アイデアの多様化を促進するスローモーション・マルチタスクのすすめ

自己啓発

What can we learn from the world’s most enduringly creative people? They “slow-motion multitask,” actively juggling multiple projects and moving between topics as the mood strikes — without feeling hurried. Author Tim Harford shares how innovators like Einstein, Darwin, Twyla Tharp and Michael Crichton found their inspiration and productivity through cross-training their minds.

世界で最も持続的に創造的な人々から何を学ぶことができるのでしょうか?彼らは「スローモーションでマルチタスク」を行い、複数のプロジェクトを積極的に並行して処理し、気分が来たときにトピックを移動させます – 急かされることなく。

著者のティム・ハーフォードは、アインシュタイン、ダーウィン、トワイラ・サープ、マイケル・クライトンなどの革新者が、彼らのインスピレーションと生産性を、マインドのクロストレーニングを通じてどのように見つけたかを共有しています。

タイトル A powerful way to unleash your natural creativity
本来の創造性を解き放つ強力な方法
スピーカー ティム・ハーフォード
アップロード 2019/02/08

「本来の創造性を解き放つ強力な方法(A powerful way to unleash your natural creativity)」の文字起こし

“To do two things at once is to do neither.”
It’s a great smackdown of multitasking, isn’t it,
often attributed to the Roman writer Publilius Syrus,
although you know how these things are, he probably never said it.
What I’m interested in, though, is — is it true?
I mean, it’s obviously true for emailing at the dinner table
or texting while driving or possibly for live tweeting at TED Talk, as well.
But I’d like to argue that for an important kind of activity,
doing two things at once — or three or even four —
is exactly what we should be aiming for.

Look no further than Albert Einstein.
In 1905, he published four remarkable scientific papers.
One of them was on Brownian motion,
it provided empirical evidence that atoms exist,
and it laid out the basic mathematics behind most of financial economics.
Another one was on the theory of special relativity.
Another one was on the photoelectric effect,
that’s why solar panels work, it’s a nice one.
Gave him the Nobel prize for that one.
And the fourth introduced an equation you might have heard of:
E equals mc squared.
So, tell me again how you shouldn’t do several things at once.

Now, obviously, working simultaneously
on Brownian motion, special relativity and the photoelectric effect —
it’s not exactly the same kind of multitasking
as Snapchatting while you’re watching “Westworld.”
Very different.
And Einstein, yeah, well, Einstein’s — he’s Einstein,
he’s one of a kind, he’s unique.
But the pattern of behavior that Einstein was demonstrating,
that’s not unique at all.
It’s very common among highly creative people,
both artists and scientists,
and I’d like to give it a name:
slow-motion multitasking.

Slow-motion multitasking feels like a counterintuitive idea.
What I’m describing here
is having multiple projects on the go at the same time,
and you move backwards and forwards between topics as the mood takes you,
or as the situation demands.
But the reason it seems counterintuitive
is because we’re used to lapsing into multitasking out of desperation.
We’re in a hurry, we want to do everything at once.
If we were willing to slow multitasking down,
we might find that it works quite brilliantly.

Sixty years ago, a young psychologist by the name of Bernice Eiduson
began a long research project
into the personalities and the working habits
of 40 leading scientists.
Einstein was already dead,
but four of her subjects won Nobel prizes,
including Linus Pauling and Richard Feynman.
The research went on for decades,
in fact, it continued even after professor Eiduson herself had died.
And one of the questions that it answered
was, “How is it that some scientists are able to go on producing important work
right through their lives?”
What is it about these people?
Is it their personality, is it their skill set,
their daily routines, what?

Well, a pattern that emerged was clear, and I think to some people surprising.
The top scientists kept changing the subject.
They would shift topics repeatedly
during their first 100 published research papers.

Do you want to guess how often?
Three times?
Five times?
No. On average, the most enduringly creative scientists
switched topics 43 times in their first 100 research papers.
Seems that the secret to creativity is multitasking
in slow motion.
Eiduson’s research suggests we need to reclaim multitasking
and remind ourselves how powerful it can be.
And she’s not the only person to have found this.
Different researchers,
using different methods to study different highly creative people
have found that very often they have multiple projects in progress
at the same time,
and they’re also far more likely than most of us to have serious hobbies.
Slow-motion multitasking among creative people is ubiquitous.

So, why?
I think there are three reasons.
And the first is the simplest.
Creativity often comes when you take an idea from its original context
and you move it somewhere else.
It’s easier to think outside the box
if you spend your time clambering from one box into another.
For an example of this, consider the original eureka moment.
Archimedes — he’s wrestling with a difficult problem.
And he realizes, in a flash,
he can solve it, using the displacement of water.
And if you believe the story,
this idea comes to him as he’s taking a bath,
lowering himself in, and he’s watching the water level rise and fall.
And if solving a problem while having a bath isn’t multitasking,
I don’t know what is.

The second reason that multitasking can work
is that learning to do one thing well
can often help you do something else.
Any athlete can tell you about the benefits of cross-training.
It’s possible to cross-train your mind, too.
A few years ago, researchers took 18 randomly chosen medical students
and they enrolled them in a course at the Philadelphia Museum of Art,
where they learned to criticize and analyze works of visual art.
And at the end of the course,
these students were compared with a control group
of their fellow medical students.
And the ones who had taken the art course
had become substantially better at performing tasks
such as diagnosing diseases of the eye by analyzing photographs.
They’d become better eye doctors.
So if we want to become better at what we do,
maybe we should spend some time doing something else,
even if the two fields appear to be as completely distinct
as ophthalmology and the history of art.

And if you’d like an example of this,
should we go for a less intimidating example than Einstein? OK.
Michael Crichton, creator of “Jurassic Park” and “E.R.”
So in the 1970s, he originally trained as a doctor,
but then he wrote novels
and he directed the original “Westworld” movie.
But also, and this is less well-known,
he also wrote nonfiction books,
about art, about medicine, about computer programming.
So in 1995, he enjoyed the fruits of all this variety
by penning the world’s most commercially successful book.
And the world’s most commercially successful TV series.
And the world’s most commercially successful movie.
In 1996, he did it all over again.

There’s a third reason
why slow-motion multitasking can help us solve problems.
It can provide assistance when we’re stuck.
This can’t happen in an instant.
So, imagine that feeling of working on a crossword puzzle
and you can’t figure out the answer,
and the reason you can’t is because the wrong answer is stuck in your head.
It’s very easy — just go and do something else.
You know, switch topics, switch context,
you’ll forget the wrong answer
and that gives the right answer space to pop into the front of your mind.

But on the slower timescale that interests me, being stuck is a much more serious thing. You get turned down for funding. Your cell cultures won’t grow, your rockets keep crashing. Nobody wants to publish your fantasy novel about a school for wizards. Or maybe you just can’t find the solution to the problem that you’re working on. And being stuck like that means stasis, stress, possibly even depression. But if you have another exciting, challenging project to work on, being stuck on one is just an opportunity to do something else. We could all get stuck sometimes, even Albert Einstein.

Ten years after the original, miraculous year that I described, Einstein was putting together the pieces of his theory of general relativity, his greatest achievement. And he was exhausted. And so he turned to an easier problem. He proposed the stimulated emission of radiation. Which, as you may know, is the S in laser. So he’s laying down the theoretical foundation for the laser beam, and then, while he’s doing that, he moves back to general relativity, and he’s refreshed. He sees what the theory implies — that the universe isn’t static. It’s expanding. It’s an idea so staggering, Einstein can’t bring himself to believe it for years. Look, if you get stuck and you get the ball rolling on laser beams, you’re in pretty good shape.

So, that’s the case for slow-motion multitasking. And I’m not promising that it’s going to turn you into Einstein. I’m not even promising it’s going to turn you into Michael Crichton. But it is a powerful way to organize our creative lives. But there’s a problem. How do we stop all of these projects becoming completely overwhelming? How do we keep all these ideas straight in our minds?

Well, here’s a simple solution, a practical solution from the great American choreographer, Twyla Tharp. Over the last few decades, she’s blurred boundaries, mixed genres, won prizes, danced to the music of everybody, from Philip Glass to Billy Joel. She’s written three books. I mean, she’s a slow-motion multitasker, of course she is. She says, “You have to be all things. Why exclude? You have to be everything.” And Tharp’s method for preventing all of these different projects from becoming overwhelming is a simple one. She gives each project a big cardboard box, writes the name of the project on the side of the box. And into it, she tosses DVDs and books, magazine cuttings, theater programs, physical objects, really anything that’s provided a source of creative inspiration. And she writes, “The box means I never have to worry about forgetting. One of the biggest fears for a creative person is that some brilliant idea will get lost because you didn’t write it down and put it in a safe place. I don’t worry about that. Because I know where to find it. It’s all in the box.” You can manage many ideas like this, either in physical boxes or in their digital equivalents.

So, I would like to urge you to embrace the art of slow-motion multitasking. Not because you’re in a hurry, but because you’re in no hurry at all. And I want to give you one final example, my favorite example. Charles Darwin.

A man whose slow-burning multitasking is so staggering, I need a diagram to explain it all to you. We know what Darwin was doing at different times, because the creativity researchers Howard Gruber and Sara Davis have analyzed his diaries and his notebooks. So, when he left school, age of 18, he was initially interested in two fields, zoology and geology. Pretty soon, he signed up to be the onboard naturalist on the “Beagle.” This is the ship that eventually took five years to sail all the way around the southern oceans of the Earth, stopping at the Galapagos, passing through the Indian ocean. While he was on the “Beagle,” he began researching coral reefs. This is a great synergy between his two interests in zoology and geology, and it starts to get him thinking about slow processes.

But when he gets back from the voyage, his interests start to expand even further: psychology, botany; for the rest of his life, he’s moving backwards and forwards between these different fields. He never quite abandons any of them. In 1837, he begins work on two very interesting projects. One of them: earthworms. The other, a little notebook which he titles “The transmutation of species.” Then, Darwin starts studying my field, economics. He reads a book by the economist Thomas Malthus. And he has his eureka moment. In a flash, he realizes how species could emerge and evolve slowly, through this process of the survival of the fittest. It all comes to him, he writes it all down, every single important element of the theory of evolution, in that notebook.

But then, a new project. His son William is born. Well, there’s a natural experiment right there, you get to observe the development of a human infant. So immediately, Darwin starts making notes. Now, of course, he’s still working on the theory of evolution and the development of the human infant. But during all of this, he realizes he doesn’t really know enough about taxonomy. So he starts studying that. And in the end, he spends eight years becoming the world’s leading expert on barnacles. Then, “Natural Selection.” A book that he’s to continue working on for his entire life, he never finishes it.

“Origin of Species” is finally published 20 years after Darwin set out all the basic elements. Then, the “Descent of Man,” controversial book. And then, the book about the development of the human infant. The one that was inspired when he could see his son, William, crawling on the sitting room floor in front of him. When the book was published, William was 37 years old. And all this time, Darwin’s working on earthworms. He fills his billiard room with earthworms in pots, with glass covers. He shines lights on them, to see if they’ll respond. He holds a hot poker next to them, to see if they move away. He chews tobacco and — He blows on the earthworms to see if they have a sense of smell. He even plays the bassoon at the earthworms.

I like to think of this great man when he’s tired, he’s stressed, he’s anxious about the reception of his book “The Descent of Man.” You or I might log into Facebook or turn on the television. Darwin would go into the billiard room to relax by studying the earthworms intensely.

And that’s why it’s appropriate that one of his last great works is the “Formation of Vegetable Mould Through The Action of Worms.” He worked upon that book for 44 years. We don’t live in the 19th century anymore. I don’t think any of us could sit on our creative or scientific projects for 44 years. But we do have something to learn from the great slow-motion multitaskers. From Einstein and Darwin to Michael Crichton and Twyla Tharp.

The modern world seems to present us with a choice. If we’re not going to fast-twitch from browser window to browser window, we have to live like a hermit, focus on one thing to the exclusion of everything else. I think that’s a false dilemma. We can make multitasking work for us, unleashing our natural creativity. We just need to slow it down. So … Make a list of your projects. Put down your phone. Pick up a couple of cardboard boxes. And get to work. Thank you very much.

「本来の創造性を解き放つ強力な方法(A powerful way to unleash your natural creativity)」の和訳

一度に二つのことをすることは、どちらもうまくいかないということです。
これは、マルチタスキングを否定する名言ですね。
ローマの作家プブリリウス・シルスの言葉とされていますが、
そういうものは本当の出典がわからないこともあります。
でも、興味深いのは、これが本当かどうかです。
夕食時にメールをすることや、運転中にテキストメッセージを送ること、
TEDトーク中にライブツイートすることなどには、
確かに当てはまるでしょう。
しかし、重要な活動において、
一度に二つのこと、あるいは三つ、四つと行うことが、
実は目指すべきことなのではないかと私は主張したいのです。

アルベルト・アインシュタインを見てみましょう。
1905年に、彼は4つの素晴らしい科学論文を発表しました。
そのうちの1つがブラウン運動に関するもので、
これは原子の存在を実証し、ほとんどの金融経済学の基本的な数学を提供しました。
別の論文では特殊相対性理論、そしてもう1つは光電効果についてで、
これが太陽光パネルが動く原理です、素晴らしいですね。
その論文で彼はノーベル賞を受賞しました。
そして4つ目の論文で、おなじみの式を紹介しましたね、
E=mc2です。
ですから、何度も言いますが、
一度に複数のことをするべきでないとはどうして言えるのでしょうか。

もちろん、ブラウン運動、特殊相対性理論、光電効果について同時に取り組むことは、
「ウエストワールド」を見ながらスナップチャットをすることとは
全く異なるタイプのマルチタスキングです。
全然違いますね。
そして、アインシュタインは、そうですね、アインシュタインです。
彼は唯一無二の存在です。
しかし、アインシュタインが示した行動パターンは、
全く唯一無二のものではありません。
高い創造性を持つ人々、芸術家も科学者も、
非常に一般的です。
そこで、それに名前をつけたいと思います。
スローモーション・マルチタスキング。

スローモーション・マルチタスキングは、直感に反するアイデアのように感じられます。
私がここで説明しているのは、
複数のプロジェクトを同時進行で進めることであり、
気分や状況に応じてトピックを行ったり来たりすることです。
しかし、それが直感に反するように感じる理由は、
必死になってマルチタスキングに陥ることに慣れているからです。
急いでいて、すべてを一度にやりたいと思っています。
もし私たちがマルチタスキングをゆっくりと進める覚悟があれば、
それが非常にうまくいくことに気づくかもしれません。

60年前、若い心理学者バーニス・アイダソンは、
40人の著名な科学者の性格や仕事の習慣についての
長期にわたる研究プロジェクトを開始しました。
アインシュタインは既に亡くなっていましたが、
彼女の対象者の中には、リーナス・ポーリングやリチャード・ファインマンを含む
4人がノーベル賞を受賞しています。
研究は数十年にわたり続けられ、
実際、アイダソン教授自身が亡くなった後も続けられました。
そして、それが答えた質問の1つは、「なぜ一部の科学者は
彼らの一生を通して重要な業績を生み出し続けることができるのか?」
これらの人々には何があるのでしょうか?
それは彼らの人格、それとも彼らのスキルセット、
彼らの日常のルーティン、何なのでしょうか?

さて、浮かび上がったパターンは明確で、ある人々には驚くべきことかもしれません。
トップの科学者たちは、話題を変え続けていました。
彼らは最初の100本の研究論文の間に何度もトピックを切り替えていました。

何回か予想したいですか?
3回?
5回?
いいえ。最も持続的に創造的な科学者は、
最初の100本の研究論文で平均して43回もトピックを切り替えていました。
創造性の秘密は、マルチタスキングのスローモーションにあるようです。
アイダソンの研究は、私たちがマルチタスキングを取り戻し、
それがどれほど強力であるかを思い出す必要があることを示唆しています。
彼女だけがそうだったわけではありません。
異なる研究者が、異なる方法で異なる高度に創造的な人々を研究して、
その人々が多くの場合、同時進行で複数のプロジェクトを進行していることがわかりました。
クリエイティブな人々の間でのスローモーション・マルチタスキングは普遍的です。

では、なぜでしょうか?
私は3つの理由があると思います。
最初の理由は、最も単純なものです。
創造性は、アイデアを元の文脈から取り出し、
別の場所に移動させるときによく生まれます。
もし一つの箱から別の箱に移動し続ける時間を過ごせば、
ボックスの外側で考えることが容易になります。
これを例に挙げてみましょう。オリジナルのユリカの瞬間を考えてみてください。
アルキメデス — 彼は難しい問題に取り組んでいます。
そして、彼はひらめきます。
水の排除を利用してそれを解決できることに気付くのです。
そして、もし物語を信じるならば、
このアイデアは彼が入浴しているときに思いつきます。
彼は自分を浴槽に沈め、水位の上昇と下降を見ているのです。
そして、風呂に入りながら問題を解決することがマルチタスキングではないとしたら、
それ以外の何があるでしょうか。

マルチタスキングが機能する2つ目の理由は、
一つのことをうまくやることを学ぶことが、
他のことをするのに役立つことがよくあるということです。
どんなアスリートも、クロストレーニングの利点について語ることができます。
心のクロストレーニングも可能です。
数年前、研究者たちは18人の無作為に選ばれた医学生を対象にし、
フィラデルフィア美術館でコースに登録させました。
そこで、彼らは視覚芸術作品を批評し分析することを学びました。
コースの最後には、これらの学生たちは
その他の医学生のコントロールグループと比較されました。
美術コースを受講した学生たちは、
写真を分析して眼疾患を診断するなどのタスクを実行する能力が大幅に向上しました。
彼らはより優れた眼科医になったのです。
ですから、私たちが自分のやっていることをより良くしたいのであれば、
おそらく異なることをする時間を取るべきです。
たとえ、眼科学と美術史のようにまったく異なる分野であったとしても。

そして、これの例を挙げてみましょう。
アインシュタインよりも少し気後れしない例にしましょうか?はい。
マイケル・クライトン、『ジュラシック・パーク』や『E.R.』の創造者です。
彼は1970年代に医者として訓練を受けましたが、
その後小説を書き、オリジナルの『ウエストワールド』映画を監督しました。
しかし、これよりもあまり知られていないことは、
彼が非フィクションの書籍も書いたことです。
美術、医学、コンピュータプログラミングについてのものです。
1995年、彼はこの多様性の成果を楽しんで、
商業的に最も成功した本を執筆しました。
そして商業的に最も成功したテレビシリーズ。
そして、商業的に最も成功した映画。
1996年、彼はこれをもう一度やり遂げました。

スローモーション・マルチタスキングが問題解決に役立つ第三の理由があります。
それは、私たちが行き詰まったときに支援を提供できることです。
これは一瞬で起こることではありません。
例えば、クロスワードパズルを解いているときに、答えがわからないという感覚を想像してください。
その理由は、頭の中に間違った答えが詰まっているからです。
とても簡単です — 他のことをやってみましょう。
トピックを変えて、文脈を変えて、
間違った答えを忘れると、正しい答えが頭に浮かぶスペースができます。

しかし、私が興味を持っているよりも遅い時間尺度では、行き詰まることはより深刻な問題です。資金提供が断られる。細胞培養が育たないし、ロケットが墜落し続ける。魔法学校についてのファンタジー小説を誰も出版したがらない。または、単に解決策が見つからない。そのようにして行き詰まることは、停滞、ストレス、おそらくはうつ病を意味します。しかし、刺激的で挑戦的な別のプロジェクトがあれば、1つに詰まっているということは、他のことをする機会になります。時には私たち全員が行き詰まることがあります、アインシュタインでさえも。

私が説明した元の奇跡の年から10年後、アインシュタインは一般相対性理論の要素を組み立てていました、彼の最大の業績です。そして、彼は疲れ果てていました。そして、彼は簡単な問題に取り組みました。彼は放射線の誘導放射を提案しました。これはレーザーの「S」として知られています。彼はレーザービームの理論的な基礎を築き、そしてそれをやっている間に、一般相対性理論に戻り、リフレッシュされました。彼は理論が何を意味するかを見ました — 宇宙は静止していない。拡大しているのです。アインシュタインがそれを信じられなくても、数年間。見てください、もし行き詰まっていて、レーザービームの展開を始めることができたなら、かなりうまくいっているでしょう。

それがスローモーション・マルチタスキングの理由です。そして、あなたがアインシュタインになることを約束しているわけではありません。私は、あなたがマイケル・クライトンになることを約束しているわけでもありません。しかし、これは私たちの創造的な生活を整理する強力な方法です。しかし、問題があります。これらのプロジェクトが完全に圧倒的になるのをどうやって止めるのですか?これらのアイデアを頭の中で整理する方法はどうすればいいですか?

さて、ここに偉大なアメリカの振付家、トワイラ・サープからのシンプルな解決策、実用的な解決策があります。過去数十年間、彼女は境界を曖昧にし、ジャンルを混合し、賞を受賞し、フィリップ・グラスからビリー・ジョエルまでの音楽に合わせて踊りました。彼女は3冊の本を書いています。もちろん、彼女はスローモーション・マルチタスクです。彼女は言います。「あなたはすべてでなければなりません。なぜ除外するのですか?あなたはすべてでなければなりません。」そして、これらの異なるプロジェクトが圧倒的になるのを防ぐサープの方法は、シンプルなものです。彼女は各プロジェクトに大きなダンボール箱を与え、箱の側面にプロジェクトの名前を書きます。そして、DVDや本、雑誌の切り抜き、劇場のプログラム、物理的なオブジェクト、本当にクリエイティブなインスピレーションの源になったもの、本当に何でも入れます。そして、彼女は書いています。「箱があるので、忘れることを心配する必要はありません。クリエイティブな人の最も大きな恐れの1つは、素晴らしいアイデアが書き留められずに消えてしまうことです。私はそのことを心配しません。それはどこにあるかわかっているからです。それはすべて箱の中にあります。」あなたはこれと同じように多くのアイデアを管理できます、物理的な箱に入れるか、そのデジタル版に入れるかです。

ですから、スローモーション・マルチタスキングの技術を取り入れることをお勧めします。急いでいるからではなく、全く急いでいないからです。最後に、私のお気に入りの例、最後の例をお見せしたいと思います。チャールズ・ダーウィンです。

チャールズ・ダーウィンのようなスローなマルチタスクは驚くべきもので、すべてを説明するには図が必要です。彼の日記やノートを分析したクリエイティブリサーチャー、ハワード・グルーバーとサラ・デイビスによって、異なる時期のダーウィンの活動がわかります。18歳の時に学校を卒業すると、彼は最初に動物学と地質学に興味を持ちました。やがて「ビーグル号」の船上自然学者として乗船することになり、5年間かけて地球の南洋を周遊し、ガラパゴス諸島を訪れ、インド洋を通過します。彼は「ビーグル号」に乗船している間に、サンゴ礁の研究を開始します。これは彼の動物学と地質学の2つの興味の素晴らしい相乗効果で、彼をゆっくりしたプロセスについて考えさせるきっかけとなります。

しかし、航海から戻ってきた後、彼の興味はさらに広がり始めました。心理学、植物学など。彼の残りの人生、彼はこれらの異なる分野の間を行き来しています。彼はどれも完全に捨て去ることはありません。1837年、彼は2つの非常に興味深いプロジェクトに取り組み始めます。1つは、ミミズです。もう1つは、彼が「種の変異」(転化)と題した小さなノートブックです。その後、ダーウィンは私の専門である経済学の研究を始めます。彼は経済学者トマス・マルサスの本を読みます。そして、彼はユーレカの瞬間を迎えます。種がどのようにして徐々に現れ進化するか、適者生存のプロセスを通じて、というアイデアが突然彼に明らかになります。彼は全てを理解し、重要な要素を全て、そのノートに書き留めます。

しかし、新しいプロジェクトが始まります。息子のウィリアムが生まれました。まさに自然実験です、人間の幼児の発達を観察する機会です。ダーウィンはすぐにメモを取り始めます。もちろん、彼はまだ進化論と人間の幼児の発達に取り組んでいます。しかし、その間、分類学について十分な知識がないと気づきます。そこで彼はその研究を始めます。最終的に、彼は8年かけて世界有数のカキ殻の専門家になります。そして、「自然淘汰」。彼の人生の間ずっと取り組んできた本ですが、彼はそれを終えることはありませんでした。

「種の起源」は、ダーウィンが基本的な要素をすべて提示してから20年後にようやく出版されました。その後、「人間の由来」、物議を醸す本です。そして、人間の幼児の発達についての本。それは彼が目の前で床に這っている息子のウィリアムを見てインスパイアされたものです。その本が出版されたとき、ウィリアムは37歳でした。そしてその間、ダーウィンはミミズの研究を続けています。彼はビリヤードルームにミミズの入ったポットとガラスカバーを置き、ライトを当てて彼らが反応するかどうかを見ます。彼は彼らのそばで煙草を咥え、ミミズに匂いを感じるかどうかを確認します。彼はさらにベースーンでミミズに演奏します。

私は、この偉大な人が疲れ果て、ストレスを感じ、彼の本「人間の由来」の受け入れに不安を感じているとき、私たちがフェイスブックにログインしたりテレビをつけたりするのに対して、ダーウィンはリラックスするためにビリヤードルームに入り、ミミズを熱心に研究する姿を想像します。

そして、彼の最後の偉大な作品の1つが「ミミズによる植物の土壌の形成」であることは適切です。彼はその本に44年間取り組みました。私たちは19世紀には生きていません。私たちは創造的または科学的なプロジェクトに44年間座り続けることはできないと思います。しかし、アインシュタインからダーウィン、マイケル・クライトン、トワイラ・サープまで、偉大なスローモーション・マルチタスカスターから学ぶべきことがあります。

現代の世界は私たちに選択肢を提示しています。ブラウザのウィンドウを素早く切り替えるのではなく、隠者のように生活して、他のすべてのことを排除して一つのことに集中する。それは誤ったジレンマだと思います。私たちはマルチタスキングを私たちのために機能させることができます、私たちの自然な創造性を解き放ちます。私たちはそれをただ遅くする必要があります。だから…あなたのプロジェクトのリストを作りましょう。スマートフォンを置いて、ダンボール箱を数個持ち上げて、仕事に取り掛かりましょう。ありがとうございました。

コメント

タイトルとURLをコピーしました