妊娠と出産の心理的変化に名前をつけよう「マトレッセンス」とは?

健康

When a baby is born, so is a mother — but the natural (and sometimes unsteady) process of transition to motherhood is often silenced by shame or misdiagnosed as postpartum depression. In this quick, informative talk, reproductive psychiatrist Alexandra Sacks breaks down the emotional tug-of-war of becoming a new mother — and shares a term that could help describe it: matrescence.

赤ちゃんが生まれると、母親も生まれます。しかし、母親への移行プロセスは自然でありながら時に不安定であり、産後うつと誤診されたり、恥ずかしさによって沈黙させられることがあります。

この素早く情報を提供するトークで、生殖精神医学者のアレクサンドラ・サックスが、新しい母親になることの感情的な葛藤を解説し、それを説明するのに役立つ用語を共有します:マトレセンス。

タイトル A new way to think about the transition to motherhood
母性への移行についての新しい考え方
スピーカー アレクサンドラ・サックス
アップロード 2018/09/21

「母性への移行についての新しい考え方(A new way to think about the transition to motherhood)」の文字起こし

Do you remember a time when you felt hormonal and moody?
Your skin was breaking out,
your body was growing in strange places and very fast,
and at the same time,
people were expecting you to be grown-up in this new way.
Teenagers, right?

Well, these same changes happen to a woman when she’s having a baby.
And we know that it’s normal for teenagers to feel all over the place,
so why don’t we talk about pregnancy in the same way?

There are entire textbooks written about the developmental arc of adolescence,
and we don’t even have a word to describe the transition to motherhood.
We need one.

I’m a psychiatrist who works with pregnant and postpartum women,
a reproductive psychiatrist,
and in the decade that I’ve been working in this field,
I’ve noticed a pattern.
It goes something like this:
a woman calls me up,
she’s just had a baby,
and she’s concerned.
She says, “I’m not good at this. I’m not enjoying this.
Do I have postpartum depression?”

So I go through the symptoms of that diagnosis,
and it’s clear to me that she’s not clinically depressed,
and I tell her that.
But she isn’t reassured.
“It isn’t supposed to feel like this,” she insists.

So I say, “OK. What did you expect it to feel like?”
She says, “I thought motherhood would make feel whole and happy.
I thought my instincts would naturally tell me what to do.
I thought I’d always want to put the baby first.”

This — this is an unrealistic expectation
of what the transition to motherhood feels like.
And it wasn’t just her.
I was getting calls with questions like this from hundreds of women,
all concerned that something was wrong,
because they couldn’t measure up.

And I didn’t know how to help them,
because telling them that they weren’t sick
wasn’t making them feel better.
I wanted to find a way to normalize this transition,
to explain that discomfort is not always the same thing as disease.

So I set out to learn more about the psychology of motherhood.
But there actually wasn’t much in the medical textbooks,
because doctors mostly write about disease.
So I turned to anthropology.

And it took me two years, but in an out-of-print essay
written in 1973 by Dana Raphael,
I finally found a helpful way to frame this conversation:
matrescence.

It’s not a coincidence that “matrescence” sounds like “adolescence.”
Both are times when body morphing and hormone shifting
lead to an upheaval in how a person feels emotionally
and how they fit into the world.

And like adolescence, matrescence is not a disease,
but since it’s not in the medical vocabulary,
since doctors aren’t educating people about it,
it’s being confused with a more serious condition
called postpartum depression.

I’ve been building on the anthropology literature
and have been talking about matrescence with my patients
using a concept called the “push and pull.”

Here’s the pull part.
As humans, our babies are uniquely dependent.
Unlike other animals, our babies can’t walk,
they can’t feed themselves,
they’re very hard to take care of.
So evolution has helped us out with this hormone called oxytocin.
It’s released around childbirth
and also during skin-to-skin touch,
so it rises even if you didn’t give birth to the baby.

Oxytocin helps a human mother’s brain zoom in, pulling her attention in,
so that the baby is now at the center of her world.
But at the same time, her mind is pushing away,
because she remembers there are all these other parts to her identity —
other relationships,
her work,
hobbies,
a spiritual and intellectual life,
not to mention physical needs:
to sleep, to eat, to exercise,
to have sex,
to go to the bathroom,
alone —

if possible.

This is the emotional tug-of-war of matrescence.
This is the tension the women calling me were feeling.
It’s why they thought they were sick.
If women understood the natural progression of matrescence,
if they knew that most people found it hard to live inside this push and pull,
if they knew that under these circumstances,
ambivalence was normal and nothing to be ashamed of,
they would feel less alone,
they would feel less stigmatized,
and I think it would even reduce rates of postpartum depression.
I’d love to study that one day.

I’m a believer in talk therapy,
so if we’re going to change the way our culture understands
this transition to motherhood,
women need to be talking to each other,
not just me.

So mothers, talk about your matrescence
with other mothers, with your friends,
and, if you have one, with your partner,
so that they can understand their own transition
and better support you.
But it’s not just about protecting your relationship.
When you preserve a separate part of your identity,
you’re also leaving room for your child to develop their own.

When a baby is born, so is a mother,
each unsteady in their own way.
Matrescence is profound,
but it’s also hard,
and that’s what makes it human.
Thank you.

「母性への移行についての新しい考え方(A new way to think about the transition to motherhood)」の和訳

ホルモンの影響で気分が不安定だった時のことを覚えていますか?
肌が荒れたり、体が急速に変化したり、
その一方で、人々はあなたに新しい方法で大人になることを期待していました。
まさにティーンエイジャーの頃ですよね?

さて、同じような変化が女性が赤ちゃんを産むときにも起こります。
私たちは、ティーンエイジャーが感情の浮き沈みを感じるのが普通だと知っていますが、なぜ妊娠についても同じように話さないのでしょうか?

思春期の発達について書かれた教科書は山ほどありますが、母親への移行について説明する言葉さえありません。
私たちはその言葉を必要としています。

私は妊娠中および産後の女性と仕事をしている精神科医、つまり生殖精神科医です。
この分野で10年間働いてきて、あるパターンに気づきました。
それはこんな感じです:
ある女性が私に電話をかけてきて、赤ちゃんを産んだばかりで心配していると言います。
「私はこれが得意ではない。楽しんでいない。産後うつでしょうか?」

その診断の症状を確認すると、彼女が臨床的にうつ病ではないことは明らかです。
そのことを伝えると、彼女は安心しません。
「こんな感じがするはずがないんです」と主張します。

そこで私は尋ねます。「では、どのように感じると思っていましたか?」
彼女は言います。「母親になったら、満たされて幸せになると思っていました。自然に本能が何をすべきか教えてくれると思っていました。常に赤ちゃんを優先したいと思うと思っていました。」

これは、母親への移行がどのように感じられるかについての非現実的な期待です。そして、彼女だけではありませんでした。同じような質問を抱える女性たちから何百もの電話がかかってきました。みんな、自分がうまくいっていないことに不安を感じていました。

彼女たちが病気ではないと伝えても、彼女たちの気持ちはよくなりませんでした。この移行を正常化する方法を見つけたかったのです。不快感が必ずしも病気と同じではないことを説明するために。

そこで私は母親の心理学についてもっと学ぶことにしました。しかし、医学の教科書にはあまり多くの情報がありませんでした。なぜなら、医者は主に病気について書くからです。そこで私は人類学に目を向けました。

それに2年かかりましたが、1973年にダナ・ラファエルが書いた絶版のエッセイの中で、この対話を構築するのに役立つ方法をついに見つけました:マトレッセンス。

「マトレッセンス」が「アドレッセンス(思春期)」に似ているのは偶然ではありません。どちらも体の変形とホルモンの変動が感情的にどう感じるか、世界にどう適応するかに大きな変動をもたらす時期です。

そして、アドレッセンス(思春期)と同様に、マトレッセンスも病気ではありません。しかし、医療用語に入っていないため、医者がそれについて教育していないため、より深刻な状態である産後うつと混同されています。

私は人類学の文献に基づいて、患者に「プッシュ・アンド・プル(引きと押し)」という概念を使ってマトレッセンスについて話しています。

ここが引きの部分です。人間の赤ちゃんは特に依存的です。他の動物とは違い、赤ちゃんは歩けず、自分で食べられず、とても世話が大変です。進化はこの問題を解決するためにオキシトシンというホルモンを用意しました。これは出産の前後に、また肌と肌が触れ合うときに分泌されるため、たとえ赤ちゃんを産んでいなくても上昇します。

オキシトシンは人間の母親の脳に焦点を絞らせ、注意を赤ちゃんに引き寄せます。これにより、赤ちゃんが母親の世界の中心になるのです。しかし、同時に彼女の心は押し返します。なぜなら、彼女は自分のアイデンティティの他の部分を覚えているからです。他の人間関係、仕事、趣味、精神的および知的な生活、そして、食事、運動、セックス、トイレなどの身体的な必要もあります。

できれば一人で。

これがマトレッセンスの感情的な綱引きです。これが、私に電話をかけてきた女性たちが感じていた緊張です。彼女たちが病気だと思った理由です。もし女性たちがマトレッセンスの自然な進行を理解し、この引きと押しの中で多くの人が生きづらさを感じていることを知り、この状況下では両義性が普通であり、恥じることではないと知っていれば、彼女たちは孤独を感じることが少なくなり、スティグマを感じることも少なくなるでしょう。そして、それが産後うつの発症率を減らすことにもつながると私は考えています。いつかそれを研究してみたいです。

私はトークセラピーの信奉者です。ですから、私たちの文化が母親への移行を理解する方法を変えるためには、女性たちがお互いに話すことが必要です。私だけではなく。

だから、母親たち、他の母親たちと、自分の友人たちと、もしパートナーがいればパートナーと、自分のマトレッセンスについて話してください。そうすれば、彼らも自分の移行を理解し、あなたをよりよくサポートすることができます。しかし、それは単に関係を保護するためだけではありません。自分のアイデンティティの一部を保つことで、子供が自分自身を発展させる余地も残しているのです。

赤ちゃんが生まれると同時に母親も生まれます。それぞれが自分なりに不安定です。マトレッセンスは深遠ですが、それと同時に困難でもあります。そして、それが人間的なものなのです。ありがとうございました。

タイトルとURLをコピーしました