることについてのレッスン(A lesson on looking)」の文字起こし

Take a look at this work of art. What is it that you see? At first glance, it looks to be a grandfather clock with a sheet thrown over it and a rope tied around the center. But a first look always warrants a second. Look again. What do you see now? If you look more closely, you’ll realize that this entire work of art is made from one piece of sculpture. There is no clock, there is no rope, and there is no sheet. It is one piece of bleached Honduras mahogany.

Now let me be clear: this exercise was not about looking at sculpture. It’s about looking and understanding that looking closely can save a life, change your company, and even help you understand why your children behave the way they do. It’s a skill that I call visual intelligence, and I use works of art to teach everybody, from everyday people to those for whom looking is the job, like Navy SEALs and homicide detectives and trauma nurses.

The fact is that no matter how skilled you might be at looking, you still have so much to learn about seeing. Because we all think we get it in a first glance and a sudden flash, but the real skill is in understanding how to look slowly and how to look more carefully. The talent is in remembering — in the crush of the daily urgencies that demand our attention — to step back and look through those lenses to help us see what we’ve been missing all along.

So how can looking at painting and sculpture help? Because art is a powerful tool. It’s a powerful tool that engages both sight and insight and reframes our understanding of where we are and what we see. Here’s an example of a work of art that reminded me that visual intelligence — it’s an ongoing learning process and one that really is never mastered. I came across this quiet, seemingly abstract painting, and I had to step up to it twice, even three times, to understand why it resonated so deeply. Now, I’ve seen the Washington Monument in person thousands of times, well aware of the change in the color of marble a third of the way up, but I had never really looked at it out of context or truly as a work of art. And here, Georgia O’Keeffe’s painting of this architectural icon made me realize that if we put our mind to it, it’s possible to see everyday things in a wholly new and eye-opening perspective.

Now, there are some skeptics that believe that art just belongs in an art museum. They believe that it has no practical use beyond its aesthetic value. I know who they are in every audience I teach. Their arms are crossed, their legs are crossed, their body language is saying, “What am I going to learn from this lady who talks fast about painting and sculpture?” So how do I make it relevant for them? I ask them to look at this work of art, like this portrait by Kumi Yamashita. And I ask them to step in close, and even closer still, and while they’re looking at the work of art, they need to be asking questions about what they see. And if they ask the right questions, like, “What is this work of art? Is it a painting? Is it a sculpture? What is it made of?” … they will find out that this entire work of art is made of a wooden board, 10,000 nails, and one unbroken piece of sewing thread. Now that might be interesting to some of you, but what does it have to do with the work that these people do? And the answer is everything.

Because we all interact with people multiple times on a daily basis, and we need to get better at asking questions about what it is that we see. Learning to frame the question in such a way as to elicit the information that we need to do our jobs is a critical life skill. Like the radiologist who told me that looking at the negative spaces in a painting helped her discern more discreet abnormalities in an MRI. Or the police officer who said that understanding the emotional dynamic between people in a painting helped him to read body language at a domestic violence crime scene, and it enabled him to think twice before drawing and firing his weapon. And even parents can look to see absences of color in paintings to understand that what their children say to them is as important as what they don’t say.

So how do I — how do I train to be more visually intelligent? It comes down to four As. Every new situation, every new problem — we practice four As. First, we assess our situation. We ask, “What do we have in front of us?” Then, we analyze it. We say, “What’s important? What do I need? What don’t I need?” Then, we articulate it in a conversation, in a memo, in a text, in an email. And then, we act: we make a decision. We all do this multiple times a day, but we don’t realize what a role seeing and looking plays in all of those actions, and how visual intelligence can really improve everything.

So recently, I had a group of counterterrorism officials at a museum in front of this painting. El Greco’s painting, “The Purification of the Temple,” in which Christ, in the center, in a sweeping and violent gesture, is expelling the sinners from the temple of prayer. The group of counterterrorism officials had five minutes with that painting, and in that short amount of time, they had to assess the situation, analyze the details, articulate what, if anything, they would do if they were in that painting. As you can imagine, observations and insights differed. Who would they talk to? Who would be the best witness? Who was a good potential witness? Who was lurking? Who had the most information? But my favorite comment came from a seasoned cop who looked at the central figure and said, “You see that guy in the pink?” — referring to Christ — he said, “I’d collar him, he’s causing all the trouble.”

So looking at art gives us a perfect vehicle to rethink how we solve problems without the aid of technology. Looking at the work of Felix Gonzalez-Torres, you see two clocks in perfect synchronicity. The hour, minute and second hand perfectly aligned. They are installed side by side and they’re touching, and they are entitled “‘Untitled’ (Perfect Lovers).” But closer analysis makes you realize that these are two battery-operated clocks, which in turn makes you understand — “Hey, wait a minute … One of those batteries is going to stop before the other. One of those clocks is going to slow down and die before the other and it’s going to alter the symmetry of the artwork.” Just articulating that thought process includes the necessity of a contingency plan.

You need to have contingencies for the unforeseen, the unexpected and the unknown, whenever and however they may happen. Now, using art to increase our visual intelligence involves planning for contingencies, understanding the big picture and the small details, and noticing what’s not there. So in this painting by Magritte, noticing that there are no tracks under the train, there is no fire in the fireplace and there are no candles in the candlesticks actually more accurately describes the painting than if you were to say, “Well, there’s a train coming out of a fireplace, and there are candlesticks on the mantle.” It may sound counterintuitive to say what isn’t there, but it’s really a very valuable tool. When a detective who had learned about visual intelligence in North Carolina was called to the crime scene, it was a boating fatality, and the eyewitness told this detective that the boat had flipped over and the occupant had drowned underneath. Now, instinctively, crime scene investigators look for what is apparent, but this detective did something different. He looked for what wasn’t there, which is harder to do. And he raised the question: if the boat had really tipped flipped over — as the eyewitness said that it did — how come the papers that were kept at one end of the boat were completely dry? Based on that one small but critical observation, the investigation shifted from accidental death to homicide.

Now, equally important to saying what isn’t there is the ability to find visual connections where they may not be apparent. Like Marie Watt’s totem pole of blankets. It illustrates that finding hidden connections in everyday objects can resonate so deeply. The artist collected blankets from all different people in her community, and she had the owners of the blankets write, on a tag, the significance of the blanket to the family. Some of the blankets had been used for baby blankets, some of them had been used as picnic blankets, some of them had been used for the dog. We all have blankets in our homes and understand the significance that they play. But similarly, I instruct new doctors: when they walk into a patient’s room, before they pick up that medical chart, just look around the room. Are there balloons or cards, or that special blanket on the bed? That tells the doctor there’s a connection to the outside world. If that patient has someone in the outside world to assist them and help them, the doctor can implement the best care with that connection in mind. In medicine, people are connected as humans before they’re identified as doctor and patient. But this method of enhancing perception — it need not be disruptive, and it doesn’t necessitate an overhaul in looking. Like Jorge Mendez Blake’s sculpture of building a brick wall above Kafka’s book “El Castillo” shows that more astute observation can be subtle and yet invaluable. You can discern the book, and you can see how it disrupted the symmetry of the bricks directly above it, but by the time you get to the end of the sculpture, you can no longer see the book. But looking at the work of art in its entirety, you see that the impact of the work’s disruption on the bricks is nuanced and unmistakable. One thought, one idea, one innovation can alter an approach, change a process and even save lives.

I’ve been teaching visual intelligence for over 15 years, and to my great amazement and astonishment — to my never-ending astonishment and amazement, I have seen that looking at art with a critical eye can help to anchor us in our world of uncharted waters, whether you are a paramilitary trooper, a caregiver, a doctor or a mother. Because let’s face it, things go wrong.

Things go wrong. And don’t misunderstand me, I’d eat that doughnut in a minute. But we need to understand the consequences of what it is that we observe, and we need to convert observable details into actionable knowledge. Like Jennifer Odem’s sculpture of tables standing sentinel on the banks of the Mississippi River in New Orleans, guarding against the threat of post-Katrina floodwaters and rising up against adversity, we too have the ability to act affirmatively and affect positive change. I have been mining the world of art to help people across the professional spectrum to see the extraordinary in the everyday, to articulate what is absent and to be able to inspire creativity and innovation, no matter how small. And most importantly, to forge human connections where they may not be apparent, empowering us all to see our work and the world writ large with a new set of eyes. Thank you.

「見ることについてのレッスン(A lesson on looking)」の和訳

この作品を見てください。皆さんは何を見ますか?一見すると、シーツをかけてロープで真ん中を縛ったおじいさんの時計のように見えますね。でも、最初の見方には二度目の見方が必要です。もう一度見てみてください。今度は何が見えますか?もっとよく見ると、この作品全体が一つの彫刻からできていることに気づくでしょう。時計も、ロープも、シーツもありません。一つの漂白されたホンジュラス・マホガニーからできているのです。

さて、はっきりさせておきたいのは、この練習は彫刻を見ることが目的ではないということです。これは、注意深く見ることが命を救い、会社を変え、さらには子供たちの行動を理解する手助けになることを理解するための練習です。私はこれを「視覚知能」と呼び、日常の人々から、海軍特殊部隊や殺人事件の捜査官、トラウマ看護師のように見ることが仕事である人々まで、あらゆる人々に教えています。

実際のところ、どれほど見ることに熟練していても、見ることについてまだまだ学ぶべきことがたくさんあります。私たちは皆、最初の一瞥や突然の閃きで全てを理解したつもりになりますが、本当のスキルはゆっくりと注意深く見ることにあります。才能とは、私たちの注意を引く日々の緊急事態の中で、立ち止まり、それまで見逃していたものを見るためのレンズを通して見ることを思い出すことにあるのです。

では、絵画や彫刻を見ることがどう役立つのでしょうか?それは、アートが強力なツールだからです。アートは視覚と洞察を同時に働かせ、私たちのいる場所や見ているものの理解を再構築します。ここに、視覚知能が継続的な学習プロセスであり、決して完全には習得できないものであることを思い出させてくれたアート作品の例があります。この静かで一見抽象的な絵画に出会ったとき、私はそれに何度も近づいて、その作品がなぜそんなに深く共鳴したのか理解しようとしました。ワシントン記念塔を実際に見たことは何千回もありますし、大理石の色が3分の1ほどの高さで変わることも知っていましたが、それを文脈外で、あるいは本当のアート作品として見たことはありませんでした。ジョージア・オキーフのこの建築アイコンの絵を通じて、日常のものを全く新しい、目を見張る視点で見ることができることに気づかされました。

さて、アートは美術館にしか存在しないという懐疑的な人々がいます。彼らは、アートには美的価値以外に実用性がないと信じています。私は教えるどの聴衆の中にもそのような人々がいることを知っています。彼らは腕を組み、足を組み、体の言語が「この絵画や彫刻について早口で話す女性から何を学ぶのだろうか?」と言っています。では、どうやって彼らに関連性を持たせるのでしょうか?私は彼らに、このクミ・ヤマシタの肖像画のようなアート作品を見てもらいます。そして、近づいて、さらに近づいて、そのアート作品を見ながら質問をするように求めます。「このアート作品は何か?絵画か?彫刻か?何でできているのか?」という正しい質問をすれば、この作品全体が木製の板、1万本の釘、そして1本の切れていない縫い糸でできていることがわかります。これに興味を持つ人もいるかもしれませんが、これが彼らの仕事と何の関係があるのか?その答えは「すべて」です。

私たちは日々何度も人と交流し、私たちの仕事をするために必要な情報を引き出すための質問をすることを改善する必要があります。質問をフレーム化することを学ぶことは、重要な生活のスキルです。たとえば、ある放射線科医は、絵画のネガティブスペースを見ることで、MRIでのより微妙な異常を識別できると言いました。また、ある警官は、絵画の中の人々の感情的なダイナミックを理解することで、家庭内暴力の現場での身体言語を読むのを助け、銃を抜いて発砲する前に考え直すことができたと述べました。また、親は絵画の色の欠如を見ることで、子供たちが何を言うかだけでなく、何を言わないかも理解することができます。

では、私はどのようにしてより視覚的に賢くなるための訓練を受けるのでしょうか?それは「4つのA」に帰結します。すべての新しい状況、新しい問題に対して、私たちは4つのAを実践します。まず、状況を評価します。「目の前に何があるか?」と問います。次に、それを分析します。「何が重要か?何が必要か?何が不要か?」と考えます。その後、会話、メモ、テキスト、メールなどでそれを明確に表現します。最後に、行動します。決断を下します。私たちは毎日何度もこれを行っていますが、これらの行動のすべてに見ることや視覚的知性がどれほどの役割を果たしているか、そして視覚的知性がすべてを実際に改善できるかに気付いていないのです。

最近、私は博物館でテロ対策の担当者のグループとこの絵の前に立ちました。エル・グレコの「神殿の清め」の絵です。中央にいるキリストが祈りの場から罪人たちを追い出すという、大掛かりで暴力的なジェスチャーをします。テロ対策の担当者たちはその絵に5分間だけ触れ、その短い時間の中で状況を評価し、細部を分析し、もしその絵の中にいたら何をするかを明確にしなければなりませんでした。想像できるように、観察や洞察は異なりました。誰に話しかけるか?誰が最適な証人か?誰が潜んでいるか?誰が最も情報を持っているか?しかし、私のお気に入りのコメントは、経験豊富な警官から来ました。「あのピンクの服を着ている人を見てくれ」と、彼は言いました。キリストを指して。「私は彼を逮捕するよ。彼がトラブルを起こしているんだから」

芸術を見ることは、技術の支援なしに問題を解決する方法を再考する絶好の機会を提供してくれます。フェリックス・ゴンザレス・トーレスの作品を見ると、完全に同期した2つの時計があります。時、分、秒針が完全に整列しています。それらは並んで設置され、接しており、「’Untitled’ (Perfect Lovers)」と題されています。しかし、より詳細に分析すると、これらは2つの電池で動く時計であることがわかります。これにより、「ちょっと待ってください…その電池のうち1つが先に切れるはずです。その時計の一つが遅れて停止し、アートワークの対称性が変わることになります」ということが理解されます。この思考過程を明確に表現するだけで、緊急時対策の必要性が含まれます。

未知の、予期せぬ、そして未知の場合に備えて、いつでもどのような形であれ、予備計画を持っている必要があります。芸術を使って私たちの視覚的知性を高めることは、緊急時対策を計画し、全体像と細部を理解し、そこにないものに気づくことを含みます。マグリットのこの絵画では、列車の下に線路がなく、暖炉には火がなく、キャンドルスティックにはろうそくがないことに気づくことが実際には絵画をより正確に説明します。「えーと、暖炉から列車が出てきて、マントルピースにキャンドルスティックがある」と言うよりも、「そこには何もない」と言う方が、より正確です。それがないものを言うのは直感的には不自然かもしれませんが、それは実際には非常に有益なツールです。ノースカロライナで視覚的知性を学んだ刑事が犯罪現場に呼ばれたとき、それはボートの死亡事故であり、目撃者がそのボートがひっくり返って乗員がその下で溺れたと言ったのでした。直感的には、犯罪現場の捜査官は明らかなものを探しますが、この刑事は違うことをしました。彼はそこにないものを探しました。それは難しいことです。彼は問題提起しました。もしボートが本当にひっくり返っていたのなら、目撃者が言ったように、なぜボートの一端に置かれた書類が完全に乾いているのでしょうか?その小さなが重要な観察に基づいて、捜査は事故死から殺人事件へと変わりました。

今、そこにないものを言うことと同じくらい重要なのは、見えない場所で視覚的なつながりを見つける能力です。マリー・ワットの毛布のトーテムポールのように。日常の物に隠れたつながりを見つけることがどれほど深い共鳴を呼び起こすかを示しています。アーティストは地域のさまざまな人々から毛布を集め、その毛布の所有者に家族にとっての意義をタグに書いてもらいました。その中にはベビーブランケットに使われたもの、ピクニックブランケットに使われたもの、犬のために使われたものなどがありました。私たちの家には皆、毛布があり、それが果たす意義を理解しています。同様に、新しい医師に指示するのです:患者の部屋に入る前に、その医療記録を取る前に、部屋を見渡してください。風船やカード、またはベッドの上の特別な毛布がありますか?それは医師に、外部の世界とのつながりがあることを伝えます。もしその患者が外部の世界に支援や助けを求める人がいれば、医師はそのつながりを考慮に入れて最善のケアを提供することができます。医学では、人々は医師と患者としてではなく、まず人間としてつながっています。しかし、この知覚を高める方法は、破壊的である必要はなく、見方を大幅に変える必要もありません。ホルヘ・メンデス・ブレイクの彫刻「カフカの本『城』の上にレンガの壁を築く」は、より鋭い観察が微妙でありながらも貴重であることを示しています。本がわかりますし、それが直接上にあるレンガの対称性を乱しているのが見えますが、彫刻の最後に近づくにつれて、もはやその本は見えません。しかし、その作品全体を見ると、その作品の乱れがレンガに与える影響が微妙であり、間違いなく理解できます。一つの考え、一つのアイデア、一つの革新がアプローチを変え、プロセスを変え、さらには命を救うことができるのです。

私は15年以上にわたり視覚的知性を教えてきましたが、驚きと驚異に満ちたことに、芸術を批判的な目で見ることが、私たちが未知の領域において土台を築くのに役立つことを、いつもの驚きと驚異で見てきました。あなたが準軍事部隊の兵士、介護者、医師、または母親であろうと、物事はうまくいかないことがあります。

物事はうまくいかない。そして誤解しないでください、私はそのドーナツをすぐに食べます。しかし、私たちは観察したものの結果を理解し、観察可能な詳細を実行可能な知識に変換する必要があります。ジェニファー・オデムの彫刻、ミシシッピ川の岸辺に立つテーブルが、ポストカトリーナ洪水の脅威に対抗し、逆境に立ち向かっているのを見ると、私たちも積極的に行動し、ポジティブな変化をもたらす能力を持っていることを理解します。私は芸術の世界から採掘し、プロフェッショナルのスペクトル全体の人々が日常の中に非凡なものを見ることができるようにし、欠落しているものを明確にし、創造性と革新を刺激し、どんなに小さくても人間関係を築くことができるようにしてきました。そして最も重要なことは、私たち全員が新しい視点で私たちの仕事と世界を見ることを可能にしました。ありがとうございます。

コメント

タイトルとURLをコピーしました