壊れた脚と共に生きる 強さと再生の物語

スポーツ

Former NFL quarterback Alex Smith almost died after a particularly rough tackle snapped his leg in 2018 — yet he was back on the field just two years later. In this inspiring talk, he shares his hard-won insights on overcoming fear, self-doubt and anxiety that could help anyone endure life’s challenges. (This talk contains graphic images.)

元NFLクォーターバックのアレックス・スミスは、2018年に特に厳しいタックルで足を骨折し、ほぼ死にかけました。

しかし、わずか2年後には再びフィールドに戻っていました。この感動的なトークでは、彼が恐怖、自己疑問、不安を乗り越えるために得た貴重な知識を共有しています。(このトークにはグラフィック画像が含まれています。)

タイトル NFLクォーターバックが挫折と自信喪失を乗り越える
An NFL quarterback on overcoming setbacks and self-doubt
スピーカー アレックス・スミス
アップロード 2021/11/05

「NFL クォーターバックが挫折と自信喪失を乗り越える(An NFL quarterback on overcoming setbacks and self-doubt)」の文字起こし

I wake up in a hospital bed and I’m surrounded by doctors. Everything is hazy. I’ve been in and out of consciousness for over a week. The doctors are telling me that I have a bad infection in my leg. They say that they’ve operated eight times already. They say that at one point my fever spiked and my immune system started attacking my body. I went septic and almost died. And then one of the doctors says this: “As we speak, flesh-eating bacteria is crawling up your leg. It’s getting closer to your vital organs every minute.” Good morning to you, too, doctor.

Let me back up. I’m a professional football player. I played quarterback. And two weeks earlier, two defenders, almost 500 pounds of muscle, crushed me at the same time. It sounds scary, but honestly, it’s pretty normal in my line of work. This time, though, my leg was bending where it shouldn’t. I had what they call a compound spiral fracture, which means that my leg was twisted and snapped diagonally, kind of like a corkscrew. And yes, it’s as painful as it sounds. I knew right there on the field that my season was done. What took me a little longer to figure out was that my life was about to change forever. Two years after that gruesome injury, I actually ran back out onto that field and led my team to the playoffs.

But what I want to talk about today isn’t some rousing comeback story where the crowd chants my name. I want to talk about the stuff that happens out of you. The stuff that athletes like me don’t want to discuss because we think it makes us look weak. I want to talk about fear, anxiety, and self-doubt. Because if I wanted to really fully recover from my injury, I didn’t just need to learn to walk and run again. I also needed something to run towards, something to live for.

After that first hazy conversation, in order to save my leg, the doctors actually removed part of my good thigh and reattached it to my busted-up leg. Now, they didn’t know if the muscle would take, so after the surgery, every hour, the doctors and nurses would come in, unwrap the wound, apply a gel and search for a heartbeat in the muscle. Every time I would make them put up this big white sheet to block my vision, because from what I could tell, it wasn’t a pretty sight. My leg was essentially a giant open wound. When the doctors and nurses were back there, my wife would be back there with them trying to cheer me up.

“It looks so good.”

“Babe, it’s so cool.”

There was no way she was going to get me to look down there. The truth is, I couldn’t bear to. Not because I couldn’t stomach it, but because I couldn’t accept what had happened to me. This went on for months. At the time I was wheelchair-bound, at home, my wife had to be there for me every second of the day, even helping me to go to the bathroom. I spent most of my days sitting propped up on the couch just thinking, was I ever going to walk again? Play catch with my kids again? Wrestle with them on the living room floor? All this for a stupid, meaningless game? To that point, my life had been so big, so full of possibility, but now it all seemed to be spiraling down, like that fracture in my leg. And I’ll be honest, this wasn’t the first time that my mind had been twisted up like that.

Let me tell you how my career started. I was this nothing college recruit. But in my last two years at school, I played pretty well and somehow catapulted up to be the first pick in the NFL draft. Over the course of a couple of months, I went from a guy most people hadn’t even heard of to the next great quarterback to the San Francisco 49ers. Joe Montana, Steve Young, me. I was a 20-year-old kid at the time, and I didn’t handle that pressure well. I got really, really anxious. Do I really belong here? How long until they find out I’m a fraud? The questions paralyzed me. I was absolutely terrified to make mistakes, and I was desperate for others’ validation. It followed me around 24/7. I got to where I couldn’t eat before games, I constantly felt nauseous. I’d be at the dinner table with my wife or some friends, and I just … I wasn’t there. To the outside world, I was playing this game I loved. I’d achieved what millions of kids grow up dreaming about. But in my mind, I was sinking like a stone. It stayed that way for the better part of five years. I’d have some success, but then I’d get injured or get a new coach. And the cycle would start over again.

And then I got two key pieces of advice. The first came in the form of a guy named Jim Harbaugh. He was my coach at the time. Now, what’s best about coach Harbaugh is he simply does not care what other people think about him. He couldn’t be more comfortable in his pleated khakis and tucked-in sweatshirt.

Now, coach Harbaugh used to tell the team the same thing right before we would take the field on game day. He would say, “Play as hard as you can, as fast as you can, for as long as you can. And don’t worry.” “Don’t worry.” It sounds simple, and it is, but I guess I didn’t really believe it was possible until it came from somebody that I trusted.

Around the same time, I had a teammate named Blake Costanzo. Blake was a linebacker who was a little nuts. Before games, he would run around the locker room and he would get in everybody’s face and he’d ask, “Are you going to live today? I’m going to live today, are you?” At first, I didn’t get it. But then he started to win me over. He was a guy who approached the game in the exact opposite way that I did. He was taking the challenge head on. He was fully present, right in the moment. Right in my face, just live.

These ideas were a counterweight to all my doubts. And wouldn’t you know it? I started playing better. Started having fun again, and we started winning. For the rest of my career, I would talk to a small group of teammates before games and tell them some form of the same thing. Just live. And even as I got traded twice and replaced by a couple of great young quarterbacks, I stuck with that ethic. But when my leg got infected, I completely lost that perspective. You might as well have taken that white sheet I was hiding behind and draped it over my face because I wasn’t really living. And once again, I needed somebody to help me snap out of it.

That spring, I started rehabbing at a military facility called the Center for the Intrepid. Because while my injury was unheard of for a football player, it was eerily similar to that of our wounded warriors. Basically, my leg exploded like I stepped on an IED. Before I got down there, I’d watched hours and hours of videos of these double and triple amputees and a lot of guys with injuries like mine who were going on to the Paralympics or rejoining the Army Rangers or the Navy SEALs. I was in awe of them. I wanted to be like them. But one of my PTs, Johnny Owens, made sure I knew right away it wasn’t going to be easy to get back on my feet. Literally.

The first day I was down there, I was doing a balance exercise on my good leg and he just shoved me right in the chest. “Come on, Alex.” Then he shoved me again. “Come on, you can do better than that.” Then he did something that changed my recovery completely. He handed me a football. You see, after spending years and years of my life with a football in my hands, I hadn’t touched one for months since my injury.

It was like reattaching a lost limb. He told me to throw from one knee. I zipped one to him. A better kind of spiral. From that point on, if you put a ball in my hands, I felt stronger. I did my exercises better. I can’t explain it, but I felt lighter. I felt alive. After that first visit, I felt like I had permission to dream again. I thought about getting back out onto the field. If I make it back, great, if I don’t, who cares, at least I was living for something. And that’s the mentality that carried me through my recovery. Through numerous setbacks, both physically and mentally, I eventually got cleared by the doctors. I actually made the roster. And then, 693 days after my injury, I got the call to put on my helmet and take my first snap in a game. Now, I wish I could tell you that the crowd went wild, but there was basically nobody there because of COVID.

And still, running onto that field, I had so many mixed emotions. What a rush. But to be honest, I was absolutely terrified. Practice was one thing, but a real game? Was my leg going to hold up? I found out on the third snap when this huge defender launched himself onto my back, I tried to take a few steps, but I went down. It’s still the most liberating feeling in my life, getting back up, knowing that I’m OK. I’m proud that I made it back out onto the field, but I’m more proud of what got me there. Not the physical journey, but the mental one.

I’ve learned that so much of the anxiety that holds us back in life, it’s self-inflicted. We make it worse on ourselves. And it’s OK if we need somebody to help us snap out of it. For me, that was my wife, a military guy, a maniac linebacker, or an eccentric coach. They taught me that I had to see my fears for what they are. And that’s why, looking back, I know that my recovery didn’t actually start when Johnny shoved me in the chest. First, I had to pull back that white sheet. For weeks and weeks, I’d been hearing my wife tell me how great it looked. She helped me get to that point. I was ready. And when I finally did it, it looked way worse than I had expected.

What I saw was not cool. It was grotesque. Mangled and deformed. All kinds of purple and blue and red. Fair warning, these pictures are a little graphic. But my leg went from this, the black is the dead tissue, to this. And this. And this. Before it could get rebuilt. But I saw my leg for what it was. And it was mine. These days, I’ve come a long way with this guy.

This thing that once represented everything I feared, everything I had lost, it’s probably the thing I’m most proud of in my life outside of my wife and kids. So, yeah, I guess she was right, it is pretty cool.

These scars, they’re not just a reminder of everything I’ve been through, but more so, everything that’s in front of me. They stare me in my face. Challenging me to be myself. To help others out of their own spirals when I can. Now, you might not have a leg that looks like this. But I’ll bet you’ve got some scars. And my hope for you is this. Look at them. Own them. They’re the best reminder you’ll ever have that there’s a whole world out there. And we’ve got a whole lot of living left to do. Thank you.

「NFL クォーターバックが挫折と自信喪失を乗り越える(An NFL quarterback on overcoming setbacks and self-doubt)」の和訳

病院のベッドで目を覚ますと、医者に囲まれていました。すべてがぼんやりしています。一週間以上、意識が遠のいていました。医者たちは私の足にひどい感染があると言っています。すでに8回手術をしたと言います。ある時点で熱が上がり、免疫系が体を攻撃し始めたと言います。敗血症になり、ほとんど死んでしまったとのことです。そして、その中の一人の医者がこう言いました。「現在、腐肉食性の細菌があなたの足を這っています。毎分、重要な臓器に近づいています」。おはようございます、と言ってもらえて。

ちょっと遡りましょう。私はプロのフットボール選手です。クォーターバックをしていました。2週間前、2人の守備選手、ほぼ500ポンドの筋肉が同時に私を押しつぶしました。怖い話ですが、正直なところ、私の仕事ではかなり普通です。でも、今回は違いました。私の足が曲がっていました。複雑な螺旋骨折、つまり、私の足が斜めにねじれて折れてしまった、まるでコークスクリューのように。そして、それは聞いての通り、とても痛かったです。フィールドの上で、私はシーズンが終わったとすぐに気づきました。その後、その恐ろしい怪我から2年後、私は実際にそのフィールドに戻って、チームをプレーオフに導いたのです。

でも、今日話したいのは、私の名前を叫ぶ観客の中での立ち直りの話ではありません。私が話したいのは、自分の内側で起こることです。私たち選手のような人たちが弱々しく見えるから話したくないことです。恐れ、不安、自己疑問について話したいのです。なぜなら、私が怪我から本当に完全に回復したかったなら、歩くこと、走ることを再学習するだけではなく、走る理由、生きる理由も必要だったからです。

最初のぼんやりとした会話の後、私の足を救うために、医師たちは実際に私の健全な太ももの一部を切り取り、壊れた足に取り付けました。しかし、筋肉が受け入れられるかどうかはわかりませんでした。手術後、毎時間、医師と看護師が入ってきて、傷をほどき、ゲルを塗り、筋肉の鼓動を探しました。私は毎回、大きな白いシーツを目隠しに使わせました。見たかったのですが、見たくありませんでした。私の足は基本的に巨大な開放創でした。医師と看護師がそこに戻っているとき、妻も一緒にいて、私を元気付けようとしていました。

「とてもいい感じよ」

「ねえ、すごいね」

彼女が私をそこを見せようとすることはありませんでした。その通り、私は見ようとすることができませんでした。それは、それが受け入れられなかったからではなく、私が起こったことを受け入れることができなかったからです。これは数か月続きました。その当時、私は車椅子に乗っており、家で、妻は私のために一日中そばにいなければなりませんでした。トイレに行くのを手伝ってもらうことさえも。私はほとんどの日を、ソファに腰かけて、ただ考えることに費やしました。私は再び歩けるのか?子供たちと再びキャッチボールをすることができるのか?リビングの床で彼らとレスリングをすることができるのか?すべてこれは、ばかげた、意味のないゲームのために?その時点で、私の人生はとても大きく、可能性に満ちていましたが、今、すべてがその足の骨折のように下降しているように思えました。正直に言うと、これは私の心がこんなにもねじれたのは初めてではありませんでした。

私のキャリアが始まった経緯をお話ししましょう。私は何の価値もない大学のリクルートでした。しかし、学校での最後の2年間、かなり良いプレーをして、どういうわけかNFLドラフトの第1ピックに抜擢されました。数か月の間に、ほとんどの人が聞いたこともないような存在から、サンフランシスコ49ersの次の偉大なクォーターバックになりました。ジョー・モンタナ、スティーブ・ヤング、そして私。当時の私は20歳の若者で、そのプレッシャーにうまく対処できませんでした。本当に本当に不安でした。私は本当にここに居るのでしょうか?私が詐欺師だと気づくのはいつですか?その疑問に私は動けなくなりました。私は間違いを犯すことを恐れ、他人からの承認を必死に求めました。それは24時間365日私を追いかけていました。試合前に食べられなくなり、絶えず吐き気を感じました。妻や友人と一緒に食卓に座っていても、私はただ…そこにいなかったのです。外の世界では、私は愛するこのゲームをプレーしていました。何百万もの子供が夢見ることを達成しました。しかし、私の心の中では、私は石のように沈んでいました。それは5年間ほど続きました。成功を収めることもありましたが、その後怪我をしたり、新しいコーチが入ったりすると、またサイクルが始まりました。

そして、私は2つの重要なアドバイスを受けました。最初のものはジム・ハーボーという人物からでした。彼はその当時私のコーチでした。ハーボー監督が最高なのは、彼が単純に他の人々が自分についてどう思っているかにまったく関心を持っていないことです。プリーツの入ったカーキパンツとインナーのスウェットシャツで、彼以上に快適な人はいません。

ハーボー監督は、試合当日のフィールドに向かう直前にチームに同じことをいつも言っていました。彼は言った。「できるだけ一生懸命、できるだけ早く、できるだけ長くプレーしてください。そして心配しないでください。」「心配しないでください。」それはシンプルなように聞こえますし、実際、そうなのですが、私が信頼する人からそれが出るまでは、本当に可能だとは思っていませんでした。

同じ頃、私のチームメイトにブレイク・コスタンゾという人がいました。ブレイクはちょっと風変わりなラインバッカーでした。試合前に、彼はロッカールームを走り回り、誰にでも近寄って、「今日は生きるのか?僕は生きるつもりだけど、君は?」と聞いていました。最初は理解できませんでした。しかし、彼は私を徐々に惹きつけ始めました。彼は私とまったく逆の方法でゲームに取り組んでいました。彼は挑戦を前に受け、その瞬間に完全に存在していました。私の顔の前で、ただ生きているのです。

これらの考えは、私のすべての疑念に対する対抗重量でした。そして、信じられないことに、私はプレーがうまくなりました。再び楽しむようになり、勝ち始めました。私のキャリアの残りの期間、私は試合前に少数のチームメイトと話し、同じようなことを伝えました。ただ生きる。そして、2度のトレードといくつかの優れた若手クォーターバックに交代されたとしても、その倫理を守りました。しかし、私の足が感染したとき、私は完全にその視点を失いました。私が隠れていた白いシーツを持ってきて、私の顔の上に掛けた方が良かったかもしれません、なぜなら私は本当に生きていなかったからです。再び、私は誰かの助けが必要でした。

その春、私は「センター・フォー・ジ・イントレピッド」という軍の施設でリハビリを始めました。なぜなら、私の怪我はフットボール選手にとって前代未聞のものでしたが、負傷した戦士たちのそれと不気味に似ていました。基本的に、私の足はIEDに踏みつけられたように爆発しました。そこに行く前に、私はこれらの両足や両腕を失った兵士たちや、私と同じような怪我を負った多くの人々がパラリンピックに参加したり、陸軍レンジャーや海軍シールズに復帰したりしている動画を何時間も見ていました。私は彼らに感心していました。私もあんな風になりたかったのです。しかし、私のPTの一人、ジョニー・オーウェンズは、私がすぐに立ち上がるのは簡単ではないことを知らせてくれました。文字通り。

最初の日、私は良い足でバランスの練習をしていましたが、彼は私の胸に突き飛ばしました。「さあ、アレックス。」その後、彼はもう一度私を突き飛ばしました。「さあ、もっと頑張れよ。」そして、彼は私の回復を完全に変えることをしました。彼は私にフットボールを手渡しました。私は何年もの間、人生のほとんどをフットボールを手にして過ごしてきましたが、怪我をしてから数か月間、一度も触れていませんでした。

それは失われた肢を取り戻したようなものでした。彼は私に片膝から投げるように言いました。私は彼にボールを投げました。より良い螺旋。その時点から、ボールを手にすると、私は強く感じました。私はエクササイズをより良く行いました。説明できませんが、私は軽く感じました。私は生きていると感じました。その最初の訪問の後、私は再び夢を見る許可を得たように感じました。フィールドに戻ることを考えました。もし戻れれば、素晴らしいことだし、戻れなくても、誰かに何かのために生きていたと思いました。そして、その考え方が私の回復を支えました。数々の肉体的、精神的な挫折を経て、最終的に医師にクリアランスをもらいました。実際にロースターに入りました。そして、私の怪我から693日後、試合で初めてのsnapを受けるという呼び出しを受けました。今、観客が熱狂したと言えるのが嬉しいのですが、COVIDのため誰もいませんでした。

それでも、フィールドに駆け出すと、私はさまざまな感情を抱きました。なんという感動。しかし、正直なところ、私は完全に怖かったです。練習は一つですが、本物の試合は別物です。私の足はもちろん大丈夫だろうか?3つ目のsnapで、巨大なディフェンダーが私の背中に飛びかかり、数歩歩こうとしましたが、倒れました。私の人生で最も解放感のある瞬間です。立ち上がり、自分が大丈夫だと知ること。フィールドに戻れたことは誇りに思いますが、そこに至ったことがもっと誇りに思います。肉体的な旅路ではなく、精神的な旅路です。

自分を後ろに引き戻す必要があることを学びました。何週間も、妻が私にどれだけ素晴らしいかを言っているのを聞いていました。彼女が私をその地点に導いてくれました。私は準備ができていました。そして、最終的にそれをやってみたとき、それは私が期待していたよりもずっと悪かったです。

私が見たものはクールなものではありませんでした。それはグロテスクでした。ねじれ、変形していました。あらゆる種類の紫、青、赤がありました。ここに警告です、これらの写真は少しグラフィックです。しかし、私の足は、これ、黒いのが壊死組織で、これ、これになる前に再構築されることになります。

しかし、私は自分の足が何であるかを見ました。それは私のものでした。今日、私はこの男と一緒にたくさんのことをしました。

かつては私が恐れたすべて、失ったすべてを表していたこのものは、妻と子供たち以外で人生で最も誇りに思うものかもしれません。だから、うん、彼女が正しかった、それはかなりクールです。

これらの傷跡は、私が経験してきたすべてを思い出させるだけでなく、さらに重要なのは、私の前にあるすべてです。それらは私の顔を見つめています。自分自身であるように私に挑戦しています。私ができるときは、他の人を自分自身のスパイラルから助けること。今、あなたの足がこれに似ていないかもしれません。しかし、あなたにも傷跡があるはずです。私の願いはこれです。それらを見てください。所有してください。それらは、外に広がる世界を思い出すための最高のリマインダーです。そして、私たちはまだたくさんの生活をする余地があります。

ありがとう。

コメント

タイトルとURLをコピーしました