人類の知識体系を進化させるネットワークメタファーの台頭

歴史

How does knowledge grow? Sometimes it begins with one insight and grows into many branches. Infographics expert Manuel Lima explores the thousand-year history of mapping data — from languages to dynasties — using trees of information. It’s a fascinating history of visualizations, and a look into humanity’s urge to map what we know.

知識はどのように成長するのでしょうか?

時には1つの洞察から始まり、多くの枝に広がっていきます。情報グラフィックスの専門家であるマヌエル・リマが、情報の木を使って、言語から王朝までの1000年のデータマッピングの歴史を探ります。これは視覚化の興味深い歴史であり、人類が知っていることを地図にするという衝動を探るものです。

タイトル A Visual History of Human Knowledge
人類の知識の視覚的な歴史
スピーカー マヌエル・リマ
アップロード 2015/09/10

「人類の知識の視覚的な歴史(A Visual History of Human Knowledge)」の文字起こし

Over the past 10 years, I’ve been researching the way people organize and visualize information. And I’ve noticed an interesting shift. For a long period of time, we believed in a natural ranking order in the world around us, also known as the great chain of being, or “Scala naturae” in Latin, a top-down structure that normally starts with God at the very top, followed by angels, noblemen, common people, animals, and so on.

This idea was actually based on Aristotle’s ontology, which classified all things known to man in a set of opposing categories, like the ones you see behind me. But over time, interestingly enough, this concept adopted the branching schema of a tree in what became known as the Porphyrian tree, also considered to be the oldest tree of knowledge.

The branching scheme of the tree was, in fact, such a powerful metaphor for conveying information that it became, over time, an important communication tool to map a variety of systems of knowledge. We can see trees being used to map morality, with the popular tree of virtues and tree of vices, as you can see here, with these beautiful illustrations from medieval Europe. We can see trees being used to map consanguinity, the various blood ties between people. We can also see trees being used to map genealogy, perhaps the most famous archetype of the tree diagram. I think many of you in the audience have probably seen family trees. Many of you probably even have your own family trees drawn in such a way.

We can see trees even mapping systems of law, the various decrees and rulings of kings and rulers. And finally, of course, also a very popular scientific metaphor, we can see trees being used to map all species known to man. And trees ultimately became such a powerful visual metaphor because in many ways, they really embody this human desire for order, for balance, for unity, for symmetry.

However, nowadays we are really facing new complex, intricate challenges that cannot be understood by simply employing a simple tree diagram. And a new metaphor is currently emerging, and it’s currently replacing the tree in visualizing various systems of knowledge. It’s really providing us with a new lens to understand the world around us. And this new metaphor is the metaphor of the network.

We can see this shift from trees into networks in many domains of knowledge. We can see this shift in the way we try to understand the brain. While before, we used to think of the brain as a modular, centralized organ, where a given area was responsible for a set of actions and behaviors, the more we know about the brain, the more we think of it as a large music symphony, played by hundreds and thousands of instruments. This is a beautiful snapshot created by the Blue Brain Project, where you can see 10,000 neurons and 30 million connections. And this is only mapping 10 percent of a mammalian neocortex.

We can also see this shift in the way we try to conceive of human knowledge. These are some remarkable trees of knowledge, or trees of science, by Spanish scholar Ramon Llull. And Llull was actually the precursor, the very first one who created the metaphor of science as a tree, a metaphor we use every single day, when we say, “Biology is a branch of science,” when we say, “Genetics is a branch of science.”

But perhaps the most beautiful of all trees of knowledge, at least for me, was created for the French encyclopedia by Diderot and d’Alembert in 1751.

This was really the bastion of the French Enlightenment, and this gorgeous illustration was featured as a table of contents for the encyclopedia. And it actually maps out all domains of knowledge as separate branches of a tree. But knowledge is much more intricate than this.

These are two maps of Wikipedia showing the inter-linkage of articles — related to history on the left, and mathematics on the right. And I think by looking at these maps and other ones that have been created of Wikipedia — arguably one of the largest rhizomatic structures ever created by man — we can really understand how human knowledge is much more intricate and interdependent, just like a network.

We can also see this interesting shift in the way we map social ties between people. This is the typical organization chart. I’m assuming many of you have seen a similar chart as well, in your own corporations, or others. It’s a top-down structure that normally starts with the CEO at the very top, and where you can drill down all the way to the individual workmen on the bottom. But humans sometimes are, well, actually, all humans are unique in their own way, and sometimes you really don’t play well under this really rigid structure.

I think the Internet is really changing this paradigm quite a lot. This is a fantastic map of online social collaboration between Perl developers. Perl is a famous programming language, and here, you can see how different programmers are actually exchanging files, and working together on a given project. And here, you can notice that this is a completely decentralized process — there’s no leader in this organization, it’s a network.

We can also see this interesting shift when we look at terrorism. One of the main challenges of understanding terrorism nowadays is that we are dealing with decentralized, independent cells, where there’s no leader leading the whole process. And here, you can actually see how visualization is being used. The diagram that you see behind me shows all the terrorists involved in the Madrid attack in 2004. And what they did here is, they actually segmented the network into three different years, represented by the vertical layers that you see behind me. And the blue lines tie together the people that were present in that network year after year. So even though there’s no leader per se, these people are probably the most influential ones in that organization, the ones that know more about the past, and the future plans and goals of this particular cell.

We can also see this shift from trees into networks in the way we classify and organize species. The image on the right is the only illustration that Darwin included in “The Origin of Species,” which Darwin called the “Tree of Life.” There’s actually a letter from Darwin to the publisher, expanding on the importance of this particular diagram. It was critical for Darwin’s theory of evolution. But recently, scientists discovered that overlaying this tree of life is a dense network of bacteria, and these bacteria are actually tying together species that were completely separated before, to what scientists are now calling not the tree of life, but the web of life, the network of life.

And finally, we can really see this shift, again, when we look at ecosystems around our planet. No more do we have these simplified predator-versus-prey diagrams we have all learned at school. This is a much more accurate depiction of an ecosystem. This is a diagram created by Professor David Lavigne, mapping close to 100 species that interact with the codfish off the coast of Newfoundland in Canada. And I think here, we can really understand the intricate and interdependent nature of most ecosystems that abound on our planet.

But even though recent, this metaphor of the network, is really already adopting various shapes and forms, and it’s almost becoming a growing visual taxonomy. It’s almost becoming the syntax of a new language. And this is one aspect that truly fascinates me. And these are actually 15 different typologies I’ve been collecting over time, and it really shows the immense visual diversity of this new metaphor. And here is an example.

On the very top band, you have radial convergence, a visualization model that has become really popular over the last five years. At the top left, the very first project is a gene network, followed by a network of IP addresses — machines, servers — followed by a network of Facebook friends. You probably couldn’t find more disparate topics, yet they are using the same metaphor, the same visual model, to map the never-ending complexities of its own subject. And here are a few more examples of the many I’ve been collecting, of this growing visual taxonomy of networks.

But networks are not just a scientific metaphor. As designers, researchers, and scientists try to map a variety of complex systems, they are in many ways influencing traditional art fields, like painting and sculpture, and influencing many different artists. And perhaps because networks have this huge aesthetical force to them — they’re immensely gorgeous — they are really becoming a cultural meme, and driving a new art movement, which I’ve called “networkism.”

And we can see this influence in this movement in a variety of ways. This is just one of many examples, where you can see this influence from science into art. The example on your left side is IP-mapping, a computer-generated map of IP addresses; again — servers, machines. And on your right side, you have “Transient Structures and Unstable Networks” by Sharon Molloy, using oil and enamel on canvas. And here are a few more paintings by Sharon Molloy, some gorgeous, intricate paintings.

And here’s another example of that interesting cross-pollination between science and art. On your left side, you have “Operation Smile.” It is a computer-generated map of a social network. And on your right side, you have “Field 4,” by Emma McNally, using only graphite on paper. Emma McNally is one of the main leaders of this movement, and she creates these striking, imaginary landscapes, where you can really notice the influence from traditional network visualization.

But networkism doesn’t happen only in two dimensions. This is perhaps one of my favorite projects of this new movement. And I think the title really says it all — it’s called: “Galaxies Forming Along Filaments, Like Droplets Along the Strands of a Spider’s Web.” And I just find this particular project to be immensely powerful. It was created by Tomas Saraceno, and he occupies these large spaces, creates these massive installations using only elastic ropes. As you actually navigate that space and bounce along those elastic ropes, the entire network kind of shifts, almost like a real organic network would.

And here’s yet another example of networkism taken to a whole different level. This was created by Japanese artist Chiharu Shiota in a piece called “In Silence.” And Chiharu, like Tomas Saraceno, fills these rooms with this dense network, this dense web of elastic ropes and black wool and thread, sometimes including objects, as you can see here, sometimes even including people, in many of her installations.

But networks are also not just a new trend, and it’s too easy for us to dismiss it as such. Networks really embody notions of decentralization, of interconnectedness, of interdependence. And this new way of thinking is critical for us to solve many of the complex problems we are facing nowadays, from decoding the human brain, to understanding the vast universe out there.

On your left side, you have a snapshot of a neural network of a mouse — very similar to our own at this particular scale. And on your right side, you have the Millennium Simulation. It was the largest and most realistic simulation of the growth of cosmic structure. It was able to recreate the history of 20 million galaxies in approximately 25 terabytes of output. And coincidentally or not, I just find this particular comparison between the smallest scale of knowledge — the brain — and the largest scale of knowledge — the universe itself — to be really quite striking and fascinating.

Because as Bruce Mau once said, “When everything is connected to everything else, for better or for worse, everything matters.” Thank you so much.

「人類の知識の視覚的な歴史(A Visual History of Human Knowledge)」の和訳

過去10年間、私は人々が情報を整理し視覚化する方法について研究してきました。そして、興味深い変化に気づきました。長い間、私たちは世界には自然な順位が存在するという考えを信じていました。これは「存在の大鎖」やラテン語で「スカラ・ナトゥラエ」とも呼ばれ、通常は神が頂点に立ち、その次に天使、貴族、一般人、動物などが続くというトップダウンの構造です。

この考え方は実際にはアリストテレスの存在論に基づいており、彼はすべての物事を対立するカテゴリーに分類しました。このように後ろのスライドに示されているようなものです。しかし、興味深いことに、この概念は時間の経過とともに「ポルフィリアの樹」として知られる樹状のスキーマを採用し、知識の最古の樹と見なされるようになりました。

樹の分岐スキーマは情報を伝える非常に強力なメタファーであり、時間の経過とともに様々な知識体系をマッピングする重要なコミュニケーションツールになりました。道徳をマッピングするために樹が使われた例として、人気のある「美徳の樹」と「悪徳の樹」の中世ヨーロッパの美しいイラストがあります。血縁関係をマッピングするためにも樹が使われており、家系図はその最も有名な樹状図の典型です。多くの方が家系図を見たことがあると思いますし、自分自身の家系図をこのように描いたことがある方もいるでしょう。

法律体系をマッピングするためにも樹が使われており、王や統治者の様々な布告や判決を示しています。そして、もちろん、科学のメタファーとしても非常に人気があり、樹はすべての既知の種をマッピングするために使われました。樹は最終的に非常に強力な視覚的メタファーとなりました。なぜなら、樹は多くの点で、人間の秩序、バランス、統一、対称性への欲望を具現化しているからです。

しかし、現代では単純な樹状図を使うだけでは理解できない新しい複雑で込み入った課題に直面しています。そして、新しいメタファーが現在台頭しており、さまざまな知識体系の視覚化において樹を置き換えつつあります。この新しいメタファーはネットワークのメタファーです。

この樹からネットワークへのシフトは、さまざまな知識分野で見られます。脳の理解においてもこのシフトが見られます。以前は脳をモジュール化された中央集権的な器官と考えており、特定のエリアが特定の行動や機能を担当しているとされていました。しかし、脳についての知識が増えるにつれて、脳は数百から数千の楽器が奏でる大規模な交響曲のようなものだと考えるようになってきました。これはブルーブレインプロジェクトによって作成された美しいスナップショットで、1万個のニューロンと3,000万の接続が描かれています。しかもこれは哺乳類の新皮質の10%しかマッピングしていません。

また、人間の知識の捉え方にもこのシフトが見られます。これはスペインの学者ラモン・リュイによる、非常に優れた知識の樹、あるいは科学の樹です。リュイは科学を樹としてメタファー化した最初の人物であり、毎日のように「生物学は科学の一分野である」とか「遺伝学は科学の一分野である」と言うときに使うメタファーを作り出しました。

しかし、私にとって最も美しい知識の樹は、おそらく1751年にディドロとダランベールがフランス百科全書のために作成したものです。

これはフランス啓蒙思想の砦とも言えるもので、この美しい図は百科全書の目次として紹介されました。実際には、全ての知識分野を樹の枝として描いています。しかし、知識はこれ以上に複雑です。

こちらはWikipediaのマップで、記事間のリンクを示しています。左が歴史に関するもので、右が数学に関するものです。これらのマップや、他のWikipediaのマップを見ることで、人間の知識がいかに複雑で相互依存的であるかが理解できます。Wikipediaは、おそらく人類が作り出した中で最も巨大な根茎構造の一つと言えるでしょうが、その中で知識がネットワークのように絡み合っているのがわかります。

また、人間関係のマッピング方法にもこの興味深いシフトが見られます。こちらは典型的な組織図です。皆さんの企業や他の企業でも同様の図を見たことがあるでしょう。これはCEOが頂点に位置し、下に向かって個々の作業員に至るトップダウン構造です。しかし、人間は、実際には全ての人間がそれぞれ独自の方法でユニークであり、この非常に厳格な構造の下ではうまく機能しないこともあります。

インターネットはこのパラダイムを大きく変えつつあります。これはPerl開発者間のオンライン共同作業の素晴らしいマップです。Perlは有名なプログラミング言語で、ここでは異なるプログラマーが実際にファイルを交換し、プロジェクトに共同で取り組んでいる様子が見られます。この組織にはリーダーが存在せず、完全に分散化されたプロセスであることがわかります。これはまさにネットワークです。

この興味深いシフトは、テロリズムの観点からも見て取れます。今日のテロリズムを理解する上での主要な課題の一つは、分散化された独立したセルで構成されており、全体を指揮するリーダーが存在しないことです。ここで示している図は、2004年のマドリード攻撃に関与したテロリスト全員を表しています。ここでは、ネットワークを3つの異なる年に分け、それを垂直の層で表現しています。青い線は、年をまたいでそのネットワークに存在していた人々を結びつけています。リーダーがいないにもかかわらず、これらの人々はおそらくその組織で最も影響力があり、過去のことや将来の計画について最も知識を持っている人々です。

また、種の分類と整理方法においても、この樹からネットワークへのシフトが見られます。右の画像は、ダーウィンが「種の起源」に含めた唯一の図で、ダーウィンが「生命の樹」と呼んだものです。この特定の図の重要性を説明する手紙をダーウィンが出版社に送ったこともあります。これはダーウィンの進化論にとって非常に重要でした。しかし最近、科学者たちは、この生命の樹に重なる密な細菌のネットワークを発見しました。これらの細菌は、以前は完全に分離していた種を結びつけており、科学者たちはこれを「生命の樹」ではなく、「生命の網」、つまり生命のネットワークと呼ぶようになっています。

そして最後に、地球上の生態系を見たときにも、このシフトが見て取れます。もはや学校で学んだような単純な捕食者対被食者の図は存在しません。こちらは、生態系のより正確な描写です。これはデイビッド・ラヴィーン教授が作成した図で、カナダのニューファンドランド沖に生息するタラと約100種の生物の相互作用をマッピングしています。ここでは、地球上にあふれるほとんどの生態系の複雑で相互依存的な性質を理解することができると思います。

しかし、このネットワークのメタファーは最近のものであるにもかかわらず、既にさまざまな形態や形式を採用し、まるで成長する視覚的な分類体系のようになっています。これは新しい言語の構文にもなりつつあり、私はこの点に非常に魅了されています。ここに、私が収集してきた15種類の異なるタイプがあり、この新しいメタファーの視覚的な多様性を示しています。以下にその例を示します。

最上段には、放射状収束という視覚化モデルがあり、これは過去5年間で非常に人気が高まりました。左上にある最初のプロジェクトは遺伝子ネットワークで、その次にIPアドレスのネットワーク(マシンやサーバー)、そしてFacebookの友人のネットワークが続いています。これらは全く異なるトピックですが、それぞれの主題の無限の複雑さをマッピングするために、同じメタファー、同じ視覚モデルを使用しています。これが私が収集してきた、成長するネットワークの視覚的分類体系のいくつかの例です。

しかし、ネットワークは単なる科学的なメタファーではありません。デザイナー、研究者、科学者たちがさまざまな複雑なシステムをマッピングしようとする中で、彼らは伝統的な芸術分野、例えば絵画や彫刻に多大な影響を与えており、多くの異なるアーティストにも影響を与えています。おそらくネットワークには巨大な美的力があるため、それは文化的なミームとなり、新しい芸術運動を駆動しているのです。私はこれを「ネットワーク主義」と呼んでいます。

この運動の影響をさまざまな方法で見ることができます。これはその多くの例の一つで、科学から芸術への影響を示しています。左側の例はIPマッピングで、コンピューター生成されたIPアドレスの地図です。一方、右側にはシャロン・モロイによる「Transient Structures and Unstable Networks」があり、油彩とエナメルでキャンバスに描かれています。こちらはシャロン・モロイによる他の絵画で、美しく複雑な作品です。

そして、科学と芸術のこの興味深い交差のもう一つの例があります。左側は「Operation Smile」というコンピューター生成されたソーシャルネットワークの地図です。右側はエマ・マクナリーの「Field 4」で、彼女は紙にグラファイトのみを使用して描いています。エマ・マクナリーはこの運動の主要なリーダーの一人であり、彼女は伝統的なネットワークの視覚化から影響を受けた印象的な架空の風景を作り出しています。

しかし、ネットワーク主義は二次元だけで起こるわけではありません。これはこの新しい運動の中で私のお気に入りのプロジェクトの一つです。そのタイトルが全てを物語っています。それは「銀河が蜘蛛の巣の糸のようにフィラメントに沿って形成される」と呼ばれています。私はこの特定のプロジェクトが非常に強力だと思います。これはトマス・サラセーノによって作成され、彼は大規模な空間を占有し、弾性ロープだけを使用して巨大なインスタレーションを作成します。その空間を実際に移動し、その弾性ロープに沿って跳ねると、全体のネットワークがまるで本物の有機的なネットワークのようにシフトします。

また、ネットワーク主義が全く別のレベルに引き上げられた例もあります。これは日本のアーティスト、塩田千春によって作成された「In Silence」という作品です。トマス・サラセーノと同様に、塩田千春はこれらの部屋を弾性ロープや黒いウールと糸で満たし、時には物体を含めることもあります。この例のように、彼女の多くのインスタレーションでは人々も含めることがあります。

しかし、ネットワークは単なる新しいトレンドではありませんし、それをそのように片付けるのは簡単すぎます。ネットワークは分散化、相互接続、相互依存の概念を体現しています。この新しい考え方は、現在私たちが直面している多くの複雑な問題を解決するために重要です。例えば、人間の脳の解読から広大な宇宙の理解まで。

左側にはマウスの神経ネットワークのスナップショットがあります。これは特定のスケールでは私たち自身のものと非常に似ています。右側にはミレニアム・シミュレーションがあります。これは宇宙構造の成長を再現するための最大かつ最も現実的なシミュレーションでした。このシミュレーションは約2500億バイトの出力で、2,000万の銀河の歴史を再現することができました。偶然かどうかは別として、知識の最小スケールである脳と最大スケールである宇宙自体とのこの特定の比較は、本当に非常に印象的で魅力的だと思います。

ブルース・マウがかつて言ったように、「すべてがすべてに繋がっているとき、それが良いことであれ悪いことであれ、すべてが重要である。」ご清聴ありがとうございました。

タイトルとURLをコピーしました