古代都市の誤解:文明の多様性と平等の可能性

文化

What if the commonly accepted narratives about the foundation of civilization are all wrong? Drawing on groundbreaking research, archaeologist David Wengrow challenges traditional thinking about the social evolution of humanity — from the invention of agriculture to the formation of cities and class systems — and explains how rethinking history can radically change our perspective on inequality and modern life.

伝統的な思考に挑戦する考古学者デビッド・ウェングローが、文明の起源に関する一般に受け入れられている物語がすべて間違っている可能性について考えます。

画期的な研究に基づいて、彼は人類の社会進化に関する伝統的な考え方に疑問を投げかけます。農業の発明から都市と階級制度の形成までを通じて歴史を見直すことが、不平等や現代生活に対する私たちの見方を根本的に変える方法を説明します。

タイトル A New Understanding of Human History and the Roots of Inequality
人類の歴史と不平等の根源についての新たな理解
スピーカー デビッド・ウェングロー
アップロード 2022/07/26

「人類の歴史と不平等の根源についての新たな理解(A New Understanding of Human History and the Roots of Inequality)」の文字起こし

In the summer of 2014, I was in Iraqi Kurdistan with a small team of archaeologists, finishing a season of field excavations near the border town of Halabja. Our project was looking into something which has puzzled and intrigued me ever since I began studying archaeology.

We’re taught to believe that thousands of years ago, when our ancestors first invented agriculture in that part of the world, it set in motion a chain of consequences that would shape our modern world in a particular direction, on a particular course. By farming wheat, our ancestors supposedly developed new attachments to the land they lived on. Private property was invented. And with that, the need to defend it. Along with new opportunities for some people to accumulate surpluses came new labor demands, tying most people to a hard regime of tending their crops while a privileged few received freedom and the leisure to do other things. To think, to experiment, to create the foundations of what we refer to as civilization.

Now, according to this familiar story, what happened next is that populations boomed, villages turned into towns, towns became cities, and with the emergence of cities, our species was locked on a familiar trajectory of development where spiraling populations and technological change were bound up with the kind of dreadful inequalities that we see around us today. Except, as anyone can tell you, who’s looked at the evidence from the Middle East, almost nothing of what I’ve just been saying is actually true. And the consequences I’m going to suggest are quite profound.

Actually, what happened after the invention of agriculture around 10,000 years ago, is a long period of around another 4,000 years in which villages largely remained villages. And actually, there’s very little evidence for the emergence of rigid social classes, which is not to say that nothing happened. Over those 4,000 years, technological change actually proceeded apace. Without kings, without bureaucracies, without standing armies, these early farming populations fostered the development of mathematical knowledge, advanced metallurgy. They learned to cultivate olives, vines, and date palms. They invented leavened bread, beer, and they developed textile technologies: the potter’s wheel, the sail. And they spread all of these innovations far and wide, from the shores of the eastern Mediterranean, up to the Black Sea, and from the Persian Gulf, all the way over to the mountains of Kurdistan, where our excavations were taking place.

I’ve often referred, half jokingly, to this long period of human history as the era of the first global village. Because it’s not just the technological innovations that are so remarkable, but also the social innovations which enabled people to do all these things without forming centers and without raising up a class of permanent leaders over everybody else.

Now, oddly enough, this efflorescence of culture is not what we usually refer to as civilization.

Instead, that term is usually reserved for harshly unequal societies, which came thousands of years later. Dynastic Mesopotamia. Pharaonic Egypt. Imperial Rome. Societies that were deeply stratified.

So in short, I’ve always felt that there was basically something very weird about our concept of civilization, something that leaves us lost for words, tongue-tied when we’re confronted with thousands of years of human beings practicing agriculture, creating new technologies, but not lording it over each other or exploiting each other to the maximum. Why don’t we have better words? Where is our lexicon for those long expanses of human history in which we weren’t behaving that way?

Over the past ten years or more, I worked closely together with the late, great anthropologist David Graeber to address some of these questions. But we did it on a much larger scale because, from our perspective as an archaeologist and an anthropologist, this clash between theory and data, between the standard narrative of human history and the evidence that we have before us today, is not just confined to the early Middle East. It’s everything: our whole picture of human history that we’ve been telling for centuries, it’s basically wrong.

I’m going to try and explain a few more of the reasons why. Let’s go back to some of those core concepts, the stable reference points around which we’ve been organizing and orchestrating our understanding of world history for hundreds of years. Take, for instance, that notion that for most of its history, the human species lived in tiny egalitarian bands of hunter-gatherers, until the advent of agriculture ushered in a new age of inequality.

Or the notion that with the arrival of cities came social classes, sacred kings, and rapacious oligarchs trampling everyone else underfoot. From our very first history lessons, we’re taught to believe that our modern world, with all of its advantages and amenities, modern health care, space travel, all the things that are good and exciting, couldn’t possibly exist without that original concentration of humanity into larger and larger units and the relentless buildup of inequalities that came with it. Inequality, we’re taught to believe, was the necessary price of civilization.

Well, if so, then what are we to make of the early Middle East? Perhaps one might say there was just a very, very, very long lag time, 4,000 years, before all these developments took place. Inequality was bound to happen, it was bound to set in. It was just a matter of time. And perhaps the rest of the story still works for other parts of the world.

Well, let’s think a bit about what we can actually say today about the origin of cities. Surely, you might think, with the appearance of cities came the appearance of social classes. Think about ancient Egypt with its pyramid temples. Or Shang China with its lavish tombs. The classic Maya with their warlike rulers. Or the Inca empire with its mummified kings and queens.

But actually, the picture these days is not so clear. What modern archaeology tells us, for example, is that there were already cities on the lower reaches of the Yellow River over 1,000 years before the rise of the Shang. And on the other side of the Pacific, in Peru’s Rio Supe, we already see huge agglomerations of people with monumental architecture 4,000 years before the Inca.

In South Asia, 4,500 years ago, the first cities appeared at places like Mohenjo-daro and Harappa in the Indus Valley. But these huge settlements present no evidence of kings or queens. No royal monuments, no aggrandizing art. And what’s more, we know that much of the population lived in high-quality housing with excellent sanitation.

North of the Black Sea, in the modern country of Ukraine, archaeologists have found evidence of even more ancient cities going back 6,000 years. And again, these huge settlements present no evidence of authoritarian rule. No temples, no palaces, not even any evidence of central storage facilities or top-down bureaucracy. Actually, what we see in those cases are these great concentric rings of houses arranged rather like the inside of a tree trunk around neighborhood assembly halls. And it stayed that way for about 800 years.

So what this means is that long before the birth of democracy in ancient Greece, there were already well-organized cities on several of the world’s continents which present no evidence for ruling dynasties. And some of them also seem to have managed perfectly well without priests, mandarins, and warrior politicians. Of course, some early cities did go on to become the capitals of kingdoms and empires. But it’s important to note that others went in completely the opposite direction.

To take one well-documented example, around the year 250 AD, the city of Teotihuacan, in the valley of Mexico, with a population of around 100,000 people, turned its back on pyramid temples and human sacrifices and reconstituted itself as a vast collection of comfortable villas housing most of the city’s population. When archaeologists first investigated these buildings, they assumed they were palaces. Then they realized that just about everyone in the city was living in a palace with spacious patios and subfloor drainages, gorgeous murals on the walls.

But we shouldn’t get carried away. None of the societies that I’ve been describing was perfectly egalitarian. But then we might also remember that fifth-century Athens, which we look to as the birthplace of democracy, was also a militaristic society founded on chattel slavery, where women were completely excluded from politics. So maybe by comparison, somewhere like Teotihuacan was not doing so badly at keeping the genie of inequality in its bottle.

But maybe we can just forget about all that, we can look away. Perhaps all of these things I’m talking about are basically outliers. Maybe we can still keep our familiar story of civilization intact. And after all, if cities without rulers were really such a common thing in human history, why didn’t Cortez and Pizarro and all the other conquistadors find any when they began their invasion of the Americas? Why did they find only Moctezuma and Atahualpa lording it over their empires?

Except that’s not true either. Actually, the city where Hernan Cortez found his military allies, the ones who enabled his successful assault on the Aztec capital of Tenochtitlan, was exactly one such city without rulers: an indigenous republic by the name of Tlaxcala, governed by an urban parliament, which had some pretty interesting initiation rituals for would-be politicians. They’d be periodically whipped and subject to public abuse by their constituents to sort of break down their egos and remind them who’s really in charge.

It’s a little bit different from what we expect of our politicians today. And archaeologists, by the way, have also worked at this place Tlaxcala, excavating the remains of the pre-conquest city, and what they found there is really remarkable. Again, the most impressive architecture is not temples and palaces. It’s just the well-appointed residences of ordinary citizens arrayed along these grand terraces overlooking district plazas.

And it’s not just the history of cities that modern archaeological science is turning on its head. We also know now that the history of human societies before the coming of agriculture is just nothing like what we once imagined. Far from this idea of people living all the time in tiny bands of hunter-gatherers, actually, what we see these days is evidence for a really wild variety of social experimentation before the coming of farming.

In Africa, 50,000 years ago, hunter-gatherers were already creating huge networks, social networks, covering large parts of the continent. In Ice Age Europe, 25,000 years ago, we see evidence of individuals singled out for special grand burials, their bodies suffused with ornamentation, weapons, and even what looked like regalia. We see public buildings constructed on the bones and tusks of woolly mammoth. And around 11,000 years ago, back in the Middle East, where I started, hunter-gatherers constructed enormous stone temples at a place called Gobekli Tepe in eastern Turkey. In North America, long before the coming of maize farming, indigenous populations created the massive earthworks of poverty point in Louisiana, capable of hosting hunter-gatherer publics in their thousands. And then Japan, again, long before the arrival of rice farming, the storehouses of Sannai Maruyama could already hold great surpluses of wild plant foods.

Now what do all these details amount to? What does it all mean? Well, at the very least, I’d suggest it’s really a bit far-fetched these days to cling to this notion that the invention of agriculture meant a departure from some egalitarian Eden. Or to cling to the idea that small-scale societies are especially likely to be egalitarian, while large-scale ones must necessarily have kings, presidents, and top-down structures of management.

And there are also some contemporary implications. Take, for example, the commonplace notion that participatory democracy is somehow natural in a small community. Or perhaps an activist group, but couldn’t possibly have a scale-up for anything like a city, a nation, or even a region. Well, actually, the evidence of human history, if we’re prepared to look at it, suggests the opposite. If cities and regional confederacies, held together mostly by consensus and cooperation existed thousands of years ago, who’s to stop us creating them again today with technologies that allow us to overcome the friction of distance and numbers?

Perhaps it’s not too late to begin learning from all this new evidence of the human past, even to begin imagining what other kinds of civilization we might create if we can just stop telling ourselves that this particular world is the only one possible. Thank you very much.

「人類の歴史と不平等の根源についての新たな理解(A New Understanding of Human History and the Roots of Inequality)」の和訳

2014年の夏、私はイラクのクルディスタンに小さな考古学者のチームと一緒にいました。私たちは、国境の町ハラブジャ近くでの発掘シーズンを終えようとしていました。私たちのプロジェクトは、私が考古学を学び始めて以来、ずっと興味を抱いてきた謎に取り組んでいました。

私たちは、何千年も前に私たちの祖先がその地域で初めて農業を発明したとき、それが私たちの現代世界を特定の方向に、特定のコースに導く一連の結果を引き起こしたと信じるように教えられています。小麦を栽培することで、私たちの祖先は住んでいる土地に新しい愛着を持つようになり、私有財産が発明されました。そして、それを守る必要が生じました。余剰を蓄積する新しい機会と共に、新たな労働需要が生まれ、多くの人々が作物を育てる厳しい体制に縛られ、一部の特権階級だけが自由と他のことをする余裕を得るようになりました。考えること、実験すること、そして私たちが文明と呼ぶものの基盤を築くことです。

このおなじみの話によれば、次に起こったことは、人口が急増し、村が町に、町が都市に変わり、都市の出現と共に、私たちの種族は今日私たちが目にするような恐ろしい不平等と密接に結びついた発展の道に閉じ込められました。しかし、中東の証拠を見たことがある人なら誰でもわかるように、私が今言ったことのほとんどは実際には真実ではありません。そして、私が提案しようとしている結果は非常に深いものです。

実際、農業が発明された後の約1万年前のことですが、その後の約4,000年間、村はほとんど村のままでした。そして、厳格な社会階級が出現したという証拠はほとんどありません。とはいえ、何も起こらなかったわけではありません。その4,000年間にわたって、技術的な変化は実際に進行しました。王も、官僚も、常備軍もいない中で、これらの初期の農業集団は数学の知識や高度な金属加工技術の発展を促しました。彼らはオリーブやブドウ、ナツメヤシの栽培を学び、発酵パンやビールを発明し、陶器のろくろや帆などの織物技術を開発しました。そして、これらの革新を東地中海の海岸から黒海に至るまで、またペルシャ湾から私たちの発掘が行われたクルディスタンの山々に至るまで、広範囲に広めました。

私はしばしば、この長い人類史の時期を半ば冗談で「最初のグローバルビレッジの時代」と呼んでいます。それは、技術革新だけでなく、人々が中心を形成せず、誰かが他のすべての人々の上に立つことなくこれらのことを成し遂げることを可能にした社会的革新も注目に値するからです。

しかし、奇妙なことに、この文化の開花期は、私たちが通常「文明」と呼ぶものではありません。

代わりに、その言葉は通常、数千年後に現れた厳しく不平等な社会を指すために使われます。王朝時代のメソポタミア、ファラオのエジプト、帝国ローマなど、深く階層化された社会です。

要するに、私は常に私たちの文明の概念には基本的に何か奇妙なものがあると感じていました。何千年にもわたって人々が農業を実践し、新しい技術を創造しながらも、互いに支配したり、最大限に搾取したりしていなかったときに、私たちが言葉に詰まってしまうようなものです。なぜ私たちにはより良い言葉がないのでしょうか?なぜそのような長い人類史の期間を表現する語彙がないのでしょうか?

過去10年以上にわたり、私は偉大な人類学者である故デイヴィッド・グレーバーと密接に協力して、これらの質問に取り組んできました。しかし、私たちはこれをはるかに大きな規模で行いました。なぜなら、考古学者と人類学者の視点から見ると、理論とデータの間のこの衝突、人類の歴史の標準的な物語と現在我々が持っている証拠の間の衝突は、初期の中東に限られたものではないからです。それはすべてのことに関わっています。私たちが何世紀にもわたって語り続けてきた人類の歴史の全体像が、基本的に間違っているのです。

なぜそうなのか、いくつかの理由を説明してみます。まず、数百年にわたり世界の歴史理解を整理し、調整するための安定した基準点であるいくつかの核心的な概念に戻ってみましょう。例えば、人類の歴史の大部分において、人類は小さな平等主義の狩猟採集者集団として生活していたという概念です。そして、農業の到来が不平等の新しい時代をもたらしたという概念です。

また、都市の出現に伴い、社会階級、神聖な王、他の人々を踏みつける略奪的な寡頭政治が生まれたという概念です。最初の歴史の授業から、私たちは現代の世界、すべての利点や便利さ、現代の医療、宇宙旅行、すべての良いことや興奮することは、人類がより大きな単位に集中し、それに伴う不平等の絶え間ない増大なしには存在しえなかったと信じるように教えられます。不平等は文明の必要な代償だったと教えられるのです。

もしそうなら、初期の中東についてどう考えるべきでしょうか?おそらく、これらの発展が起こるまでには非常に非常に長い遅れがあった、4,000年もの遅れがあったと言うかもしれません。不平等は起こるべくして起こったのだと。それは時間の問題だったと。そして、おそらく他の地域に対する話は依然として成り立つかもしれません。

では、都市の起源について今日実際に何が言えるか、少し考えてみましょう。確かに、都市の出現と共に社会階級が出現したと考えるかもしれません。古代エジプトのピラミッド神殿を思い浮かべてください。あるいは、豪華な墓を持つ殷王朝の中国。戦闘的な支配者を持つ古典的なマヤ文明。ミイラ化された王や女王を持つインカ帝国。

しかし、実際のところ、現代の考古学が示す絵はそれほど明確ではありません。例えば、現代の考古学が教えてくれるのは、殷王朝の興起の1,000年以上前に、すでに黄河下流域には都市が存在していたということです。そして太平洋の反対側、ペルーのリオ・スペでは、インカの4,000年前にすでに巨大な人々の集まりと記念建築が見られます。

南アジアでは、4,500年前にインダス川流域のモヘンジョダロやハラッパのような場所で最初の都市が現れました。しかし、これらの巨大な集落には、王や女王の証拠はありません。王室の記念碑も、誇大な芸術もありません。それどころか、人口の多くが高品質な住居に住み、優れた衛生設備を持っていたことがわかっています。

黒海の北、現在のウクライナでは、さらに古い都市の証拠が6,000年前に遡るものが発見されています。そして再び、これらの巨大な集落には、権威主義的な統治の証拠はありません。神殿も宮殿もなく、中央の貯蔵施設や上からの官僚制の証拠すらありません。実際、これらのケースで見られるのは、まるで木の幹の内部のように近隣の集会場を中心に同心円状に配置された家々です。そして、この状態は約800年間続きました。

つまり、古代ギリシャで民主主義が誕生するずっと前に、すでに世界のいくつかの大陸には、支配王朝の証拠がない、よく組織された都市が存在していたということです。そして、一部の都市は、司祭や官僚、戦士政治家なしで完璧に機能していたようです。もちろん、一部の初期の都市は王国や帝国の首都へと発展していきましたが、他の都市は完全に逆の方向に進んだことを覚えておくことが重要です。

一つのよく知られた例を挙げると、紀元250年頃、メキシコのテオティワカンという都市は、人口約10万人を擁し、ピラミッド神殿や人身供犠を捨てて、都市の大部分の住民が住む快適なヴィラの広大な集合体として再構築されました。考古学者が最初にこれらの建物を調査したとき、彼らはそれらが宮殿だと思っていました。しかし、都市のほぼすべての住民が広々としたパティオや地下排水施設、美しい壁画のある宮殿に住んでいたことが明らかになりました。

ただし、誇張してはいけません。私が述べているどの社会も完全に平等主義だったわけではありません。しかし、第五世紀のアテネが民主主義の発祥地とされる一方で、アテネもまた奴隷制に基づく軍事的な社会であり、女性は政治から完全に排除されていたことを思い出すべきです。それと比較すれば、テオティワカンのような場所は不平等の魔法を瓶の中に保つのにそれほど悪くなかったのかもしれません。

しかし、これらすべてを無視して、目をそらすこともできるかもしれません。私が話していることは基本的に例外的なものだと考えることもできるでしょう。文明のなじみのある物語をそのまま保つことができるかもしれません。結局のところ、支配者のいない都市が人類の歴史において本当にそんなに一般的なものであったなら、なぜコルテスやピサロ、他のすべてのコンキスタドールたちはアメリカ大陸への侵略を始めたときにそのような都市を見つけなかったのでしょうか?なぜ彼らはモクテスマやアタウアルパが帝国を支配しているのを見つけただけだったのでしょうか?

しかし、それも真実ではありません。実際にエルナン・コルテスがアステカの首都テノチティトランへの攻撃を成功させるための軍事同盟を見つけた都市は、まさに支配者のいない都市の一つでした。トラスカラという名前の先住民の共和国で、都市議会によって統治されていました。ここでは、政治家志望者に対して非常に興味深い儀式が行われていました。定期的に鞭打たれ、選挙民からの公然の虐待を受けることで、エゴを取り除き、誰が本当に権力を握っているのかを思い出させるというものでした。

これは、今日の私たちが政治家に期待するものとは少し異なります。ちなみに、考古学者たちはこのトラスカラでも発掘を行い、征服前の都市の遺跡を調査しました。そこで見つかったものは本当に驚くべきものでした。再び、最も印象的な建築物は神殿や宮殿ではなく、地区広場を見下ろす壮大なテラスに沿って並んだ普通の市民のよく整備された住居でした。

現代の考古学が覆すのは都市の歴史だけではありません。農業が始まる以前の人間社会の歴史も、私たちがかつて想像していたものとは全く違います。人々が小さな狩猟採集者の集団で常に生活していたという考えからは程遠く、実際に見られるのは、農業が始まる前の非常に多様な社会実験の証拠です。

アフリカでは5万年前に狩猟採集者が大陸の広範囲を覆う巨大な社会ネットワークを作り上げていました。氷河期のヨーロッパでは2万5千年前に、特別な壮大な埋葬を受けた個人の証拠が見られ、その遺体は装飾品や武器、さらには王権のように見えるものに満たされていました。ウーリーマンモスの骨や牙で建設された公共建築物も見られます。そして、1万1千年前には、私が最初に述べた中東で、狩猟採集者がトルコ東部のゴベクリ・テペという場所に巨大な石の神殿を建設しました。北アメリカでは、トウモロコシ農業が到来するずっと前に、先住民の集団がルイジアナ州のポバティポイントで巨大な土木工事を行い、数千人の狩猟採集者の公衆を収容できる場所を作り上げました。そして日本では、稲作が到来するずっと前に、三内丸山の倉庫はすでに野生植物食品の大量貯蔵が可能でした。

さて、これらの詳細は何を意味するのでしょうか?少なくとも、農業の発明が平等主義のエデンからの脱却を意味するという考えに固執するのは、今や少し無理があるのではないでしょうか。また、小規模な社会が特に平等主義である可能性が高く、大規模な社会は必然的に王や大統領、上からの管理構造を持たなければならないという考えに固執することも同様です。

さらに、これには現代の問題にも影響があります。例えば、参加型民主主義が小さなコミュニティでは自然なものであるが、都市、国家、さらには地域規模のものには拡大できないという一般的な考えを考えてみてください。しかし、人類の歴史の証拠を見てみると、実際にはその逆が示唆されています。もし何千年も前に合意と協力を基盤に持つ都市や地域連合が存在したならば、距離や人数の摩擦を克服する技術がある現代において、それを再び創り出すことを妨げるものは何もありません。

これらの新しい過去の証拠から学び始めるのは遅すぎることはないかもしれません。もしこの特定の世界が唯一の可能な世界だと自分たちに言い聞かせるのをやめることができれば、私たちが創り出すことのできる他の文明の形を想像し始めることさえできるかもしれません。ご清聴ありがとうございました。

コメント

タイトルとURLをコピーしました