競技と妊娠の間でアスリートが直面する隠れた恐怖

感情

Getting pregnant as a track and field athlete is often called the “kiss of death” — a sign your athletic career will soon end. Olympic champion, entrepreneur and proud mother Allyson Felix thinks it shouldn’t be that way. She tells the story of starting a family while fighting to change her former sponsor’s maternity policy — and paving the way for others to get greater protection and more support. Her message is a testament to the power of believing in and advocating for yourself. “You don’t have to be an Olympian to create change for yourself and others,” she says. “Each of us can bet on ourselves.”

陸上競技選手としての妊娠は、しばしば「死の接吻」と呼ばれ、陸上選手としてのキャリアが間もなく終わることを意味します。

オリンピックチャンピオンであり、起業家であり、誇り高き母親であるアリソン・フェリックスは、そうあるべきではないと考えています。

彼女は、元スポンサーの出産政策を変えるために闘いながら家族を築き、他の人たちがより強力な保護とより多くの支援を得られるように道を切り開いた物語を語ります。 彼女のメッセージは、自分を信じて主張する力の証です。 「自分自身や他人に変化をもたらすために、オリンピック選手になる必要はありません。私たち一人ひとりが自分自身に賭けることができます。」と彼女は言います。

タイトル An Olympic Champion’s Mindset for Overcoming Fear
恐怖を克服するためのオリンピックチャンピオンの心構え
スピーカー アリソン・フェリックス
アップロード 2022/04/21

「恐怖を克服するためのオリンピックチャンピオンの心構え(An Olympic Champion’s Mindset for Overcoming Fear)」の文字起こし

Sure, here’s the text with additional line breaks for improved readability and emphasis:

One of the scariest moments of my career started on a dark October morning in 2018. I’m a professional athlete, and my training schedule can be a lot. Six days a week, five hours a day. It’s intense.

Still, I never train that early. But on this day, a special type of fear brought me out at 4am before the sun. A fear that someone might discover a secret I’d been keeping. I was six months pregnant.

I was pregnant, and I was scared enough to train in the dark so that no one would see the life that was growing inside of me. I feared that if a fan or someone posted a photo, that my sponsor would immediately change their mind about wanting to work with me.

I feared that I would be forced to choose between motherhood and being a competitive athlete. I feared that the career I worked so hard to build would disappear just like that.

You think I’m exaggerating, right? How could a six-time Olympic champion, a 16-time world champion, a world record holder, possibly think that her career might be over by doing something as natural as having a baby?

Well, I’m not exaggerating. Getting pregnant in track and field has been called the “kiss of death.” And it comes with a lot of fear, just like for women in many professions.

I have been watching women that I respect and teammates of mine hide pregnancies since I was 19 years old. I’ve seen women have to make gut-wrenching decisions like deciding whether to recover their health or return to the sport.

Deciding whether to stay in the hospital with a sick child or go to a race so that they don’t receive a further pay reduction. I know what some of you might be thinking.

We all choose to get pregnant, right? If a sponsor doesn’t want to pay an athlete who’s not out on the track winning, that’s just part of the deal, right?

Well, I think the deal’s rigged. I think that companies want to have it both ways. And I think it’s time we change.

Sports companies love to tell women that they can have it all. They can do it all, they can be it all. We’ve all seen those inspirational ads.

I remember meeting with Nike leadership in 2010, and they told me about an initiative they sponsored called the Girl Effect. They promoted adolescent girls as the key to improving societies around the globe.

They said they believed in women and girls. And if I joined Nike, I could empower them. And I believed that.

But guess what? Girls come from somewhere. (Laughter) And women having babies during childrearing years is something that should be celebrated, not punished.

It should be a part of a normal, thriving, professional, athletic career. And women in all fields should never feel the need to hide a pregnancy, at 4am, in the dark, so that they won’t be photographed doing that thing that they love.

Thank you.

Remember how scared I told you I was when I was on the track that day? My mind was racing with the consequences of my decision to start a family. I had already been going through a difficult renegotiation period with Nike, and they were already offering me 70 percent less than what I had previously been making. And that was even before they knew about the baby.

Don’t even get me started with the ageism that is embedded in the capitalist dream. So when I told them about my pregnancy, I asked for a clause in the contract that specified they wouldn’t reduce my pay within 12 months of giving birth. They said yes.

But — you knew there was going to be a “but”, right? But it was only a yes for me. They weren’t ready to offer that same protection for all female athletes. They weren’t ready to set the precedent.

A couple of days later, my agent called me. Nike wanted to use me in a commercial for the Women’s World Cup. I couldn’t believe it. Nike wanted to use me to tell women and girls that they could do anything, even though the contract before me said the exact opposite.

I knew what I had to do. I knew I had to leave. I knew I was afraid, but I did it anyways. I wrote an op-ed in “The New York Times” calling out Nike’s maternity policy, and I wasn’t the only one.

My teammates and I, we helped turn the tide. Now, Nike offers eighteen months maternity protection and other sponsors —

And other sponsors like Altra, Nuun, Brooks and Burton, they came forward and they announced their new guarantees for female athletes who start families while being sponsored. Too late for me, but amazing for the women coming up now.

I didn’t resign with Nike, and I’m here to tell the tale. But more than that, I’m here to tell you that you can do it, too. Once you find the courage to believe in yourself, your own worth, your own values, it gets easier. It’s when you take a stand that you start to understand how to overcome that fear and how to make a change for yourself and sometimes for others.

I went on to find a new sponsor in the female-led, female-focused Athleta, and they helped me —

And they helped me challenge the International Olympic Committee’s childcare policy. Together, we raised 200,000 dollars for female athletes to be able to afford childcare when they go to races. Because women have babies, and these children don’t disappear when the races begin.

I made it back to the Olympics two years after giving birth. I won a gold and a bronze.

And I became the most decorated American track and field athlete of all time. All while my daughter was watching. Audience: Aww.

AF: I was running for so much more than for medals or for a time on the track. I was running as a representation for women and for mothers and for anybody who had been told that their story was over.

I remember crossing that line in Tokyo and having such a sense of fulfillment. I looked down at my feet and for the first time in my entire career, I wasn’t wearing Adidas, I wasn’t wearing Nike. I was wearing Saysh, the women’s footwear brand that I founded, designed for and by women, when I was left without a footwear sponsor. Because I was tired of not being valued or able to show up fully as myself.

I learned that my voice has power, and when I bet on myself, change is possible.

During the pandemic, we all saw what happens when that thin line between our professional and personal lives permanently blurs. We have seen women step back, give up, drop out, as having it all became doing it all, and doing it all became impossible.

We have got to stop forcing people to choose between parenting and doing the work that they love. And we’ve got to stop pretending that we’re not making those decisions because the results affect us all. Not just women, but men and our children, too. By creating the environment that we all live, work, love and raise our families in.

Isn’t it past time that we call out the hypocrisy and create a new normal? One with real generosity, humanity and truth at the center, not some misplaced sense of what business is or does.

We should say what we will tolerate. And as we all recover from the pandemic that has flattened us, let’s just not rebuild the same version of the broken system that we had before. But let’s learn and create something new.

Each one of us has a role to play. And you don’t have to be an Olympian to create change for yourself or for others. Everyone in this room can bet on themselves.

It will typically happen in moments of fear when you don’t see the path forward. In my own experience, it was a terrifying decision, but that will be your first clue. That feeling of being terrified is your invitation to create change.

You have to acknowledge those feelings, you have to brave them, and you have to fight to move forward. It won’t be easy. You will be afraid. Your voice will shake. But what I can absolutely promise you is that it will be worth it.

Thank you.

「恐怖を克服するためのオリンピックチャンピオンの心構え(An Olympic Champion’s Mindset for Overcoming Fear)」の和訳

こちらのテキストをより読みやすく、強調を加えて段落ごとに改行しました:

私のキャリアで最も怖かった瞬間の1つは、2018年の暗い10月の朝に始まりました。私はプロのアスリートで、トレーニングのスケジュールは相当です。週に6日、1日5時間。それは激しいものです。

しかし、私は決してそんなに早く練習しません。しかし、この日、特別な種類の恐怖が私を太陽の出る前の午前4時に連れ出しました。私が秘密にしていたことが誰かにバレるのではないかという恐怖。私は妊娠6か月でした。

私は妊娠しており、私の中で育つ命を誰にも見られないようにと、暗闇でトレーニングすることで怖かったのです。もしファンか誰かが写真を投稿したら、スポンサーが私と仕事をしたくなくなるだろうと恐れました。

私は母親であり、競技者であることの間で選択を迫られることを恐れました。私が一生懸命に築いてきたキャリアが、一瞬で消えてしまうかもしれないと恐れました。

私が大げさだと思うでしょう?6度のオリンピックチャンピオン、16回の世界チャンピオン、世界記録保持者が、出産という自然なことをすることでキャリアが終わるかもしれないと考えるなんて?

しかし、私は大げさではありません。陸上競技で妊娠することは「死のキス」と呼ばれています。そして、多くの職業における女性と同様に、それには多くの恐怖が伴います。

私は尊敬する女性やチームメイトが妊娠を隠しているのを19歳のときから見てきました。健康を回復するか競技に戻るかを決めるという、苦悩に満ちた決断をするのを見てきました。

病気の子供と一緒に入院するか、レースに出て報酬をさらに減らさないかを決めること。あなたの中にいる人の何人かが思っていることを知っています。

私たちは皆、妊娠を選択していますよね?スポンサーがトラックで勝利する選手にお金を払いたくないなら、それは取引の一部でしょう?

私は取引が不公平だと思います。企業は両方を望んでいます。そして、変える時が来たと思います。

スポーツ企業は女性に「何でもできる、何でもできる、何でも成し遂げることができる」と言いたがります。私たちは皆、そのようなインスピレーションを受ける広告を見たことがあります。

2010年にナイキのリーダーシップと会ったとき、彼らは私にナイキが後援するイニシアチブについて話しました。彼らは世界中の社会を改善するための鍵として10代の少女を推進しました。

彼らは女性と女の子を信じていました。そして、私がナイキに参加すれば、彼らを力付けることができると言った。そして、私はそれを信じました。

でも、結局どうなったか?女の子はどこから来るのですか?女性が育児期に出産することは、祝うべきことであり、罰するべきではありません。

それは普通で、繁栄している、プロフェッショナルで、競技的なキャリアの一部でなければなりません。すべての分野の女性は、自分が愛することをしている様子を撮影されないように、午前4時、暗闇で妊娠を隠さなければなりません。

ありがとう。

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