クーデターから民主主義へ:シエラレオネのリーダーシップの物語

政治

When Julius Maada Bio first seized political power in Sierra Leone in 1996, he did so to improve the lives of its citizens. But he soon realized that for democracy to flourish, its foundation needs to be built on the will of the people. After arranging an election, he voluntarily gave up power and left Africa. Twenty years later, after being democratically elected president of Sierra Leone, he reflects on the slow path to democracy, the importance of education for all and his focus on helping young Sierra Leoneans thrive.

ジュリアス・マーダは1996年にシエラレオネで政権を掌握したとき、それは国民の生活を改善するためでした。しかし、民主主義が栄えるためには、その基盤を人々の意志に築く必要があることに彼はすぐに気づきました。選挙を主催した後、彼は自発的に権力を放棄し、アフリカを去りました。20年後、シエラレオネの大統領に民主的に選出された彼は、民主主義への遅い道のり、すべての人のための教育の重要性、そして若いシエラレオネ人が繁栄するのを助けることに焦点を当てています。

タイトル
A vision for the future of Sierra Leone
シエラレオネの将来に対するビジョン
スピーカー ジュリアス・マーダ
アップロード 2019/08/22

「シエラレオネの将来に対するビジョン(A vision for the future of Sierra Leone)」の文字起こし

On Tuesday, January 16, 1996, I walked into the office of the president as head of state of the Republic of Sierra Leone. I had not been elected. Four years earlier, I was one of 30 heavily armed military officers, all in our 20s, who had driven from the war front into the capital city, Freetown. We had only one objective: to overthrow a corrupt, repressive and single-party dictatorship that had kept itself in power for over 25 years. But in the end, it wasn’t a violent coup. After we fired a few shots and seized the radio station, hundreds of thousands of citizens jumped onto the streets to welcome us as liberators. If you are thinking this seems like a movie script, I’m with you. I was part of the ruling military government, and I served in several roles. Our goal was always to return the country to democratic civilian rule. But after four years, those multiparty democratic elections had still not happened. Citizens were beginning to lose faith in our promise.

But you know what? I like to keep my promises. Some of my comrades and I staged another military coup, and this time, against our own head of state and commander. Again, it was a bloodless coup. That is how I became the new military head of state on January 16, 1996. I was still only 31 years old. Of course, power was sweet. I felt invulnerable. I had thousands of heavily armed men and aircraft at my command. I was heavily protected, and I lived in luxury. But my obligations to my nation were always superior. Millions of fellow citizens were either displaced or fleeing the violence and pillage of war. So I engaged in a series of diplomatic activities right across the subregion and convinced the reclusive rebel leader to initiate peace talks for the very first time. I also called a national consultative conference of civil society organizations and stakeholders to advise on the best way forward. In both cases, I shared with them what I believed in then and now: that Sierra Leone is bigger than all of us, and that Sierra Leone must be a secure, peaceful and just society where every person can thrive and contribute to national development.

And so, I initiated peace talks with the rebels. I organized the first multiparty democratic elections in nearly 30 years. I handed over power to the newly elected president, I retired from the army, and I left my country for the United States of America to study — all in three months.

In many a long walk, I wondered how we could get it right again as a nation. More than 20 years later, in April 2018, with a few more wrinkles and grey hair, I was again head of state. But guess what? This time I have been democratically elected.

At the polling stations last year, my three-year-old daughter, Amina, was in my arm. She insisted on holding on to my ballot paper with me. She was intent and focused. At that moment, with my ballot papers in both our hands, I fully understood the one priority for me if I was elected president of the Republic of Sierra Leone; that is: How could I make the lives of Amina and millions of other young girls and boys better in our country?

See, I believe that leadership is about creating possibilities that everyone, especially the young people, can believe in, own, work to actualize, and which they can actively fight to protect. The pathway to power and leadership can be littered with impediments, but more often, with funny questions that may seemingly defy answers: How does one take on the unique challenges of a country like Sierra Leone? We had mined mineral resources for over a hundred years, but we still are poor. We had collected foreign aid for 58 years, but we are still poor. The secret to economic development is in nature’s best resource: skilled, healthy and productive human beings. The secret to changing our country lay in enhancing and supporting the limitless potential of the next generation and challenging them to change our country. Human capital development was the key to national development in Sierra Leone.

As a candidate, I met with and listened to many young men and women right across the country and in the diaspora that were feeling disconnected from political leadership and cared little about the future of our country. How could we engage them and make them believe that the answers to transforming our nation was right in their hands?

Immediately after becoming president, I appointed some of Sierra Leone’s brightest young people as leaders, with responsibility to realize our shared vision of transforming Sierra Leone. I am grateful many of them said yes. Let me give you a few examples.

Corruption had been endemic in governance, institutions and in public life in Sierra Leone, undermining public trust and the country’s international reputation. I appointed a young attorney as Commissioner for the Anti-Corruption Commission. In less than a year, he had a hundred percent conviction rate and recovered over 1.5 million dollars of stolen money. That is seed money for building the country’s first-ever national medical diagnostic center in Sierra Leone.

The Millennium Challenge Corporation recently gave us a green scorecard for the Control of Corruption indicator, and multilateral development partners that had left Sierra Leone are now beginning to return. We are determined to break a culture of corruption and the culture of impunity that is associated with corruption.

Before I became president, I met a skinny, dreadlocked MIT/Harvard-trained inventor in London. Over coffee, I challenged him to think and plan along with me how innovation could help to drive national development in the areas of governance, revenue mobilization, health care, education, delivering public services and supporting private sector growth. How could Sierra Leone participate in the digital economy and become an innovation hub? Guess what? He left his cozy job at IBM, and he now leads a team of young men and women within the newly established Directorate of Science, Technology and Innovation in my own office.

That young man is right in here. I challenged another young Sierra Leonean woman to set up and lead the new Ministry of Planning and Economic Development. She consulted widely with Sierra Leoneans and produced, in record time, the medium-term national development plan, titled, “Education For Development.” We now have our national development needs in easily understandable clusters, and we can now plan our budgets, align development partner contributions and measure our own progress.

But the story of my government’s flagship program is even more daring, if I can call it that. Today, three out of five adults in Sierra Leone cannot read or write. Thousands of children were not able to go to school or had dropped out of school because their parents could just not afford the $20 school fees per year. Women and girls, who constitute 51 percent of our population, were not given equal opportunity to be educated. So the obvious answer is to put in place free, quality education for every Sierra Leonean child, regardless of gender, ability or ethnicity.

Great idea you’ve clapped for. Right? But the only problem is we had no money to start the program. Absolutely nothing. Development partners wanted to see data before associating with my vision. Of course, political opponents laughed at me. But I campaigned that a nation that invests in human capital development through free, quality education, affordable and high-quality health care services and food security will accelerate its national development program. I argued that for Sierra Leone to produce a highly skilled, innovative and productive workforce fit for the 21st century global economy, we needed to invest heavily in human capital development in Sierra Leone. But we had no money, because the previous government had virtually emptied the coffers. We clamped down on corruption, closed up the loopholes for fraud and waste, and we watched the money build up. We successfully launched a free, quality education program in August last year, four years, four months later. Today, two million children are going to school.

Twenty-one percent of the national budget supports free, quality education. In close collaboration and in partnership with development partners, we have now provided teaching and learning materials, safe spaces for girls, and started implementing school feeding programs across the entire country. We have even paid backlogs of salaries for teachers. Any girl admitted to university to study science, technology, engineering, mathematics and other related disciplines receives a full scholarship in Sierra Leone today.

And here is why this matters: in a few years, we will have a healthier, better educated and highly skilled young population that will lead and drive the country’s national development. They will be well-equipped to deploy science, technology and innovation. Then we’ll attract investment in diversified areas of our economy, from tourism to fisheries and from renewable energy to manufacturing. That is my biggest bet.

In my mind, this is what leadership is all about: a mission to listen with empathy to the craziest of ideas, the hopes and aspirations of a younger generation, who are just looking for a chance to be better and to make our country better. It is about letting them know that their dreams matter. It is about standing with them and asking, “Why not?” when they ask seemingly impossible questions. It is about exploring, making and owning a shared vision. The most audacious and nation-changing events or policies or even personal choices happen when we ask, “Why not?” then make bold choices and ensure those bold choices happen.

I wake up every day believing that our country should no longer be defined by the stigma of the past. The future offers hope and opportunity for all. It matters to me that young men and women right across the country can imagine for themselves that they, too, can be and are part of the story of our nation. I want to challenge them to build a nation where three-year-olds like my daughter, Yie Amie, can grow up in good governance, quality education, health care and good infrastructure. I want our children to become young men and women who can continue nourishing the trees that will grow from the seeds that we are planting today.

Now can someone tell me why we should not dare imagine that future in Sierra Leone? Thank you.

「シエラレオネの将来に対するビジョン(A vision for the future of Sierra Leone)」の和訳

1996年1月16日火曜日、私はシエラレオネ共和国の国家元首として大統領府に入りました。しかし、私は選挙で選ばれたわけではありませんでした。それより4年前、私は20代の重武装した30人の軍将校の一員として、戦線から首都フリータウンへ向かいました。我々の唯一の目的は、25年以上も権力にしがみついていた腐敗し抑圧的な一党独裁政権を打倒することでした。しかし最終的には、それは暴力的なクーデターにはなりませんでした。数発の銃声を放ち、ラジオ局を占拠した後、数十万の市民が解放者として我々を歓迎するために街頭に飛び出してきました。もし、これが映画の脚本のように感じられるなら、私も同感です。私は軍事政権の一員として、いくつかの役割を果たしました。我々の目標は常に国を民主的な民政に戻すことでした。しかし4年が経っても、複数政党制の民主選挙は行われていませんでした。市民は我々の約束に対する信頼を失いかけていました。

しかし、私には約束を守りたいという強い意志がありました。仲間の一部と私は、今度は自分たちの国家元首兼司令官に対する別の軍事クーデターを起こしました。再び、それは流血のないクーデターでした。こうして、私は1996年1月16日に新しい軍事国家元首になりました。当時私はまだ31歳でした。もちろん、権力は甘美なものでした。私は無敵に感じました。数千人の重武装した兵士と航空機が私の指揮下にありました。私は厳重に護衛され、贅沢な生活を送っていました。しかし、私の国に対する義務は常に最優先でした。何百万もの同胞市民が戦争の暴力と略奪から逃れようと避難したり国外に逃亡したりしていました。そのため、私は地域全体で一連の外交活動を行い、閉鎖的な反政府勢力のリーダーを初めて和平交渉に引き込むことに成功しました。また、市民社会組織や関係者を集めた全国協議会を開催し、今後の最良の方針について助言を求めました。その際、当時も今も信じていることを彼らと共有しました。それは、シエラレオネは我々全員よりも大きな存在であり、シエラレオネはすべての人が成長し、国の発展に貢献できる安全で平和で公正な社会でなければならないということです。

こうして、私は反政府勢力との和平交渉を開始しました。ほぼ30年ぶりに複数政党制の民主選挙を組織し、新たに選ばれた大統領に権力を引き渡し、軍を退役し、アメリカ合衆国で勉強するために自国を離れました。これらすべてを3ヶ月のうちに成し遂げました。

何度も長い散歩をしながら、私たちの国が再び正しい方向に進むためにはどうすればいいのかを考えていました。それから20年以上が経ち、2018年4月、私は再び国家元首となりました。しかし、今回は何と民主的に選ばれたのです。

昨年の投票所で、3歳の娘アミナを腕に抱いていました。彼女は私の投票用紙をしっかりと持ちたがり、真剣な表情をしていました。その瞬間、私がシエラレオネ共和国の大統領に選ばれたら最優先にすべきことが何かを深く理解しました。それは、アミナや他の何百万もの若い女の子や男の子たちの生活をどうすればより良くできるかということです。

リーダーシップとは、特に若い人々が信じ、自らのものとし、実現に向けて努力し、積極的に守りたいと思うような可能性を創り出すことだと私は信じています。権力とリーダーシップへの道は障害で満ちているかもしれませんが、しばしば答えの出ないような奇妙な質問に直面することもあります。例えば、シエラレオネのような国の独自の課題にどう立ち向かうのかということです。我々は100年以上にわたって鉱物資源を採掘してきましたが、依然として貧しいままです。58年間、外国援助を受けてきましたが、それでも貧しいままです。経済発展の秘密は、自然の最高の資源である「技能を持ち、健康で生産的な人間」にあります。私たちの国を変える鍵は、次世代の無限の可能性を高め、支援し、彼らに国を変えるよう挑戦させることにあります。人材開発こそが、シエラレオネの国民発展の鍵でした。

候補者として、私は国内外の多くの若い男性や女性と会い、話を聞きました。彼らは政治的リーダーシップから疎外感を感じ、国の未来にほとんど関心を持っていませんでした。どうすれば彼らを引き込み、国を変革する答えが彼ら自身の手の中にあると信じさせることができるのでしょうか。

大統領に就任した直後、私はシエラレオネの将来を変えるという共通のビジョンを実現するために、シエラレオネの若い優秀な人材をリーダーとして任命しました。多くの人がその挑戦を引き受けてくれたことに感謝しています。いくつかの例を挙げましょう。

シエラレオネでは、腐敗が政府機関や公共生活に蔓延し、国民の信頼や国際的な評価を損なっていました。そこで、私は若い弁護士を反腐敗委員会の委員長に任命しました。彼は1年も経たないうちに、100%の有罪判決率を達成し、150万ドル以上の盗まれた資金を回収しました。この資金は、シエラレオネ初の国立医療診断センターを建設するための種銭となります。

ミレニアム・チャレンジ・コーポレーションは最近、腐敗防止指標でシエラレオネにグリーンスコアカードを与え、多国間の開発パートナーがシエラレオネから離れていたが、今では再び戻り始めています。我々は、腐敗の文化とそれに伴う免責の文化を断ち切る決意をしています。

大統領になる前、私はロンドンで痩せたドレッドヘアのMIT/ハーバード卒の発明家と出会いました。コーヒーを飲みながら、私は彼に、ガバナンス、収入動員、医療、教育、公共サービスの提供、民間セクターの成長支援など、イノベーションが国の発展を促進する方法について一緒に考えて計画するよう挑戦しました。シエラレオネがデジタル経済に参加し、イノベーションの中心地となるためにはどうすればよいのか。なんと、彼はIBMでの快適な仕事を辞め、私のオフィスに新設された科学技術革新局で若い男女のチームを率いるようになりました。

その若者は今ここにいます。私は、もう一人の若いシエラレオネ人の女性に、新しい計画・経済開発省を設立し、率いるように挑戦しました。彼女は広範にシエラレオネ人と相談し、短期間で「教育による発展」という中期的な国家発展計画を作成しました。これにより、私たちは国家の発展ニーズを分かりやすく整理し、予算を計画し、開発パートナーの貢献を調整し、自分たちの進捗を測定できるようになりました。

しかし、私の政府の目玉プログラムの話は、さらに大胆なものです。今日、シエラレオネの成人の3分の2が読み書きできません。何千人もの子供たちが学校に行けない、または中退していました。親が年間20ドルの学費を払えないからです。人口の51%を占める女性や女の子には、教育の機会が平等に与えられていませんでした。そこで、男女、能力、民族に関係なく、全てのシエラレオネの子供たちに無料で質の高い教育を提供することが明白な答えでした。

素晴らしいアイデアですね、拍手をいただけるでしょう。しかし、唯一の問題は、このプログラムを始めるためのお金が全くなかったことです。開発パートナーは、私のビジョンに賛同する前にデータを見たいと言いました。もちろん、政治的な対立者たちは私を笑いました。しかし、私は、人材開発に投資する国、すなわち無料で質の高い教育、手頃で高品質な医療サービス、そして食料安全保障に投資する国が、国の発展プログラムを加速させると主張しました。シエラレオネが21世紀のグローバル経済に適した高度なスキルを持つ、革新的で生産的な労働力を生み出すためには、シエラレオネの人材開発に大規模な投資が必要だと私は論じました。しかし、前の政府がほとんど資金を使い果たしていたため、私たちにはお金がありませんでした。そこで、私たちは腐敗を取り締まり、不正や浪費の抜け穴を塞ぎ、資金の蓄積を見守りました。そして、昨年8月、成功裏に無料の質の高い教育プログラムを開始しました。今日、200万人の子供たちが学校に通っています。

国の予算の21%が、無料で質の高い教育を支えています。開発パートナーと緊密に協力し、教職員への給与の滞納を解消し、教材を提供し、女子のための安全な場所を確保し、全国で学校給食プログラムを実施しています。さらに、科学、技術、工学、数学などの分野を大学で学ぶ女子には、全額奨学金が支給されます。

これが重要な理由は、数年後には、より健康で、より教育を受け、高度なスキルを持つ若い世代が国の発展をリードし推進するからです。彼らは科学、技術、革新を活用するための十分な準備を整えており、観光業から漁業、再生可能エネルギーから製造業まで、多岐にわたる経済分野への投資を引き寄せるでしょう。これが私の最大の賭けです。

私の考えでは、リーダーシップとは、若い世代の最も奇抜なアイデア、希望、そして夢に共感し耳を傾けることです。彼らが「なぜできないのか?」と尋ねるときに、「なぜできないのか?」と共に問いかけることです。それは、共にビジョンを共有し、そのビジョンを実現するために大胆な選択を行い、その選択を確実に実現することです。最も大胆で国を変える出来事や政策、個人的な選択は、「なぜできないのか?」という問いから始まり、大胆な選択を行い、それを実現することで生まれるのです。

私は毎日、我が国が過去の汚名に縛られるべきではないと信じています。未来はすべての人々に希望と機会を提供します。私にとって重要なのは、全国の若者たちが自分たちもこの国の物語の一部であり、未来を創造できると感じることです。彼らに、私の娘イエ・アミエのような3歳の子供たちが、良いガバナンス、質の高い教育、医療、そして良いインフラの中で成長できる国を築くことを挑戦させたいと思っています。今日、私たちが植える種から育つ木々を、次世代の若者たちが育て続ける国を築いてほしいのです。

さて、誰かが私たちに、なぜシエラレオネでその未来を想像してはいけないのかを教えてくれますか?ありがとうございました。

コメント

タイトルとURLをコピーしました