持続可能な未来へ新技術が切り拓く有機太陽電池の可能性

エネルギー

Unlike the solar cells you’re used to seeing, organic photovoltaics are made of compounds that are dissolved in ink and can be printed and molded using simple techniques. The result is a low-weight, flexible, semi-transparent film that turns the energy of the sun into electricity. Hannah Bürckstümmer shows us how they’re made — and they how could change the way we power the world.

あなたが見慣れている太陽電池とは異なり、有機光伏素子はインクに溶解された化合物で作られ、単純な技術を使って印刷や成形ができます。その結果、低重量で柔軟性があり、半透明なフィルムができます。

このフィルムは太陽のエネルギーを電気に変えます。ハンナ・ビュルクシュテュンマーは、これらの光伏素子の製造方法を紹介し、それが世界のエネルギー供給方法を変える可能性を示しています。

タイトル A printable, flexible, organic solar cell
印刷可能なフレキシブルな有機太陽電池
スピーカー ハンナ・ビュルクシュテュンマー
アップロード 2018/05/09

「印刷可能なフレキシブルな有機太陽電池(A printable, flexible, organic solar cell)」の文字起こし

You may have noticed that I’m wearing two different shoes.
It probably looks funny —
it definitely feels funny —
but I wanted to make a point.
Let’s say my left shoe corresponds to a sustainable footprint,
meaning we humans consume less natural resources
than our planet can regenerate,
and emit less carbon dioxide than our forests and oceans can reabsorb.
That’s a stable and healthy condition.
Today’s situation is more like my other shoe.
It’s way oversized.
At the second of August in 2017,
we had already consumed all resources our planet can regenerate this year.
This is like spending all your money until the 18th of a month
and then needing a credit from the bank for the rest of the time.
For sure, you can do this for some months in a row,
but if you don’t change your behavior,
sooner or later, you will run into big problems.
We all know the devastating effects of this excessive exploitation:
global warming,
rising of the sea levels,
melting of the glaciers and polar ice,
increasingly extreme climate patterns and more.
The enormity of this problem really frustrates me.
What frustrates me even more is that there are solutions to this,
but we keep doing things like we always did.

Today I want to share with you
how a new solar technology can contribute to a sustainable future of buildings.
Buildings consume about 40 percent of our total energy demand,
so tackling this consumption
would significantly reduce our climate emissions.
A building designed along sustainable principles
can produce all the power it needs by itself.
To achieve this,
you first have to reduce the consumption as much as possible,
by using well-insulated walls or windows, for instance.
These technologies are commercially available.
Then you need energy for warm water and heating.
You can get this in a renewable way from the sun
through solar-thermal installations
or from the ground and air, with heat pumps.
All of these technologies are available.
Then you are left with the need for electricity.
In principle, there are several ways to get renewable electricity,
but how many buildings do you know which have a windmill on the roof
or a water power plant in the garden?
Probably not so many, because usually, it doesn’t make sense.
But the sun provides abundant energy to our roofs and facades.
The potential to harvest this energy at our buildings’ surfaces is enormous.
Let’s take Europe as an example.
If you would utilize all areas which have a nice orientation to the sun
and they’re not overly shaded,
the power generated by photovoltaics
would correspond to about 30 percent of our total energy demand.
But today’s photovoltaics have some issues.
They do offer a good cost-performance ratio,
but they aren’t really flexible in terms of their design,
and this makes aesthetics a challenge.
People often imagine pictures like this
when thinking about solar cells on buildings.
This may work for solar farms,
but when you think of buildings, of streets, of architecture,
aesthetics does matter.
This is the reason why we don’t see many solar cells on buildings today.

Our team is working on a totally different solar-cell technology,
which is called organic photovoltaics or OPV.
The term organic describes
that the material used for light absorption and charge transport
are mainly based on the element carbon, and not on metals.
We utilize the mixture of a polymer
which is set up by different repeating units,
like the pearls in a pearl chain,
and a small molecule which has the shape of a football
and is called fullerene.
These two compounds are mixed and dissolved to become an ink.
And like ink,
they can be printed with simple printing techniques like slot-die coating
in a continuous roll-to-roll process on flexible substrates.
The resulting thin layer is the active layer,
absorbing the energy of the sun.
This active layer is extremely effective.
You only need a layer thickness of 0.2 micrometers
to absorb the energy of the sun.
This is 100 times thinner than a human hair.
To give you another example,
take one kilogram of the basic polymer
and use it to formulate the active ink.
With this amount of ink,
you can print a solar cell the size of a complete football field.
So OPV is extremely material efficient,
which I think is a crucial thing when talking about sustainability.

After the printing process,
you can have a solar module which could look like this …
It looks a bit like a plastic foil
and actually has many of its features.
It’s lightweight …
it’s bendable …
and it’s semi-transparent.
But it can harvest the energy of the sun outdoors
and also of this indoor light,
as you can see with this small, illuminated LED.
You can use it in its plastic form
and take advantage of its low weight and its bendability.
The first is important when thinking about buildings in warmer regions.
Here, the roofs are not designed to bear additionally heavy loads.
They aren’t designed for snow in winter, for instance,
so heavy silicon solar cells cannot be used for light harvesting,
but these lightweight solar foils are very well suited.
The bendability is important
if you want to combine the solar cell with membrane architecture.
Imagine the sails of the Sydney Opera as power plants.
Alternatively, you can combine the solar foils
with conventional construction materials like glass.
Many glass facade elements contain a foil anyway,
to create laminated safety glass.
It’s not a big deal to add a second foil in the production process,
but then the facade element contains the solar cell
and can produce electricity.

Besides looking nice,
these integrated solar cells come along with two more important benefits.
Do you remember the solar cell attached to a roof I showed before?
In this case, we install the roof first,
and as a second layer, the solar cell.
This is adding on the installation costs.
In the case of integrated solar cells,
at the site of construction, only one element is installed,
being at the same time the envelope of the building
and the solar cell.
Besides saving on the installation costs,
this also saves resources,
because the two functions are combined into one element.
Earlier, I’ve talked about optics.
I really like this solar panel —
maybe you have different taste or different design needs …
No problem.

With the printing process,
the solar cell can change its shape and design very easily.
This will give the flexibility to architects,
to planners and building owners,
to integrate this electricity-producing technology as they wish.
I want to stress that this is not just happening in the labs.
It will take several more years to get to mass adoption,
but we are at the edge of commercialization,
meaning there are several companies out there with production lines.
They are scaling up their capacities,
and so are we, with the inks.

This smaller footprint is much more comfortable.

It is the right size, the right scale.
We have to come back to the right scale when it comes to energy consumption.
And making buildings carbon-neutral is an important part here.
In Europe,
we have the goal to decarbonize our building stock [by] 2050.
I hope organic photovoltaics will be a big part of this.
Here are a couple of examples.
This is the first commercial installation of fully printed organic solar cells.
“Commercial” means that the solar cells were printed on industrial equipment.
The so-called “solar trees” were part of the German pavilion
at the World Expo in Milan in 2015.
They provided shading during the day
and electricity for the lighting in the evening.
You may wonder why this hexagonal shape was chosen for the solar cells.
Easy answer:
the architects wanted to have a specific shading pattern on the floor
and asked for it,
and then it was printed as requested.
Being far from a real product,
this free-form installation hooked the imagination of the visiting architects
much more than we expected.
This other application is closer to the projects
and applications we are targeting.
In an office building in Sao Paulo, Brazil,
semitransparent OPV panels are integrated into the glass facade,
serving different needs.
First, they provided shading for the meeting rooms behind.
Second, the logo of the company is displayed in an innovative way.
And of course, electricity is produced,
reducing the energy footprint of the building.
This is pointing towards a future
where buildings are no longer energy consumers,
but energy providers.
I want to see solar cells seamlessly integrated
into our building shells
to be both resource-efficient and a pleasure to look at.
For roofs, silicon solar cells will often continue to be a good solution.
But to exploit the potential of all facades and other areas,
such as semitransparent areas,
curved surfaces and shadings,
I believe organic photovoltaics can offer a significant contribution,
and they can be made in any form architects and planners will want them to.
Thank you.

「印刷可能なフレキシブルな有機太陽電池(A printable, flexible, organic solar cell)」の和訳

皆さん、私が異なる靴を履いているのに気づいたかもしれません。
ちょっと変に見えるでしょうし、
実際に履いていても変な感じがしますが、
これには理由があります。
左の靴は持続可能な足跡を表しているとしましょう。
つまり、私たち人間が消費する自然資源が
地球が再生可能な量より少なく、
私たちが排出する二酸化炭素が
森林や海洋が再吸収できる量より少ないということです。
これは安定した健康的な状態です。

今日の状況はむしろ、私のもう一方の靴に似ています。
非常に大きすぎるのです。
2017年の8月2日時点で、
私たちは今年、地球が再生可能なすべての資源をすでに消費してしまいました。
これは、月の18日までにすべてのお金を使い果たし、
残りの時間のために銀行からのクレジットを必要とするようなものです。
もちろん、数か月連続でこれを行うことはできますが、
行動を変えない限り、
いずれ大きな問題に直面することになります。
私たちは皆、この過剰な搾取の壊滅的な影響を知っています。
地球温暖化、
海面上昇、
氷河や極地の氷の融解、
ますます極端になる気候パターンなどです。

この問題の巨大さは本当に私を苛立たせます。
さらに私を苛立たせるのは、
この問題には解決策があるのに、
私たちはこれまでと同じことを続けているということです。

今日は、新しい太陽光技術が建物の持続可能な未来にどのように貢献できるかをお話ししたいと思います。
建物は私たちの総エネルギー需要の約40%を消費していますので、この消費に取り組むことは気候排出量を大幅に削減することに繋がります。
持続可能な原則に基づいて設計された建物は、必要なすべての電力を自ら生産することができます。
これを達成するためには、まず消費量を可能な限り減らす必要があります。
例えば、断熱性能の高い壁や窓を使用することです。
これらの技術は商業的に利用可能です。

次に、温水や暖房のためのエネルギーが必要です。
これを再生可能な方法で太陽から得るために、ソーラーサーマル設備や、
地熱や空気から得るためにヒートポンプを使用します。
これらすべての技術は既に利用可能です。
その次に必要なのは電力です。
原則として、再生可能な電力を得るための方法はいくつかありますが、
屋根に風車がある建物や庭に水力発電所がある建物をどれだけ知っていますか?
おそらくあまり多くないでしょう。なぜなら、通常、それは現実的ではないからです。

しかし、太陽は私たちの屋根や外壁に豊富なエネルギーを提供してくれます。
このエネルギーを建物の表面で収穫する可能性は非常に大きいのです。
ヨーロッパを例に取ってみましょう。
太陽に良い向きを持ち、過度に日陰になっていないすべてのエリアを活用すれば、
太陽光発電で生成される電力は私たちの総エネルギー需要の約30%に相当します。

しかし、今日の太陽光発電にはいくつかの問題があります。
コストパフォーマンスは良いのですが、
デザインの柔軟性に欠けているため、美観の面で課題があります。
人々は建物に太陽電池を設置することを考えるとき、このようなイメージを持つことが多いです。
これはソーラーファームには適していますが、
建物や通り、建築のことを考えると、美観は重要です。
これが、今日私たちが建物に多くの太陽電池を見ない理由なのです。

私たちのチームは、有機光起電力(OPV)と呼ばれる全く新しい太陽電池技術に取り組んでいます。
「有機」という言葉は、光の吸収と電荷の輸送に使用される材料が主に炭素元素に基づいていることを意味し、金属ではありません。
私たちは、ポリマーの混合物を利用しています。
このポリマーは、真珠の鎖のように異なる繰り返し単位で構成されています。
そして、フットボールの形をしたフラーレンと呼ばれる小さな分子も使用しています。
これらの2つの化合物を混ぜて溶かすことでインクになります。
そしてインクのように、
これらはスロットダイコーティングのような簡単な印刷技術を用いて、
フレキシブルな基材に連続的なロールツーロールプロセスで印刷することができます。

その結果得られる薄い層がアクティブ層であり、
太陽のエネルギーを吸収します。
このアクティブ層は非常に効果的です。
太陽のエネルギーを吸収するには、厚さ0.2ミクロンの層で十分です。
これは人間の髪の毛の100分の1の厚さです。
別の例を挙げると、
基本ポリマー1キログラムを取り、それを使ってアクティブインクを製造します。
この量のインクで、フットボールフィールド全体のサイズの太陽電池を印刷することができます。
したがって、OPVは非常に材料効率が良く、
持続可能性について語るときには重要なことだと思います。

印刷プロセスの後、このようなソーラーモジュールが得られます。
見た目はプラスチックのフィルムのようで、
実際に多くの特徴を持っています。
軽量で、
曲げることができ、
半透明です。
しかし、屋外の太陽光や
この室内の光を収穫することができます。
この小さなLEDが点灯しているのをご覧いただけます。
プラスチックの形で使用でき、
その軽量さと曲げられる特性を活かすことができます。
これは特に暖かい地域の建物を考えるときに重要です。
ここでは、屋根は追加の重い荷重を支えるようには設計されていません。
例えば、冬の雪を考慮して設計されていないため、
重いシリコン太陽電池は使用できませんが、
これらの軽量なソーラーフィルムは非常に適しています。

曲げられる特性は、膜構造の建築と組み合わせたい場合に重要です。
シドニーオペラハウスの帆が発電所になると想像してみてください。
あるいは、ソーラーフィルムを
ガラスのような従来の建築材料と組み合わせることもできます。
多くのガラスファサード要素には、そもそも安全ガラスを作るためのフィルムが含まれています。
製造プロセスで2枚目のフィルムを追加するのはそれほど大変なことではありませんが、
その結果、ファサード要素は太陽電池を含み、
電力を生産できるようになります。

見た目が良いだけでなく、
これらの統合された太陽電池にはさらに2つの重要な利点があります。
以前に示した屋根に取り付けられた太陽電池を覚えていますか?
この場合、最初に屋根を設置し、
次に太陽電池を取り付けます。
これにより、取り付けコストが増加します。
統合された太陽電池の場合、
建設現場では1つの要素だけが設置され、
それが建物の外装であり、
同時に太陽電池でもあります。
取り付けコストを節約するだけでなく、
2つの機能が1つの要素に統合されているため、
資源も節約できます。

先ほど、光学的なことについて話しました。
私はこのソーラーパネルが本当に気に入っていますが、
あなたは異なる趣味やデザインニーズを持っているかもしれません。
問題ありません。

印刷プロセスを利用することで、太陽電池はその形状やデザインを非常に簡単に変えることができます。
これにより、建築家、プランナー、建物の所有者にとって、この電力生成技術を自由に統合する柔軟性が提供されます。
これは実験室でだけ起こっていることではないことを強調したいです。
大量導入にはまだ数年かかりますが、商業化の一歩手前にいます。
つまり、生産ラインを持つ企業がいくつかあり、彼らは生産能力を拡大していますし、私たちもインクの生産を拡大しています。

この小さなフットプリントは非常に快適です。

これは、適切なサイズ、適切なスケールです。
エネルギー消費に関して、私たちは適切なスケールに戻る必要があります。
建物をカーボンニュートラルにすることはここで重要な部分です。
ヨーロッパでは、2050年までに建物の炭素排出量を削減することを目標としています。
有機光起電力がこの目標の大きな部分を占めることを望んでいます。
いくつかの例を紹介します。
これは完全に印刷された有機太陽電池の最初の商業インストールです。
「商業的」とは、太陽電池が産業用設備で印刷されたことを意味します。
いわゆる「ソーラーツリー」は、2015年にミラノで開催された万国博覧会のドイツパビリオンの一部でした。
これらは昼間には日陰を提供し、夕方には照明のための電力を供給しました。
なぜ太陽電池にこの六角形の形が選ばれたのか不思議に思うかもしれません。

簡単に答えましょう。
建築家たちは特定の床の日よけパターンを望んでおり、それを依頼しました。
そして、それが要求通りに印刷されました。
実際の製品にはほど遠いこの自由な形態のインストールは、
予想以上に訪れた建築家たちの想像力を引きつけました。

この他の応用例は、私たちが目指しているプロジェクトや応用により近いものです。
ブラジルのサンパウロにあるオフィスビルでは、
半透明のOPVパネルがガラスファサードに統合され、さまざまなニーズに応えています。
まず、これらのパネルは後ろの会議室の日よけを提供します。
次に、会社のロゴが革新的な方法で表示されます。
そしてもちろん、電力が生産され、
建物のエネルギーフットプリントが削減されます。

これは、建物がもはやエネルギー消費者ではなく、エネルギー供給者となる未来を示唆しています。
私は、太陽電池が建物の外装にシームレスに統合され、
資源効率が高く、見た目にも美しいものとなる未来を見たいと思います。
屋根に関しては、シリコン太陽電池が引き続き良い解決策となることが多いでしょう。
しかし、すべてのファサードや他のエリア、
例えば半透明のエリア、曲面、日よけの可能性を活用するために、
有機光起電力が大きな貢献を果たすことができ、
建築家やプランナーが望むどんな形にも作ることができると信じています。

ご清聴ありがとうございました。

コメント

タイトルとURLをコピーしました