月経の理解を深めるメンスツピーディアの普及とその影響

健康

Aditi is a social entrepreneur and Co-founder of Menstrupedia, working towards spreading awareness about menstruation. As a Ford Foundation research Scholar she has conducted extensive research in understanding the scenario of menstrual unawareness in India and its impact on a girl’s life. Aditi along with her husband Tuhin Paul has designed effective educational tools for girls and schools using storytelling and sequential art for educating young girls about menstruation in a society where the subject is a major taboo. Menstrupedia’s website receives 200,000 visitors per month. The comic book designed by them is available in Hindi and English now and 15 schools across India and using the books to educate school girls about periods. The books have been shipping to Uruguy, US, Uk, Sweden, Philippines, Nepal, Pakistan and Nigeria.They are working on Nepali and Spanish translation of the book which would be ready to be printed and distributed locally in Nepal and South America.

Aditiは社会起業家であり、Menstrupediaの共同創設者であり、月経に関する意識を広める活動に取り組んでいます。

フォード財団の研究奨学生として、彼女はインドにおける月経無知の状況とそれが女の子の生活に与える影響を理解するための広範な調査を行ってきました。 Aditiは夫のTuhin Paulと共に、物語や連続画を使用して若い女の子に月経について教育するための効果的な教育ツールを設計しました。月経は大きなタブーとされる社会で、この教材が作られました。 Menstrupediaのウェブサイトは月間20万人の訪問者を受けています。彼らが設計したコミックブックは今ではヒンディー語と英語で入手可能で、インド全土の15校がこの本を使用して学校の女の子たちに月経について教育しています。この本はウルグアイ、米国、英国、スウェーデン、フィリピン、ネパール、パキスタン、ナイジェリアに出荷されています。彼らはネパールと南アメリカで現地で印刷および配布される準備ができている、この本のネパール語とスペイン語への翻訳に取り組んでいます。

タイトル A taboo-free way to talk about periods
タブーなしで生理について話す方法
スピーカー アディティ・グプタ
アップロード 2015/10/30

「タブーなしで生理について話す方法(A taboo-free way to talk about periods)」の文字起こし

Periods. Blood. Menstruation. Gross. Secret. Hidden. Why? A natural biological process that every girl and woman goes through every month for about half of her life. A phenomenon that is so significant that the survival and propagation of our species depends on it. Yet we consider it a taboo. We feel awkward and shameful talking about it. When I got my first periods, I was told to keep it a secret from others — even from my father and brother. Later when this chapter appeared in our textbooks, our biology teacher skipped the subject.

You know what I learned from it? I learned that it is really shameful to talk about it. I learned to be ashamed of my body. I learned to stay unaware of periods in order to stay decent. Research in various parts of India shows that three out of every 10 girls are not aware of menstruation at the time of their first periods. And in some parts of Rajasthan this number is as high as nine out of 10 girls being unaware of it. You’d be surprised to know that most of the girls that I have spoken to, who did not know about periods at the time of their first menstruation thought that they have got blood cancer and they’re going to die soon. Menstrual hygiene is a very important risk factor for reproductive tract infections. But in India, only 12 percent of girls and women have access to hygienic ways of managing their periods. If you do the math, 88 percent of girls and women use unhygienic ways to manage their periods.

I was one of them. I grew up in a small town called Garhwa, in Jharkhand, where even buying a sanitary napkin is considered shameful. So when I started getting my periods, I began with using rags. After every use I would wash and reuse them. But to store them, I would hide and keep it in a dark, damp place so that nobody finds out that I’m menstruating. Due to repeated washing the rags would become coarse, and I would often get rashes and infections using them. I wore these already for five years until I moved out of that town. Another issue that periods brought in my life was those of the social restrictions that are imposed upon our girls and women when they’re on their periods. I think you all must be aware of it, but I’ll still list it for the few who don’t.

I was not allowed to touch or eat pickles. I was not allowed to sit on the sofa or some other family member’s bed. I had to wash my bed sheet after every period, even if it was not stained. I was considered impure and forbidden from worshipping or touching any object of religious importance. You’ll find signposts outside temples denying the entry of menstruating girls and women. Ironically, most of the time it is the older woman who imposes such restrictions on younger girls in a family. After all, they have grown up accepting such restrictions as norms.

And in the absence of any intervention, it is the myth and misconception that propagate from generation to generation. During my years of work in this field, I have even come across stories where girls have to eat and wash their dishes separately. They’re not allowed to take baths during periods, and in some households they are even secluded from other family members. About 85 percent of girls and women in India would follow one or more restrictive customs on their periods every month. Can you imagine what this does to the self-esteem and self-confidence of a young girl? The psychological trauma that this inflicts, affecting her personality, her academic performance and every single aspect of growing up during her early formative years?

I religiously followed all these restrictive customs for 13 years, until a discussion with my partner, Tuhin, changed my perception about menstruation forever. In 2009, Tuhin and I were pursuing our postgraduation in design. We fell in love with each other and I was at ease discussing periods with him. Tuhin knew little about periods. He was astonished to know that girls get painful cramps and we bleed every month. Yeah. He was completely shocked to know about the restrictions that are imposed upon menstruating girls and women by their own families and their society. In order to help me with my cramps, he would go on the Internet and learn more about menstruation. When he shared his findings with me, I realized how little I knew about menstruation myself. And many of my beliefs actually turned out to be myths. That’s when we wondered: if we, being so well educated, were so ill-informed about menstruation, there would be millions of girls out there who would be ill-informed, too.

To study — to understand the problem better, I undertook a year-long research to study the lack of awareness about menstruation and the root cause behind it. While it is generally believed that menstrual unawareness and misconception is a rural phenomenon, during my research, I found that it is as much an urban phenomenon as well. And it exists with the educated urban class, also. While talking to many parents and teachers, I found that many of them actually wanted to educate girls about periods before they have started getting their menstrual cycle. And — but they lacked the proper means themselves. And since it is a taboo, they feel inhibition and shameful in talking about it. Girls nowadays get their periods in classes six and seven, but our educational curriculum teaches girls about periods only in standard eight and nine. And since it is a taboo, teachers still skip the subject altogether. So school does not teach girls about periods, parents don’t talk about it. Where do the girls go?

Two decades ago and now — nothing has changed. I shared these finding with Tuhin and we wondered: What if we could create something that would help girls understand about menstruation on their own — something that would help parents and teachers talk about periods comfortably to young girls?

During my research, I was collecting a lot of stories. These were stories of experiences of girls during their periods. These stories would make girls curious and interested in talking about menstruation in their close circle. That’s what we wanted. We wanted something that would make the girls curious and drive them to learn about it. We wanted to use these stories to teach girls about periods. So we decided to create a comic book, where the cartoon characters would enact these stories and educate girls about menstruation in a fun and engaging way. To represent girls in their different phases of puberty, we have three characters. Pinki, who has not gotten her period yet, Jiya who gets her period during the narrative of the book and Mira who has already been getting her period. There is a fourth character, Priya Didi. Through her, girls come to know about the various aspects of growing up and menstrual hygiene management. While making the book, we took great care that none of the illustrations were objectionable in any way and that it is culturally sensitive. During our prototype testing, we found that the girls loved the book. They were keen on reading it and knowing more and more about periods on their own. Parents and teachers were comfortable in talking about periods to young girls using the book, and sometimes even boys were interested in reading it.

The comic book helped in creating an environment where menstruation ceased to be a taboo. Many of the volunteers took this prototype themselves to educate girls and take menstrual awareness workshops in five different states in India. And one of the volunteers took this prototype to educate young monks and took it to this monastery in Ladakh. We made the final version of the book, called “Menstrupedia Comic” and launched in September last year. And so far, more than 4,000 girls have been educated by using the book in India and — Thank you.

And 10 different countries. We are constantly translating the book into different languages and collaborating with local organizations to make this book available in different countries. 15 schools in different parts of India have made this book a part of their school curriculum to teach girls about menstruation.

I am amazed to see how volunteers, individuals, parents, teachers, school principals, have come together and taken this menstrual awareness drive to their own communities, have made sure that the girls learn about periods at the right age and helped in breaking this taboo. I dream of a future where menstruation is not a curse, not a disease, but a welcoming change in a girl’s life. And I would —

And I would like to end this with a small request to all the parents here. Dear parents, if you would be ashamed of periods, your daughters would be, too. So please be period positive.

Thank you.

「タブーなしで生理について話す方法(A taboo-free way to talk about periods)」の和訳

生理。血。月経。汚い。秘密。隠される。なぜ?女性が毎月半生の間に経験する自然な生物学的プロセス。それは私たちの種の存続と繁殖にとって非常に重要な現象です。それにもかかわらず、私たちはこれをタブー視しています。話すのに気まずくて恥ずかしいと感じます。初めて生理が来たとき、他の人、特に父や兄には秘密にするように言われました。その後、この章が教科書に載っているときも、生物の先生はこのテーマを飛ばしました。

私はそこから何を学んだでしょうか?それについて話すのは本当に恥ずかしいことだと学びました。自分の体を恥じることを学びました。生理について無知であることで礼儀正しくいられると学びました。インドのさまざまな地域での調査によると、最初の生理のときに生理について知らなかった女の子は10人中3人です。ラージャスターン州の一部では、この数字は10人中9人にも達しています。私が話した多くの女の子は、初めての生理のときにそれについて知らなかったので、血液癌になりすぐに死ぬと考えていたことに驚かれるでしょう。生理中の衛生管理は、女性の生殖器感染症の非常に重要なリスク要因です。しかし、インドでは、女子と女性のわずか12パーセントが衛生的な方法で生理を管理しています。計算すると、88パーセントの女子と女性が不衛生な方法で生理を管理していることになります。

私はその一人でした。私はジャールカンド州のガルワという小さな町で育ちました。そこでは生理用ナプキンを買うことさえ恥ずかしいとされています。生理が始まったとき、私は布切れを使い始めました。使うたびに洗って再利用しましたが、保管するためには誰にも見つからないように暗くて湿った場所に隠していました。何度も洗うことで布は粗くなり、使用するたびにかぶれや感染症を引き起こしました。このような布を5年間も使い続け、その町を出るまで使っていました。生理が私の人生にもたらしたもう一つの問題は、生理中の女性に課される社会的制約です。皆さんもご存知かと思いますが、知らない方のために少し説明します。

ピクルスに触れたり食べたりすることを禁じられました。ソファや他の家族のベッドに座ることも許されませんでした。たとえ汚れていなくても、生理の度にシーツを洗わなければなりませんでした。不浄と見なされ、礼拝や宗教的な物品に触れることを禁じられました。生理中の女の子や女性の入場を禁止する標識が寺院の外に立っています。皮肉なことに、ほとんどの場合、こうした制限を若い女の子に課すのは年配の女性です。彼女たちはこのような制限を当たり前のこととして受け入れて育ってきたからです。

そして、何の介入もないまま、迷信や誤解が世代から世代へと受け継がれていきます。この分野で働いている間に、女の子が別々に食事をし、皿を洗わなければならないという話も聞きました。生理中にはお風呂に入ることを禁じられ、一部の家庭では他の家族から隔離されることもあります。インドの女の子や女性の約85%が毎月、生理中に一つ以上の制限を守っています。若い女の子の自尊心や自信にどれほどの影響を与えるか想像できますか?心理的なトラウマが彼女の人格、学業成績、そして成長過程のあらゆる側面に影響を及ぼします。

私はこれらの制限を13年間、宗教的な信念として守り続けていましたが、パートナーのトゥヒンとの話し合いがきっかけで、生理に対する見方が永遠に変わりました。2009年、トゥヒンと私はデザインの大学院に通っていました。私たちは恋に落ち、生理についても彼と話すことに抵抗を感じませんでした。トゥヒンは生理についてほとんど知らなかったのですが、女の子が毎月痛みを伴う痙攣を経験し、出血することに驚いていました。彼は家族や社会が生理中の女の子や女性に課す制限に衝撃を受けました。私の痙攣を和らげるために、彼はインターネットで生理について調べ、私に共有してくれました。そのとき、自分自身が生理についてどれほど知らなかったかを実感しました。そして、多くの信念が実際には迷信であることがわかりました。このとき、私たちは考えました。私たちのように教育を受けた者が生理についてこれほど無知であれば、他にも無数の女の子が同じように無知であるに違いないと。

問題をよりよく理解するために、私は1年間の調査を行い、生理に関する無知の原因を探りました。一般的には生理に関する無知や誤解は農村の現象だと考えられていますが、私の調査では、それは都市部でも同様であり、教育を受けた都市の人々にも存在することが分かりました。多くの親や教師と話してみると、彼らの多くは実際には女の子たちが生理を始める前に教育したいと思っていることが分かりました。しかし、彼ら自身が適切な手段を持っておらず、またそれがタブーであるために話すことに躊躇し、恥ずかしさを感じているのです。最近の女の子たちは6年生や7年生で生理を迎えますが、教育課程では生理について教えるのは8年生や9年生になってからです。そして、タブーであるために教師たちはその話題を避けてしまうことが多いのです。学校は女の子たちに生理について教えず、親も話さない。では、女の子たちはどこで学ぶのでしょうか?

20年前と今では、何も変わっていません。これらの調査結果をトゥヒンと共有し、私たちは考えました。もし、女の子たちが自分自身で生理について理解できるものを作ることができたらどうだろうか?親や教師が若い女の子たちに生理について快適に話すことができるようなものを作れたらどうだろうか?

調査を進める中で、私は多くの物語を収集しました。それは、女の子たちが生理中に経験した話でした。これらの話は女の子たちを好奇心旺盛にし、親しい仲間内で生理について話し合うきっかけを作るものでした。私たちが求めていたのはまさにそれでした。女の子たちに好奇心を持たせ、生理について学びたいと思わせるものを作りたかったのです。そこで、これらの物語を使って女の子たちに生理について教えることにしました。楽しくて興味を引く方法で生理を教えるために、コミックブックを作ることに決めました。

コミックのキャラクターたちがこれらの物語を演じ、女の子たちに生理について教育するのです。思春期の異なる段階を代表するために、私たちは3人のキャラクターを用意しました。まだ生理を経験していないピンキ、生理を物語の中で迎えるジヤ、そしてすでに生理を経験しているミラです。さらに、プリア・ディディというキャラクターも登場します。彼女を通じて、女の子たちは成長や生理の衛生管理について知ることができます。

本を作る際には、どのイラストも問題がないように細心の注意を払い、文化的に敏感な内容にしました。プロトタイプのテストを行ったところ、女の子たちは本を非常に気に入り、自分自身で生理についてもっと知りたいと強く思っていることが分かりました。親や教師もこの本を使って若い女の子たちに生理について話すことに抵抗がなくなり、時には男の子たちも本を読みたがることがありました。

このコミックブックは、生理がタブーでなくなる環境を作るのに役立ちました。多くのボランティアがこのプロトタイプを使って、自ら女の子たちに教育を行い、インドの5つの州で生理に関するワークショップを開きました。さらに、あるボランティアはこのプロトタイプを若い僧侶たちに教育するためにラダックの修道院に持っていきました。最終版の本「メンスルペディア・コミック」を作り、昨年9月に発表しました。これまでに、この本を使ってインドと10か国以上で4,000人以上の女の子が教育を受けました。

ありがとうございます。

私たちはこの本をさまざまな言語に翻訳し続け、現地の組織と協力して、この本をさまざまな国で利用できるようにしています。インド各地の15の学校がこの本を学校のカリキュラムの一部として取り入れ、女の子たちに生理について教えています。

ボランティアや個人、親、教師、校長先生たちが一緒になってこの生理に関する啓発活動を自分たちのコミュニティに持ち込み、女の子たちが適切な年齢で生理について学び、このタブーを破る手助けをしているのを見ると驚かされます。私は、生理が呪いでも病気でもなく、女の子の人生における歓迎すべき変化となる未来を夢見ています。そして最後に、ここにいるすべての親御さんにお願いがあります。

親御さんが生理を恥ずかしいと思うならば、あなたの娘さんたちも同じように感じるでしょう。ですから、生理を前向きに捉えてください。

ありがとうございました。

コメント

タイトルとURLをコピーしました