貧困国での精密公衆衛生の導入がもたらす未来

社会

Sue Desmond-Hellmann is using precision public health — an approach that incorporates big data, consumer monitoring, gene sequencing and other innovative tools — to solve the world’s most difficult medical problems. It’s already helped cut HIV transmission from mothers to babies by nearly half in sub-Saharan Africa, and now it’s being used to address alarming infant mortality rates all over the world. The goal: to save lives by bringing the right interventions to the right populations at the right time.

スー・デズモンド=ヘルマンは、ビッグデータ、消費者モニタリング、遺伝子配列解析などの革新的なツールを取り入れた精密公衆衛生というアプローチを用いて、世界で最も困難な医療問題を解決しようとしています。

これにより、すでにアフリカのサハラ以南で母子間のHIV感染率をほぼ半減させるのに役立ち、今後は世界中の乳幼児死亡率の懸念に対処するために使用されます。目標は、適切な介入を適切な人口に適切なタイミングでもたらすことで、命を救うことです。

タイトル A smarter, more precise way to think about public health
公衆衛生についてより賢くより正確に考える方法
スピーカー スー・デズモンド=ヘルマン
アップロード 2016/06/23
スポンサーリンク

「公衆衛生についてより賢く、より正確に考える方法(A smarter, more precise way to think about public health)」の文字起こし

OK, first, some introductions. My mom, Jennie, took this picture. That’s my dad, Frank, in the middle. And on his left, my sisters: Mary Catherine, Judith Ann, Theresa Marie. John Patrick’s sitting on his lap and Kevin Michael’s on his right. And in the pale-blue windbreaker, Susan Diane. Me. I loved growing up in a big family. And one of my favorite things was picking names. But by the time child number seven came along, we had nearly run out of middle names. It was a long deliberation before we finally settled on Jennifer Bridget. Every parent in this audience knows the joy and excitement of picking a new baby’s name. And I was excited and thrilled to help my mom in that special ceremonial moment. But it’s not like that everywhere. I travel a lot and I see a lot. But it took me by surprise to learn in an area of Ethiopia, parents delay picking the names for their new babies by a month or more. Why delay? Why not take advantage of this special ceremonial time? Well, they delay because they’re afraid. They’re afraid their baby will die. And this loss might be a little more bearable without a name. A face without a name might help them feel just a little less attached. So here we are in one part of the world — a time of joy, excitement, dreaming of the future of that child — while in another world, parents are filled with dread, not daring to dream of a future for their child beyond a few precious weeks. How can that be? How can it be that 2.6 million babies die around the world before they’re even one month old? 2.6 million. That’s the population of Vancouver. And the shocking thing is: Why? In too many cases, we simply don’t know.

Now, I remember recently seeing an updated pie chart. And the pie chart was labeled, “Causes of death in children under five worldwide.” And there was a pretty big section of that pie chart, about 40 percent — 40 percent was labeled “neonatal.” Now, “neonatal” is not a cause of death. Neonatal is simply an adjective, an adjective that means that the child is less than one month old. For me, “neonatal” said: “We have no idea.” Now, I’m a scientist. I’m a doctor. I want to fix things. But you can’t fix what you can’t define. So our first step in restoring the dreams of those parents is to answer the question: Why are babies dying?

So today, I want to talk about a new approach, an approach that I feel will not only help us know why babies are dying, but is beginning to completely transform the whole field of global health. It’s called “Precision Public Health.”

For me, precision medicine comes from a very special place. I trained as a cancer doctor, an oncologist. I got into it because I wanted to help people feel better. But too often my treatments made them feel worse. I still remember young women being driven to my clinic by their moms — adults, who had to be helped into my exam room by their mothers.

They were so weak from the treatment I had given them. But at the time, in those front lines in the war on cancer, we had few tools. And the tools we did have couldn’t differentiate between the cancer cells that we wanted to hit hard and those healthy cells that we wanted to preserve. And so the side effects that you’re all very familiar with — hair loss, being sick to your stomach, having a suppressed immune system, so infection was a constant threat — were always surrounding us. And then I moved to the biotechnology industry. And I got to work on a new approach for breast cancer patients that could do a better job of telling the healthy cells from the unhealthy or cancer cells. It’s a drug called Herceptin. And what Herceptin allowed us to do is to precisely target HER2-positive breast cancer, at the time, the scariest form of breast cancer. And that precision let us hit hard the cancer cells, while sparing and being more gentle on the normal cells. A huge breakthrough. It felt like a miracle, so much so that today, we’re harnessing all those tools — big data, consumer monitoring, gene sequencing and more — to tackle a broad variety of diseases. That’s allowing us to target individuals with the right remedies at the right time. Precision medicine revolutionized cancer therapy. Everything changed. And I want everything to change again.

So I’ve been asking myself: Why should we limit this smarter, more precise, better way to tackle diseases to the rich world? Now, don’t misunderstand me — I’m not talking about bringing expensive medicines like Herceptin to the developing world, although I’d actually kind of like that. What I am talking about is moving from this precise targeting for individuals to tackle public health problems in populations. Now, OK, I know probably you’re thinking, “She’s crazy. You can’t do that. That’s too ambitious.” But here’s the thing: we’re already doing this in a limited way, and it’s already starting to make a big difference. So here’s what’s happening.

Now, I told you I trained as a cancer doctor. But like many, many doctors who trained in San Francisco in the ’80s, I also trained as an AIDS doctor. It was a terrible time. AIDS was a death sentence. All my patients died. Now, things are better, but HIV/AIDS remains a terrible global challenge. Worldwide, about 17 million women are living with HIV. We know that when these women become pregnant, they can transfer the virus to their baby. We also know in the absence of therapy, half those babies will not survive until the age of two. But we know that antiretroviral therapy can virtually guarantee that she will not transmit the virus to the baby. So what do we do? Well, a one-size-fits-all approach, kind of like that blast of chemo, would mean we test and treat every pregnant woman in the world. That would do the job. But it’s just not practical. So instead, we target those areas where HIV rates are the highest. We know in certain countries in sub-Saharan Africa we can test and treat pregnant women where rates are highest. This precision approach to a public health problem has cut by nearly half HIV transmission from mothers to baby in the last five years.

Screening pregnant women in certain areas in the developing world is a powerful example of how precision public health can change things on a big scale. So … How do we do that? We can do that because we know. We know who to target, what to target, where to target and how to target. And that, for me, are the important elements of precision public health: who, what, where and how.

But let’s go back to the 2.6 million babies who die before they’re one month old. Here’s the problem: we just don’t know. It may seem unbelievable, but the way we figure out the causes of infant mortality in those countries with the highest infant mortality is a conversation with mom. A health worker asks a mom who has just lost her child, “Was the baby vomiting? Did they have a fever?” And that conversation may take place as long as three months after the baby has died. Now, put yourself in the shoes of that mom. It’s a heartbreaking, excruciating conversation. And even worse — it’s not that helpful, because we might know there was a fever or vomiting, but we don’t know why. So in the absence of knowing that knowledge, we cannot prevent that mom, that family, or other families in that community from suffering the same tragedy.

But what if we applied a precision public health approach? Let’s say, for example, we find out in certain areas of Africa that babies are dying because of a bacterial infection transferred from the mother to the baby, known as Group B streptococcus. In the absence of treatment, mom has a seven times higher chance that her next baby will die. Once we define the problem, we can prevent that death with something as cheap and safe as penicillin. We can do that because then we’ll know. And that’s the point: once we know, we can bring the right interventions to the right population in the right places to save lives.

With this approach, and with these interventions and others like them, I have no doubt that a precision public health approach can help our world achieve our 15-year goal. And that would translate into a million babies’ lives saved every single year. One million babies every single year. And why would we stop there? A much more powerful approach to public health — imagine what might be possible. Why couldn’t we more effectively tackle malnutrition? Why wouldn’t we prevent cervical cancer in women? And why not eradicate malaria?

Yes, clap for that!

So, you know, I live in two different worlds, one world populated by scientists, and another world populated by public health professionals. The promise of precision public health is to bring these two worlds together. But you know, we all live in two worlds: the rich world and the poor world. And what I’m most excited about about precision public health is bridging these two worlds. Every day in the rich world, we’re bringing incredible talent and tools — everything at our disposal — to precisely target diseases in ways I never imagined would be possible. Surely, we can tap into that kind of talent and tools to stop babies dying in the poor world. If we did, then every parent would have the confidence to name their child the moment that child is born, daring to dream that that child’s life will be measured in decades, not days. Thank you.

「公衆衛生についてより賢く、より正確に考える方法(A smarter, more precise way to think about public health)」の和訳

さて、まずは自己紹介から始めます。この写真を撮ったのは私の母、ジェニーです。真ん中にいるのが私の父、フランク。その左側にいるのが私の姉妹たち、メアリー・キャサリン、ジュディス・アン、テレサ・マリー。父の膝の上にいるのがジョン・パトリック、右側にいるのがケビン・マイケル。そして、淡い青のウィンドブレーカーを着ているのが私、スーザン・ダイアンです。私は大きな家族で育つのが大好きでした。そして、一番好きなことの一つは名前を選ぶことでした。しかし、7番目の子供が生まれる頃には、ミドルネームがほとんど尽きていました。最終的にジェニファー・ブリジットに決めるまで、長い議論が続きました。ここにいるすべての親が、新しい赤ちゃんの名前を選ぶ喜びと興奮を知っているでしょう。そして、私は母がその特別な儀式の瞬間を手伝うことに興奮していました。しかし、どこでもそういうわけではありません。

私はたくさん旅をします。そして多くのことを見てきましたが、エチオピアのある地域で親が新しい赤ちゃんの名前を一ヶ月以上も遅らせて付けると知って驚きました。なぜ遅らせるのでしょうか?なぜこの特別な儀式の時間を楽しむことができないのでしょうか?それは彼らが恐れているからです。彼らは赤ちゃんが死ぬのを恐れています。この損失が名前のないままの方が少しでも耐えやすいかもしれないからです。名前のない顔は、少しでも愛着を持たずに済むかもしれないのです。

ここでは、子供の未来を夢見る喜びと興奮の時間がありますが、別の世界では、親たちは恐怖で満たされ、その子供の未来を数週間以上夢見ることを敢えてしないのです。どうしてそんなことがあるのでしょうか?どうして世界中で260万人の赤ちゃんが生後1ヶ月も経たずに死んでしまうのでしょうか?260万人。それはバンクーバーの人口に相当します。そして驚くべきことに、なぜでしょうか?多くの場合、私たちは単に知らないのです。

最近、私は更新された円グラフを見ました。そしてその円グラフには、「5歳未満の子供の死因」と書かれていました。その円グラフの約40%、40%が「新生児期」とラベル付けされていました。さて、「新生児期」は死因ではありません。「新生児期」は単に形容詞であり、生後1ヶ月未満の子供を意味します。私にとって、「新生児期」は「私たちは何もわからない」ということを意味していました。

私は科学者です。私は医者です。私は物事を直したいのです。しかし、定義できないものは直せません。だから、親たちの夢を取り戻すための最初のステップは、赤ちゃんがなぜ死んでいるのかという質問に答えることです。

さて、今日は新しいアプローチについて話したいと思います。このアプローチは、赤ちゃんがなぜ死んでいるのかを知るだけでなく、グローバルヘルス全体を完全に変革し始めていると感じています。それは「精密公衆衛生」と呼ばれています。

私にとって、精密医学は特別な場所から来ています。私は癌専門医、オンコロジストとして訓練を受けました。私は人々を楽にするためにそれに取り組んでいました。しかし、あまりにも多くの治療が彼らをより苦しめました。その治療が彼らをどれほど弱らせるかを知っていました。しかし、その当時、癌との戦いの最前線では、私たちには限られたツールしかありませんでした。そして、そのツールでさえ、打撃を与えたい癌細胞と保存したい健康な細胞を区別することができませんでした。したがって、皆さんが非常によく知っている副作用、髪の毛の脱落、胃の不調、免疫系の抑制、感染が常に脅威となっている状況が私たちの周りに常に存在していました。

その後、私はバイオテクノロジー業界に移りました。そして、健康な細胞と癌細胞をよりよく区別するための新しいアプローチに取り組みました。それが「ハーセプチン」という薬です。ハーセプチンは、当時最も恐れられていた乳がんであるHER2陽性乳がんを正確にターゲットにすることを可能にしました。そしてその精度により、癌細胞を強力に打撃しながら、正常な細胞には優しくすることができました。これは大きな突破口でした。まるで奇跡のようでした。今日では、そのすべてのツール、ビッグデータ、消費者モニタリング、遺伝子配列解析などを活用して、さまざまな病気に取り組んでいます。それにより、個人に対して適切な時期に適切な治療を提供することができます。精密医学は癌治療を革命的に変えました。すべてが変わりました。そして、私は再びすべてが変わることを望んでいます。

そこで私は自問しました:なぜこの賢明で、より正確で、より良い方法で病気に取り組むことを、裕福な世界に限定しなければならないのでしょうか?誤解しないでください。高価な薬、例えばハーセプチンを発展途上国に持ち込むことを話しているわけではありませんが、実際にはそうしたいと思っています。私が話しているのは、個々人に対する精密なターゲティングから、集団に対する公衆衛生問題への取り組みに移行することです。

「彼女は狂っている。そんなことはできない。あまりにも野心的だ」と思っているかもしれませんが、実際には、すでに限られた方法でそれが行われており、すでに大きな違いを生み出し始めています。

例えば、HIV/AIDSに対する取り組みがあります。HIV/AIDSは依然として世界的な課題です。世界中で約1700万人の女性がHIVを持っています。これらの女性が妊娠すると、そのウイルスを赤ちゃんに移すことがあります。しかし、抗レトロウイルス療法があれば、彼女がウイルスを赤ちゃんに移す可能性はほぼなくなります。では、どうするのでしょうか?一律のアプローチは、全ての妊婦を検査して治療することですが、これは現実的ではありません。代わりに、HIV率が最も高い地域をターゲットにします。この精密アプローチにより、HIVが母親から赤ちゃんに伝わる確率は過去5年間でほぼ半減しました。

精密公衆衛生のアプローチが、大規模なスケールで変化をもたらすことができるという例です。どうやってそれを行うのか?それは「誰に、何を、どこで、どのように」という精密公衆衛生の重要な要素を知っているからです。

2.6百万人の赤ちゃんが1ヶ月も経たずに死ぬという問題に戻りましょう。問題は、私たちがただ知らないということです。乳児死亡率の原因を見つける方法は、母親との会話です。健康管理者が赤ちゃんを失ったばかりの母親に「赤ちゃんは嘔吐していましたか?熱がありましたか?」と尋ねます。しかし、その会話は赤ちゃんが亡くなった後3ヶ月も経ってから行われることがあります。母親の立場になって考えてみてください。それは心が引き裂かれるような会話です。そしてさらに悪いことに、その会話はあまり役に立たないことが多いのです。なぜなら、熱があったかどうかはわかっても、なぜかは

わからないからです。

しかし、精密公衆衛生のアプローチを適用したらどうでしょうか?例えば、アフリカの特定の地域で、赤ちゃんが母親から移される細菌感染(グループBストレプトコッカス)で死んでいることがわかった場合、その問題を定義した後に、安価で安全なペニシリンでその死を防ぐことができます。問題を定義したら、適切な介入を適切な集団に適切な場所で提供することができます。

このアプローチとそのような介入により、15年間の目標を達成し、毎年100万人の赤ちゃんの命を救うことができると確信しています。毎年100万人の赤ちゃん。そして、なぜそこで止める必要があるのでしょうか?公衆衛生に対する非常に強力なアプローチがあるのです。なぜ栄養不良にもっと効果的に取り組めないのでしょうか?なぜ子宮頸がんを予防しないのでしょうか?そして、なぜマラリアを根絶しないのでしょうか?

私は二つの異なる世界に住んでいます。一つは科学者の世界、もう一つは公衆衛生専門家の世界です。精密公衆衛生の約束は、この二つの世界を結びつけることです。しかし、私たちは皆、二つの世界に住んでいます。豊かな世界と貧しい世界です。そして、精密公衆衛生に最も興奮しているのは、この二つの世界を橋渡しすることです。毎日、豊かな世界では、病気に対して信じられないほどの才能とツールが活用されています。そのような才能とツールを活用して、貧しい世界で赤ちゃんが死ぬのを止めることができると確信しています。そうすれば、すべての親が子供が生まれた瞬間にその子供に名前を付け、その子供の人生が何十年にもわたって測られることを夢見ることができるのです。

ありがとうございました。

タイトルとURLをコピーしました