高リスク妊婦を救う柔軟な電子パッチの革新

健康

What if doctors could monitor patients at home with the same degree of accuracy they’d get during a stay at the hospital? Bioelectronics innovator Todd Coleman shares his quest to develop wearable, flexible electronic health monitoring patches that promise to revolutionize healthcare and make medicine less invasive.

もし医師が患者を病院滞在中と同じ精度で自宅でモニターできたらどうでしょうか?

生体電子工学のイノベーター、トッド・コールマンが、医療を革新し、医学を侵襲性の低いものにすることを約束する、着用可能で柔軟な電子健康モニタリングパッチの開発に挑戦する旅を共有します。

タイトル A temporary tattoo that brings hospital care to the home
病院でのケアを自宅にもたらす一時的なタトゥー
スピーカー トッド・コールマン
アップロード 2016/11/11

「病院でのケアを自宅にもたらす一時的なタトゥー(A temporary tattoo that brings hospital care to the home)」の文字起こし

Please meet Jane. She has a high-risk pregnancy. Within 24 weeks, she’s on bed rest at the hospital, being monitored for her preterm contractions. She doesn’t look the happiest. That’s in part because it requires technicians and experts to apply these clunky belts on her to monitor her uterine contractions. Another reason Jane is not so happy is because she’s worried. In particular, she’s worried about what happens after her 10-day stay on bed rest at the hospital. What happens when she’s home? If she were to give birth this early it would be devastating. As an African-American woman, she’s twice as likely to have a premature birth or to have a stillbirth. So Jane basically has one of two options: stay at the hospital on bed rest, a prisoner to the technology until she gives birth, and then spend the rest of her life paying for the bill; or head home after her 10-day stay and hope for the best. Neither of these two options seems appealing.

As I began to think about stories like this and hear about stories like this, I began to ask myself and imagine: Is there an alternative? Is there a way we could have the benefits of high-fidelity monitoring that we get with our trusted partners in the hospital while someone is at home living their daily life? With that in mind, I encouraged people in my research group to partner with some clever material scientists, and all of us came together and brainstormed. And after a long process, we came up with a vision, an idea, of a wearable system that perhaps you could wear like a piece of jewelry or you could apply to yourself like a Band-Aid. And after many trials and tribulations and years of endeavors, we were able to come up with this flexible electronic patch that was manufactured using the same processes that they use to build computer chips, except the electronics are transferred from a semiconductor wafer onto a flexible material that can interface with the human body. These systems are about the thickness of a human hair. They can measure the types of information that we want, things such as: bodily movement, bodily temperature, electrical rhythms of the body and so forth. We can also engineer these systems, so they can integrate energy sources, and can have wireless transmission capabilities. So as we began to build these types of systems, we began to test them on ourselves in our research group. But in addition, we began to reach out to some of our clinical partners in San Diego, and test these on different patients in different clinical conditions, including moms-to-be like Jane.

Here is a picture of a pregnant woman in labor at our university hospital being monitored for her uterine contractions with the conventional belt. In addition, our flexible electronic patches are there. This picture demonstrates waveforms pertaining to the fetal heart rate, where the red corresponds to what was acquired with the conventional belts, and the blue corresponds to our estimates using our flexible electronic systems and our algorithms.

At this moment, we gave ourselves a big mental high five. Some of the things we had imagined were beginning to come to fruition, and we were actually seeing this in a clinical context. But there was still a problem. The problem was, the way we manufactured these systems was very inefficient, had low yield, and was very error-prone. In addition, as we talked to some of the nurses in the hospital, they encouraged us to make sure that our electronics worked with typical medical adhesives that are used in a hospital. We had an epiphany and said, “Wait a minute. Rather than just making them work with adhesives, let’s integrate them into adhesives, and that could solve our manufacturing problem.” This picture that you see here is our ability to embed these sensors inside of a piece of Scotch tape by simply peeling it off of a wafer. Ongoing work in our research group allows us to, in addition, embed integrated circuits into the flexible adhesives to do things like amplifying signals and digitizing them, processing them and encoding for wireless transmission. All of this integrated into the same medical adhesives that are used in the hospital.

So when we reached this point, we had some other challenges, from both an engineering as well as a usability perspective, to make sure that we could make it used practically. In many digital health discussions, people believe in and embrace the idea that we can simply digitize the data, wirelessly transmit it, send it to the cloud, and in the cloud, we can extract meaningful information for interpretation. And indeed, you can do all of that, if you’re not worried about some of the energy challenges. Think about Jane for a moment. She doesn’t live in Palo Alto, nor does she live in Beverly Hills. What that means is, we have to be mindful about her data plan and how much it would cost for her to be sending out a continuous stream of data.

There’s another challenge that not everyone in the medical profession is comfortable talking about. And that is, that Jane does not have the most trust in the medical establishment. She, people like her, her ancestors, have not had the best experiences at the hands of doctors and the hospital or insurance companies. That means that we have to be mindful of questions of privacy. Jane might not feel that happy about all that data being processed into the cloud. And Jane cannot be fooled; she reads the news. She knows that if the federal government can be hacked, if the Fortune 500 can be hacked, so can her doctor. And so with that in mind, we had an epiphany.

We cannot outsmart all the hackers in the world, but perhaps we can present them a smaller target. What if we could actually, rather than have those algorithms that do data interpretation run in the cloud, what if we have those algorithms run on those small integrated circuits embedded into those adhesives? And so when we integrate these things together, what this means is that now we can think about the future where someone like Jane can still go about living her normal daily life, she can be monitored, it can be done in a way where she doesn’t have to get another job to pay her data plan, and we can also address some of her concerns about privacy.

So at this point, we’re feeling very good about ourselves. We’ve accomplished this, we’ve begun to address some of these questions about privacy and we feel like, pretty much the chapter is closed now. Everyone lived happily ever after, right? Well, not so fast.

One of the things we have to remember, as I mentioned earlier, is that Jane does not have the most trust in the medical establishment. We have to remember that there are increasing and widening health disparities, and there’s inequity in terms of proper care management. And so what that means is that this simple picture of Jane and her data — even with her being comfortable being wirelessly transmitted to the cloud, letting a doctor intervene if necessary — is not the whole story.

So what we’re beginning to do is to think about ways to have trusted parties serve as intermediaries between people like Jane and her health care providers. For example, we’ve begun to partner with churches and to think about nurses that are church members, that come from that trusted community, as patient advocates and health coaches to people like Jane.

Another thing we have going for us is that insurance companies, increasingly, are attracted to some of these ideas. They’re increasingly realizing that perhaps it’s better to pay one dollar now for a wearable device and a health coach, rather than paying 10 dollars later, when that baby is born prematurely and ends up in the neonatal intensive care unit — one of the most expensive parts of a hospital.

This has been a long learning process for us. This iterative process of breaking through and attacking one problem and not feeling totally comfortable, and identifying the next problem, has helped us go along this path of actually trying to not only innovate with this technology but make sure it can be used for people who perhaps need it the most.

Another learning lesson we’ve taken from this process that is very humbling, is that as technology progresses and advances at an accelerating rate, we have to remember that human beings are using this technology, and we have to be mindful that these human beings — they have a face, they have a name and a life. And in the case of Jane, hopefully, two.

Thank you.

「病院でのケアを自宅にもたらす一時的なタトゥー(A temporary tattoo that brings hospital care to the home)」の和訳

どうぞ、ジェーンを紹介します。彼女はハイリスクの妊娠をしています。妊娠24週以内で、病院で安静にしており、早産の兆候をモニタリングされています。彼女はあまり幸せそうには見えません。その理由の一つは、子宮の収縮をモニタリングするために、技術者や専門家が大きなベルトを彼女に装着しなければならないからです。もう一つの理由は、彼女が心配しているからです。特に、10日間の安静入院が終わった後に何が起こるかを心配しています。もし彼女がこの時期に出産することになったら、それは壊滅的です。アフリカ系アメリカ人女性として、早産や死産のリスクが二倍高いのです。ジェーンには基本的に二つの選択肢しかありません。出産まで病院で安静にして、技術に囚われた囚人のような生活を送り、その後一生かけてその医療費を支払うか、10日間の入院後に自宅に戻って、最善を願うか。どちらの選択肢も魅力的ではありません。

こういった話を考えたり、聞いたりしているうちに、私は自問し、想像し始めました。代替案はないのか?病院で信頼できるパートナーと一緒に得られる高精度なモニタリングの利点を、日常生活を送りながら自宅で得る方法はないのか?その考えを念頭に置いて、私は研究グループの人々に賢い材料科学者と協力するように勧めました。そして、私たちは集まり、ブレインストーミングをしました。長いプロセスの末に、私たちはビジョン、アイデアとして、ジュエリーのように身につけることができるシステムや、バンドエイドのように自分で装着できるシステムを考え出しました。多くの試行錯誤と長年の努力の結果、私たちはこの柔軟な電子パッチを開発することができました。このパッチはコンピュータチップを製造するのと同じプロセスで製造されており、半導体ウェハーから人間の体とインターフェースできる柔軟な素材に電子部品が転送されています。これらのシステムは人間の髪の毛の厚さくらいで、体の動き、体温、体の電気リズムなど、私たちが必要とする情報を測定することができます。また、これらのシステムにはエネルギー源を統合し、無線伝送機能を持たせることができます。私たちはこれらのシステムを構築し始めると、研究グループ内で自分たち自身にテストを行いました。しかし、それだけでなく、サンディエゴの臨床パートナーに連絡を取り、ジェーンのような妊婦を含むさまざまな臨床状態の患者に対してもテストを行い始めました。

こちらの写真は、大学病院で陣痛中の妊婦が従来のベルトを使って子宮収縮をモニタリングされている様子です。さらに、私たちの柔軟な電子パッチも装着されています。この写真には胎児の心拍数に関連する波形が示されており、赤色は従来のベルトで取得されたもので、青色は私たちの柔軟な電子システムとアルゴリズムを使って得られたものです。

この瞬間、私たちは心の中で大きなハイタッチを交わしました。私たちが想像していたことのいくつかが実際に臨床の場で実現しているのを目の当たりにしたのです。しかし、まだ問題がありました。これらのシステムの製造方法は非常に非効率的で、収率が低く、エラーが多発していました。さらに、病院の看護師からは、私たちの電子機器が通常の医療用接着剤と併用できるようにすることを求められました。そこで、私たちは「接着剤と併用するのではなく、接着剤に統合してしまえば、製造問題も解決するのではないか」とひらめいたのです。この写真にあるように、私たちはセンサーをスコッチテープのような接着剤に組み込むことに成功しました。ウェーハから剥がすだけで、このように簡単にセンサーを埋め込むことができました。現在の研究グループでは、集積回路を柔軟な接着剤に組み込むことで、信号の増幅やデジタル化、処理、無線送信のエンコードなどを行えるようにする作業も進めています。これらすべてが、病院で使用されている通常の医療用接着剤に統合されているのです。

この段階に到達したとき、私たちにはエンジニアリング面や実用性の観点から、実際に使用できるようにするためのさらなる課題が残っていました。多くのデジタルヘルスの議論では、データを単にデジタル化し、無線で送信し、クラウドに送って、そこで意味のある情報を抽出するという考えが信じられています。そして実際、そのようなことは可能ですが、エネルギーの課題については考慮する必要があります。ジェーンのことを考えてみてください。彼女はパロアルトやビバリーヒルズには住んでいません。つまり、彼女のデータプランや、連続的なデータ送信のコストについても考慮しなければならないのです。

もう一つの課題は、医療専門家全員が話しやすいわけではないということです。それは、ジェーンが医療機関に対してあまり信頼を持っていないということです。彼女や彼女のような人々、彼女の祖先たちは、医者や病院、保険会社から最良の体験をしてこなかったのです。これは、プライバシーの問題についても配慮しなければならないことを意味します。ジェーンは、すべてのデータがクラウドで処理されることに対してあまり快く思わないかもしれません。ジェーンはだまされることはありません。彼女はニュースを読みます。連邦政府がハッキングされるなら、フォーチュン500の企業がハッキングされるなら、彼女の医者もハッキングされる可能性があることを知っています。そこで、私たちはひらめきました。

世界中のすべてのハッカーを出し抜くことはできませんが、ターゲットを小さくすることはできるかもしれません。データの解釈を行うアルゴリズムをクラウドで実行するのではなく、これらの接着剤に埋め込まれた小さな集積回路で実行することができるならどうでしょうか。そして、これらを統合することで、ジェーンのような人が普通の日常生活を送りながら監視され、そのためにデータプランを支払うための別の仕事を得る必要がなくなり、プライバシーに対する懸念にも対応できる未来を考えることができるのです。

この時点で、私たちは非常に満足感を感じています。この目標を達成し、プライバシーに関するいくつかの問題にも対応し、物語はこれで終わり、皆が幸せに暮らしたと思っていました。でも、そう簡単ではありません。

先ほど述べたように、ジェーンは医療機関に対してあまり信頼を持っていないことを忘れてはなりません。医療格差が拡大し、適切なケア管理の公平性が欠如しているということも覚えておかなければなりません。つまり、ジェーンと彼女のデータのシンプルな絵は、彼女が無線でクラウドにデータを送信し、必要に応じて医者が介入することに安心していても、全体の話ではないのです。

では、私たちが始めているのは、ジェーンのような人々と彼女の医療提供者の間に信頼できる仲介者を設ける方法を考えることです。たとえば、教会と提携し、その信頼できるコミュニティから来た教会員の看護師を患者の擁護者や健康コーチとして考えています。

もう一つの利点は、保険会社がますますこうしたアイデアに惹かれていることです。保険会社は、今1ドルを支払ってウェアラブルデバイスと健康コーチを提供する方が、後で10ドルを支払って未熟児が新生児集中治療室に入るよりも良いと気づき始めています。新生児集中治療室は病院の中で最も費用がかかる場所の一つです。

これは私たちにとって長い学習プロセスでした。一つの問題を突破して攻撃し、それに完全に満足せず、次の問題を特定するというこの反復的なプロセスが、私たちがこの技術で革新を目指すだけでなく、それを最も必要としている人々が利用できるようにする道を進むのに役立ちました。

このプロセスから学んだもう一つの謙虚な教訓は、技術が加速度的に進歩する一方で、その技術を使用するのは人間であるということを忘れずにいる必要があるということです。そして、この人間たちは顔があり、名前があり、人生があるということに留意しなければならないのです。そしてジェーンの場合、その人生が二つであることを願っています。

ありがとうございました。

コメント

タイトルとURLをコピーしました