47%のアメリカ人が400ドルの緊急資金を持たない現実

お金

Millions of baby boomers are moving into their senior years with empty pockets and declining choices to earn a living. And right behind them is a younger generation facing the same challenges. In this deeply personal talk, author Elizabeth White opens up an honest conversation about financial trouble and offers practical advice for how to live a richly textured life on a limited income.

何百万人もの団塊の世代が、小遣いが空っぽになり、生計を立てるための選択肢が減ったまま高齢期を迎えています。

そして彼らのすぐ後ろには、同じ課題に直面している若い世代がいます。 この非常に個人的な講演では、著者のエリザベス・ホワイトが経済的問題について正直に語り、限られた収入で豊かな生活を送る方法について実践的なアドバイスを提供します。

タイトル
An honest look at the personal finance crisis
個人金融危機に対する正直な見方
スピーカー エリザベス・ホワイト
アップロード 2018/08/11

「個人金融危機に対する正直な見方(An honest look at the personal finance crisis)」の文字起こし

You know me. I am in your friendship circle hidden in plain sight. My clothes are still impeccable — bought in the good years when I was still making money. To look at me you would not know that my electricity was cut off last week for nonpayment, or that I meet the eligibility requirements for food stamps. But if you paid attention, you would see that sadness in my eyes — hear that hint of fear in my otherwise self-assured voice.

These days I’m buying the $1.99 trial-size jug of Tide to make ends meet. I bet you didn’t know laundry detergent came in that size. You invite me to the same expensive restaurants the two of us have always enjoyed, but I order mineral water now with a twist of lemon, not the 12-dollar glass of chardonnay. I am frugal in my menu choices. Meticulous, I count every penny in my head.

I demur dividing the table bill evenly to cover desserts and designer coffees and second and third glasses of wine I did not consume. I am tired of trying to fake appearances. A friend told me that I’m broke not poor, and there is a difference. I live without cable, my gym membership and nail appointments. I’ve discovered I can do my own hair. There is no retirement savings, no nest egg. I exhausted that long ago. There is no expensive condo to draw equity and no husband to back me up.

Months of slow pay and no pay have decimated my credit. Bill collectors call constantly, reading verbatim from a script before expressing polite sympathy for my plight and then demanding payment arrangements I can’t possibly meet. Friends wonder privately how someone so well educated could be in economic free fall. I’m still as talented as ever and smart as a whip, but work is sketchy now, mostly on and off consulting gigs.

At 55 I’ve learned how to fake cheeriness, but there are not many opportunities for work anymore. I don’t remember exactly when it stopped, but I cannot deny now having entered the uncertain world of formerly and used to be. I’m not sure anymore where I belong. What I do know is that dozens of online job applications seem to just disappear into a black hole. I’m wondering what is to become of me.

So far my health has held up, but my body aches — or is it my spirit? Homeless women used to be invisible to me but I appraise them now with curious eyes, wondering if their stories started like mine.

I wrote this piece a year ago. It’s a composite of my story and other women I know. I wrote it because I was tired of pretending I was all right when I wasn’t. I was tired of faking normal. I wasn’t seeing myself in the popular press. Nobody I knew was traveling the world or buying a condo in Costa Rica. Very few of my friends had set aside the 15 to 20 percent experts tell us we need to maintain our standard of living in retirement.

My friends, many in their 50s and 60s, were looking at a downward mobility, a work-for-life proposition, just a job loss, medical diagnosis or divorce away from insolvency. We may not have hit rock bottom, but many of us saw a sequence of events where rock bottom was possible for the first time. And the truth is, it really doesn’t take much. The median household in the US only has enough savings to replace one month of income. Forty-seven percent of us cannot pull together 400 dollars to deal with an emergency. That’s almost half of us.

A major car repair and we’re standing on the abyss. You wouldn’t know it to look around you — I’m not the only one in this situation. There are people in this room who are in the same predicament, and if it’s not you, it is your parents or your sister or maybe your best friend. We get good at faking normal. Shame keeps us silent and siloed. When I first decided I was going to come out with my story, I did a website and a friend noticed that there were no photos of me — it was all kind of cartoons like this. Even as I was coming out, I was still hiding.

We live in a world where success is defined by income. When you say that you have money problems, you’re announcing pretty much that you’re a loser. When you’re a graduate of Harvard Business School as I am, you’re some kind of double loser. We boomers hear a lot about how we have underfunded our retirement; how it’s all our fault. Why on earth would we draw down our 401(k) plan to cover the shortfall on our mother-in-law’s nursing home care, or to pay for our kid’s tuition, or just to survive? We’re accused of being poor planners and deadbeats — all that money we spent on lattes and bottled water. To shame and blame is so deliciously tempting. Many of us don’t even wait for others to do it we’re so busy doing it to ourselves.

I say let’s own our part: we all could have saved more. I know I could have saved more, and if you were to rifle through my life over the last 30 years, you would see more than one dumb thing I have done financially. I can’t change that now and neither can you, but let’s not mix up individual, isolated behavior with the systemic factors that have caused a 7.7-trillion-dollar retirement income gap. Millions of boomer-age Americans did not land here because of too many trips to Starbucks. We spent the last three decades dealing with flat and falling wages and disappearing pensions and through-the-roof cost on housing and health care and education. It used to not be like this.

We all remember the three-legged retirement income stool which had the savings and pension and social security. Well, that stool has gone wobbly. Take savings — what savings? For many families, there’s just nothing left to save after the bills have been paid. The pension leg of the stool has also gone wobbly. We can remember when many people had pensions. Today only 13 percent of American workers are employed by companies that offer them. So what did we get instead? We got 401(k)-type plans and suddenly responsibility for retirement planning got shifted from our companies to us.

We got the reigns but we also got the risk, and it turns out that millions of us just aren’t that good at voluntarily investing over 40 years. Millions of us just aren’t that good at managing market risk. And really the numbers tell the story. Half of all American households have no retirement savings at all. That would be zero. No 401(k), no IRA, not a dime. Among 55-to-64-year-olds who do have a retirement account, the median value of that account is 104,000 dollars. Now, 104,000 dollars does sound better than zero, but as an annuity, it generates about 300 dollars. I don’t have to tell you that you can’t live on that.

With savings down, pensions becoming a relic of the past and 401(k) plans failing millions of Americans, many near-retirees are dependent on social security as their retirement plan. But here’s the problem.

Social security was never supposed to be the retirement plan. It’s not nearly enough. At best it replaces something like 40 percent of your pre-retirement income. Things have changed a lot from when social security was introduced back in 1935. Then, a 21-year-old male had a 50 percent chance of living until he was 65. So he retired at 60, did a little fishing, kissed his grandkids, got his gold watch — he’d be dead within five years of receiving benefits. That’s not the pattern today. If you’re in your late 50s and in good health, you’re going to live easily another 20 or 25 years. That’s a really long time to make ends meet if you are broke.

So what’s the play if you’ve landed here and you’re 50 or 55 or 60? What’s the play if you don’t want to land here and you’re 22 or 32? Here’s what I’ve learned from my own experience. The cavalry’s not coming. There is no big rescue, no prince charming, no big bailout in the works. To have a shot at something other than being old and poor in America, we’re going to have to save ourselves and each other. I’ve had to come out of the shadows, stand here openly, and I’m inviting you to do so as well. I’m not going to tell you that it’s not easy.

I ventured though to tell my story because I thought it would make it a little easier for people to tell theirs. I think it’s only through our strength in numbers that we can begin to change the national “la-la” conversation that we are having on this retirement crisis. With so many of us shell-shocked and adrift about what has happened to us, we’re going to have to build up from the grassroots, forming what I think are resilience circles. These are small groups of people coming together to talk about what has happened to them, to share resources and information and to begin to figure out a way forward.

I believe from this base that we can find our voices again and sound the alarm — start pushing our institutions and policymakers to go hard on this retirement crisis with the urgency it deserves. In the meantime — and there is an “in the meantime” — we’re going to have to adopt a live-low-to-the-ground mindset, drastically cutting back on our expenses. And I don’t mean just living within our means. A lot of people are already doing that. What is called for now is to, in a much deeper way, ask ourselves what it really means to live a life that is not defined by things.

I call it “smalling up.” Smalling up is figuring out what you really need to feel contented and grounded. I have a friend who drives really beat-up, raggedy cars, but he will scrimp and save 15,000 dollars at one point to buy a flute because music is what really matters to him. He smalls up. I’ve had to also let go of magical thinking — this idea that if I just was patient enough and tightened my belt that things would go back to normal. If I just sent in one more CV or applied to one more job online or attended one more networking event that surely I’d get the kind of job I was used to having. Surely things would return to normal.

The truth is I’m not going back and neither are you. The normal that we knew is over.

In this new place that we are, we’re going to be asked to do things that we don’t want to do. We’re going to be asked to take assignments that we think are beneath our station and our talent and our skill. I have had to get off my throne. Last year, a good friend of mine asked me if I would help her with some organization work. I assumed she meant community organizing along the lines of what President Obama did in Chicago. She meant organizing somebody’s closet. I said, “I’m not doing that.” She said, “Get off your throne. Money is green.”

It’s not easy being part of the advance team that is ushering in this new era of work and living. First is always hardest. First is before there are networks and pathways and role models… before there are policies and ways to show us how to go forward. We’re in the middle of a seismic shift, and we’re going to have to find bridgework to get us through. Bridgework is what we do in the meantime; bridgework is what we do while we’re trying to figure out what is next. Bridgework is also letting go of this notion that our worth and our value depend on our income and our titles and our jobs.

Bridgework can look crazy or cool depending on how you were rolling when your personal financial crisis hit. I have friends with PhDs who are working at the Container Store or driving Uber or Lyft, and then I have other friends who are partnering with other boomers and doing really cool entrepreneurial ventures. Bridgework doesn’t mean that we don’t want to build on our past careers, that we don’t want meaningful work. We do. Bridgework is what we do in the meantime while we’re figuring out what is next.

I’ve also learned to think strategy not failure when I’m sort of processing all these things that I don’t want to do. And I say that that’s an approach that I would invite you to consider as well. So if you need to move in with your brother to make ends meet, call him. If you need to take in a boarder to help you pay your mortgage or pay your rent, do it. If you need to get food stamps, get the darn food stamps. AARP says only a third of older adults who are eligible actually get them. Do what you need to do to go another round. Know that there are millions of us. Come out of the shadows. Cut back, small up; think strategy, not failure; get off your throne and find the bridgework to get your through the lean times.

As a country, we have achieved longevity, investing billions of dollars in the diagnosis, treatment and management of disease. It’s not enough to just live a long time. We want to live well. We haven’t invested nearly as much in the physical infrastructure to ensure that that happens. We need now a new way of thinking about what it means to be old in America. And we need guidance and ideas about how to live a richly textured life on a much more modest income.

So I am calling on change agents and social entrepreneurs, artists and elders and impact investors. I’m calling on developers and disrupters of the status quo. We need you to help us imagine how to invest in the services and products and infrastructure that will support our dignity, our independence and our well-being in these many, many decades that we’re going to live. My journey has taken me from a place of fear and shame to one of humility and understanding. I’m ready now to link shields with others, to fight this fight, and I’m inviting you to join me. Thank you.

「個人金融危機に対する正直な見方(An honest look at the personal finance crisis)」の和訳

あなたは、私のことを知っています。私は、あなたの友人の中に、見えないところに隠れています。私の服はまだ素晴らしく、お金を稼いでいた良い時代に買ったものです。私を見ても、先週非支払いのために電気を切られたことや、食料品切符の資格要件を満たしていることはわかりません。しかし、もし注意して見れば、私の目の中の悲しみを見ることができます──私の自信に満ちた声に微かな恐れが感じられるでしょう。

最近は、やりくりをするために1.99ドルの試供品サイズのタイドを買っています。あなたがそのようなサイズがあることを知らなかったと思います。あなたは私を、私たちがいつも楽しんでいた高級レストランに招待しますが、私は今、レモンの絞り入りのミネラルウォーターを注文します。12ドルのシャルドネのグラスではありません。メニューの選択では倹約します。細心の注意を払い、頭の中で毎ペニーを数えます。

私は、デザートやデザイナーコーヒー、飲んでいない2杯目や3杯目のワインを均等に分割して支払うことを遠慮します。もう、外見を偽るのは疲れました。友達が言った、私は貧乏ではなく、お金がないということです。違いがあります。ケーブルはありませんし、ジムの会員権やネイルの予約もありません。自分で髪をやることができることを発見しました。退職金の貯金はありませんし、巣箱もありません。私はそれをずっと前に使い果たしました。高価なコンドミニアムから資産を引き出すことも、私を支える夫もありません。

遅延した支払いや未払いの数ヶ月で、私の信用は大きく損なわれました。請求集金業者は絶えず電話をかけてきて、きちんとしたスクリプトを読んだ後、私の窮状に対する礼儀正しい同情を表明し、支払い条件を要求しますが、私が不可能な支払いをすることができないのです。友人たちは、なぜ教育を受けた人間が経済的に窮地に陥るのかと、内心で疑問に思っています。私は今も昔と同じくらい才能があり、頭の回転が速いのですが、仕事は不安定で、ほとんどは断続的なコンサルティングの仕事です。

55歳になり、明るいふりをする方法を学びましたが、もはや仕事の機会はほとんどありません。いつそれが止まったのか、正確には覚えていませんが、今、以前の世界と使われた世界に入ったことを否定できません。私がどこに属しているのか、もはやわかりません。私が知っていることは、数十のオンラインの求人応募がどういうわけか見えなくなっていることです。私は自分の将来について考えています。

今のところ、健康は持ちこたえていますが、体が痛む──それとも心が痛むのでしょうか?かつては私にとって無視されていたホームレスの女性たちも、今では興味深い目で評価しています。彼女たちの物語が私のように始まったのか、と思っています。

私はこの記事を1年前に書きました。これは私の物語と私が知っている他の女性の物語を合成したものです。私は、私が大丈夫だと偽るのに疲れ、普通のフリをするのにも疲れました。私は人気のある報道で自分自身を見ていませんでした。私が知っている誰もが世界を旅したり、コスタリカでコンドミニアムを買ったりしているわけではありませんでした。私の友人のほとんどが、専門家が私たちに必要だと言っている15?20%を退職後の生活水準を維持するために蓄えることはほとんどありませんでした。

私の友人たちは、50代や60代の多くが、下降するモビリティ、一生働くことを前提とした提案、仕事の喪失、医学的診断、離婚から破産までの道を見ていました。私たちは底をついていないかもしれませんが、多くの人々が初めて底なし沼に陥る可能性のある一連の出来事を目にしました。そして真実は、それには本当に多くのことが必要ありません。米国の平均世帯の貯蓄は、収入の1か月分しか代替できません。私たちの47%が緊急事態に対処するために400ドルを集めることができません。ほぼ半分の人々です。

大規模な自動車修理があれば、私たちは深淵の縁に立っています。周りを見渡してもわかりませんが、私だけがこの状況にいるわけではありません。この部屋には、同じ困難な状況にある人がいて、もしそれがあなたでなければ、それはあなたの両親、姉妹、またはおそらく親友です。私たちは普通のフリをするのが得意になります。恥が私たちを黙らせ、孤立させます。私が最初に私の物語を出すと決めたとき、友人が私の写真がないことに気付きました──すべてこのような漫画のようでした。出ていくと決めているにもかかわらず、まだ隠していました。

私たちは、成功が収入で定義される世界に生きています。お金の問題があると言うと、あなたが敗者であることをほぼ公表しています。私のようにハーバード・ビジネス・スクールの卒業生であると、あなたはある種の二重の敗者です。私たちのボーマー世代は、退職金を十分に貯めていないということをよく聞きます。それが全て私たちのせいだと。なぜ401(k)プランの不足分を義理の母親の介護施設の費用、子供の学費、または生存のために引き出すのでしょうか?私たちは計画不足で不誠実者と非難されます──私たちがラテやボトル入り水に費やしたお金の全て。恥じることと非難することは非常に魅力的です。多くの人々は、他人がそれをするのを待たずに、自分自身にそれをしているほど忙しいのです。

私たちが自分たちの一部を所有しましょう:私たちは皆、もっとたくさんのお金を節約することができました。私ももっと節約できたと思いますし、過去30年間の私の生活を見てみれば、私が経済的に愚かなことを一つ以上やってきたのがわかるでしょう。今それを変えることはできませんし、あなたも同じですが、個々の孤立した行動と、7700億ドルの退職所得格差を引き起こしたシステム上の要因を混同しないでしょう。何百万ものボーマー世代のアメリカ人がここに辿り着いたのは、スターバックスへの訪問が多すぎるからではありません。過去30年間、私たちは平らで下降し続ける賃金、消える年金、そして住宅、医療、教育の費用の高騰と闘ってきました。以前はこんなことではありませんでした。

私たちはみな、貯蓄と年金、社会保障という3本足の退職所得の踏み台を覚えています。しかし、その踏み台は不安定になりました。貯蓄は──何の貯蓄?多くの家族にとって、請求書を支払った後に節約する余裕がありません。年金の部分も不安定になっています。かつては多くの人々が年金を持っていましたが、今日、アメリカの労働者のうちわずか13%がそれを提供している企業に雇用されています。では代わりに何を得たのでしょうか?401(k)型の計画を得たのですが、突然、退職計画の責任が企業から私たち個人に移されました。

私たちは手綱を握ったが、リスクも負った。そして、何百万もの私たちが40年以上にわたって自発的に投資するのがそんなに得意ではないことがわかった。何百万もの私たちは、市場リスクを管理するのがそんなに得意ではありません。そして実際の数字が物語を語っています。アメリカの世帯の半数が全く退職貯蓄を持っていません。ゼロです。401(k)もIRAも、一銭もありません。55歳から64歳の人々のうち、退職口座を持っている人々の中央値は104,000ドルです。今、104,000ドルはゼロよりも良い聞こえますが、年金としては約300ドルを生み出します。その額では生活できないことはお分かりでしょう。

貯蓄が減少し、年金が過去の遺物となり、401(k)プランが何百万人ものアメリカ人に失敗した中で、多くの近年の退職者は社会保障を退職計画として依存しています。しかし、問題はここにあります。

社会保障は元々、退職計画として考えられていたわけではありません。それだけではほとんど足りません。社会保障が導入された1935年から今日まで、状況は大きく変わりました。当時、21歳の男性が65歳まで生きる確率は50%でした。そのため、60歳で退職し、少し釣りをしたり、孫にキスをしたり、金の時計を受け取った後、5年以内に亡くなるでしょう。しかし、今日の状況は違います。もし50代後半で健康なら、あと20年または25年は余裕で生きることができます。もし貧困に苦しむことになったら、それは非常に長い時間です。

では、もし50歳や55歳や60歳でここに辿り着いたら、どうすればいいでしょうか?もしも22歳や32歳で、ここに辿り着きたくないと思っているのであれば、どうすればいいでしょうか?私自身の経験から学んだことをお伝えします。騎兵隊は来ません。大きな救援隊も、王子様も、大きな救済策もありません。アメリカで老いて貧しいだけではない未来を手にするためには、私たちは自分自身とお互いを救う必要があります。私は影から出てきて、ここで公然と立っています。そして、あなたにもそうして欲しいと思っています。簡単ではないとは言いません。

私は自分の物語を語ることに冒険しましたが、それは他の人々が自分の物語を語りやすくするためです。私たちが国の退職危機について持っている「らら」な会話を変え始めるためには、私たちの数の力によってのみ可能だと思います。私たちの多くがショックを受け、自分たちに何が起こったのかわからない中、私たちは草の根からの再建をしなければなりません。これは、耐久性のサークルと考えられる小さなグループです。これは、彼らが経験したことについて話し合い、リソースや情報を共有し、前進する方法を見つけ始めるために集まる小さなグループです。

私はこの基盤から、再び声を上げて警告を発することができると信じています。私たちは、この退職危機に対して、それにふさわしい緊急性を持って私たちの機関や政策立案者に強く働きかけ始める必要があります。その一方で、そして「その一方で」があります――私たちは支出を drasticalに削減するという地に身を低くする心構えを採用する必要があります。そして、私が言うのは単に自分の収入内で生活するということではありません。多くの人々が既にそれを実践しています。今必要とされているのは、より深く自問し、物によって定義される人生とは何かを問うことです。

私はそれを「小さくする」と呼んでいます。小さくするとは、自分が本当に満足し、安定感を得るために必要なものを見極めることです。私には、とても古びた車に乗る友人がいます。しかし、彼は15,000ドルを節約してフルートを買うことがあります。音楽こそが彼にとって本当に重要なものだからです。彼は小さくします。私も魔法のような考えを手放さなければなりませんでした――ただじっと我慢すれば、私のベルトを引き締めれば、すべてが元通りになるという考え方です。もしもう少し履歴書を送ったり、もう少しオンラインで求人を申し込んだり、もう少しネットワーキングイベントに参加すれば、きっと以前と同じような仕事が手に入るだろうという考え方です。きっとすべてが元通りになるだろうと。

真実は、私たちは戻ることはありません。そして、あなたも同じです。私たちが知っていた普通のことはもう過ぎ去りました。

この新しい場所で、私たちは自分がしたくないことをするよう求められるでしょう。私たちは自分の地位や才能、技術にふさわしくないと思われる仕事を引き受けるよう求められるでしょう。私は自分の玉座から降りる必要がありました。昨年、私の親友の一人が私に何か組織の仕事を手伝ってくれるかと尋ねてきました。私は彼女がシカゴでオバマ大統領が行ったような地域社会の組織化を指していると思いました。彼女は誰かのクローゼットの整理を指していました。私は「それはやりません」と言いました。彼女は「玉座から降りなさい。お金はみな同じ色です」と言いました。

新しい仕事と生活の新しい時代を導入する前衛チームの一部であることは簡単ではありません。最初は常に一番難しいです。最初はネットワークや経路やロールモデルがない時です。政策や進む方法が示される前の時です。私たちは地殻変動の真っ只中にいます。私たちは橋渡しを見つけ出す必要があります。橋渡しはその間に私たちがすることです。橋渡しは次に何が来るかを理解しようとしている間に私たちがすることです。橋渡しはまた、私たちの価値や価値が収入や肩書きや仕事に依存するという考えを手放すことでもあります。

橋渡しは、個人の経済的危機が襲った時の状況によっては、クレイジーに見えることもクールに見えることもあります。私の知り合いには博士号を持つ人がコンテナストアで働いたり、UberやLyftを運転したりしている人もいます。一方で、他の知り合いは他のベビーブーマーと協力して本当にクールな起業のベンチャーを行っています。橋渡しとは、私たちが過去のキャリアを構築したいという願望がないわけではないことを意味しません。私たちは望んでいます。橋渡しは、次に何が来るかを考えながらその間に私たちがすることです。

私も、やりたくないことを処理する際には、失敗ではなく戦略を考えることを学びました。そして、それは皆さんにも考慮していただきたいアプローチだと言いたいです。ですから、収入を確保するために兄弟の家に引っ越す必要があるなら、彼に連絡してください。住宅ローンや家賃を支払うのを助けるためにボーダーを迎え入れる必要があるなら、やってください。フードスタンプが必要なら、それを手に入れてください。AARPによると、資格を持つ高齢者のうち実際に受給しているのは3分の1だけです。次の一歩を踏み出すために必要なことをしてください。私たちが数百万人いることを知ってください。影から出てきてください。支出を減らし、小さくなり、失敗ではなく戦略を考え、玉座から降りて、苦しい時期を乗り越えるための橋渡しを見つけてください。

国として、私たちは疾病の診断、治療、管理に数十億ドルを投資し、長寿を達成しました。ただ長生きするだけでは十分ではありません。私たちは健康に長生きしたいと願っています。私たちは、それが実現するための身体的インフラへの投資はほとんどしていません。アメリカで老いることの意味について新しい考え方が必要です。そして、より控えめな収入で豊かな人生を生きる方法についてのガイダンスとアイデアが必要です。

ですから、私は変革のエージェントや社会起業家、アーティストや年長者、インパクト投資家に呼びかけます。私たちは、生活の尊厳、独立性、および幸福を支えるサービスや製品、インフラへの投資を想像するのを手伝ってくれる人々が必要です。私の旅は、恐れと恥から謙虚さと理解の場所に至りました。今、私は他の人々と盾を結びつけ、この戦いを戦う準備ができています。そして、あなたにも参加していただきたいと思います。ありがとう。

コメント

タイトルとURLをコピーしました