ギバーが成功する組織の作り方:30,000人調査で判明した秘訣

人間関係

In every workplace, there are three basic kinds of people: givers, takers and matchers. Organizational psychologist Adam Grant breaks down these personalities and offers simple strategies to promote a culture of generosity and keep self-serving employees from taking more than their share.

どの職場にも、ギバー、テイカー、マッチャーという 3 つの基本的なタイプの人々がいます。

組織心理学者のアダム・グラントは、これらの性格を分析し、寛大な文化を促進し、利己的な従業員が自分の取り分以上の仕事をしないようにするための簡単な戦略を提案します。

タイトル
Are you a giver or a taker?
あなたはギバーですか、それともテイカーですか?
スピーカー アダム・グラント
アップロード 2017/01/25

「あなたはギバーですか、それともテイカーですか?(Are you a giver or a taker?)」の文字起こし

I want you to look around the room for a minute and try to find the most paranoid person here —
And then I want you to point at that person for me.
OK, don’t actually do it.
But, as an organizational psychologist, I spend a lot of time in workplaces, and I find paranoia everywhere. Paranoia is caused by people that I call “takers.” Takers are self-serving in their interactions. It’s all about what can you do for me. The opposite is a giver. It’s somebody who approaches most interactions by asking, “What can I do for you?” I wanted to give you a chance to think about your own style. We all have moments of giving and taking. Your style is how you treat most of the people most of the time, your default. I have a short test you can take to figure out if you’re more of a giver or a taker, and you can take it right now.

This is the only thing I will say today that has no data behind it, but I am convinced the longer it takes for you to laugh at this cartoon, the more worried we should be that you’re a taker.
Of course, not all takers are narcissists. Some are just givers who got burned one too many times. Then there’s another kind of taker that we won’t be addressing today, and that’s called a psychopath.
I was curious, though, about how common these extremes are, and so I surveyed over 30,000 people across industries around the world’s cultures. And I found that most people are right in the middle between giving and taking. They choose this third style called “matching.” If you’re a matcher, you try to keep an even balance of give and take: quid pro quo — I’ll do something for you if you do something for me. And that seems like a safe way to live your life. But is it the most effective and productive way to live your life? The answer to that question is a very definitive … maybe.
I studied dozens of organizations, thousands of people. I had engineers measuring their productivity.
I looked at medical students’ grades — even salespeople’s revenue.
And, unexpectedly, the worst performers in each of these jobs were the givers. The engineers who got the least work done were the ones who did more favors than they got back. They were so busy doing other people’s jobs, they literally ran out of time and energy to get their own work completed. In medical school, the lowest grades belong to the students who agree most strongly with statements like, “I love helping others,” which suggests the doctor you ought to trust is the one who came to med school with no desire to help anybody.
And then in sales, too, the lowest revenue accrued in the most generous salespeople. I actually reached out to one of those salespeople who had a very high giver score. And I asked him, “Why do you suck at your job –” I didn’t ask it that way, but —
“What’s the cost of generosity in sales?” And he said, “Well, I just care so deeply about my customers that I would never sell them one of our crappy products.”
So just out of curiosity, how many of you self-identify more as givers than takers or matchers? Raise your hands. OK, it would have been more before we talked about these data. But actually, it turns out there’s a twist here, because givers are often sacrificing themselves, but they make their organizations better. We have a huge body of evidence — many, many studies looking at the frequency of giving behavior that exists in a team or an organization — and the more often people are helping and sharing their knowledge and providing mentoring, the better organizations do on every metric we can measure: higher profits, customer satisfaction, employee retention — even lower operating expenses.

「givers spend a lot of time trying to help other people and improve the team, and then, unfortunately, they suffer along the way. I want to talk about what it takes to build cultures where givers actually get to succeed.

So I wondered, then, if givers are the worst performers, who are the best performers? Let me start with the good news: it’s not the takers. Takers tend to rise quickly but also fall quickly in most jobs. And they fall at the hands of matchers. If you’re a matcher, you believe in “An eye for an eye” — a just world. And so when you meet a taker, you feel like it’s your mission in life to just punish the hell out of that person.
And that way justice gets served. Well, most people are matchers.

And that means if you’re a taker, it tends to catch up with you eventually; what goes around will come around. And so the logical conclusion is: it must be the matchers who are the best performers. But they’re not. In every job, in every organization I’ve ever studied, the best results belong to the givers again. Take a look at some data I gathered from hundreds of salespeople, tracking their revenue. What you can see is that the givers go to both extremes. They make up the majority of people who bring in the lowest revenue, but also the highest revenue. The same patterns were true for engineers’ productivity and medical students’ grades. Givers are overrepresented at the bottom and at the top of every success metric that I can track.

Which raises the question: How do we create a world where more of these givers get to excel? I want to talk about how to do that, not just in businesses, but also in nonprofits, schools — even governments. Are you ready?

I was going to do it anyway, but I appreciate the enthusiasm.

The first thing that’s really critical is to recognize that givers are your most valuable people, but if they’re not careful, they burn out. So you have to protect the givers in your midst. And I learned a great lesson about this from Fortune’s best networker. It’s the guy, not the cat.
His name is Adam Rifkin. He’s a very successful serial entrepreneur who spends a huge amount of his time helping other people. And his secret weapon is the five-minute favor. Adam said, “You don’t have to be Mother Teresa or Gandhi to be a giver. You just have to find small ways to add large value to other people’s lives.” That could be as simple as making an introduction between two people who could benefit from knowing each other. It could be sharing your knowledge or giving a little bit of feedback. Or It might be even something as basic as saying, “You know, I’m going to try and figure out if I can recognize somebody whose work has gone unnoticed.” And those five-minute favors are really critical to helping givers set boundaries and protect themselves.

The second thing that matters if you want to build a culture where givers succeed is you actually need a culture where help-seeking is the norm; where people ask a lot. This may hit a little too close to home for some of you.
What you see with successful givers is they recognize that it’s OK to be a receiver, too. If you run an organization, we can actually make this easier. We can make it easier for people to ask for help. A couple colleagues and I studied hospitals. We found that on certain floors, nurses did a lot of help-seeking, and on other floors, they did very little of it. The factor that stood out on the floors where help-seeking was common, where it was the norm, was there was just one nurse whose sole job it was to help other nurses on the unit. When that role was available, nurses said, “It’s not embarrassing, it’s not vulnerable to ask for help — it’s actually encouraged.”」

Certainly! Here’s the text with additional line breaks:

“Help-seeking isn’t important just for protecting the success and the well-being of givers. It’s also critical to getting more people to act like givers, because the data say that somewhere between 75 and 90 percent of all giving in organizations starts with a request. But a lot of people don’t ask. They don’t want to look incompetent, they don’t know where to turn, they don’t want to burden others. Yet if nobody ever asks for help, you have a lot of frustrated givers in your organization who would love to step up and contribute, if they only knew who could benefit and how.

But I think the most important thing, if you want to build a culture of successful givers, is to be thoughtful about who you let onto your team. I figured, you want a culture of productive generosity, you should hire a bunch of givers. But I was surprised to discover, actually, that that was not right — that the negative impact of a taker on a culture is usually double to triple the positive impact of a giver. Think about it this way: one bad apple can spoil a barrel, but one good egg just does not make a dozen. I don’t know what that means —
But I hope you do. No — let even one taker into a team, and you will see that the givers will stop helping. They’ll say, “I’m surrounded by a bunch of snakes and sharks. Why should I contribute?” Whereas if you let one giver into a team, you don’t get an explosion of generosity. More often, people are like, “Great! That person can do all our work.” So, effective hiring and screening and team building is not about bringing in the givers; it’s about weeding out the takers. If you can do that well, you’ll be left with givers and matchers. The givers will be generous because they don’t have to worry about the consequences. And the beauty of the matchers is that they follow the norm.

So how do you catch a taker before it’s too late? We’re actually pretty bad at figuring out who’s a taker, especially on first impressions. There’s a personality trait that throws us off. It’s called agreeableness, one the major dimensions of personality across cultures. Agreeable people are warm and friendly, they’re nice, they’re polite. You find a lot of them in Canada —
Where there was actually a national contest to come up with a new Canadian slogan and fill in the blank, “As Canadian as …” I thought the winning entry was going to be, “As Canadian as maple syrup,” or, “… ice hockey.” But no, Canadians voted for their new national slogan to be — I kid you not — “As Canadian as possible under the circumstances.”
Now for those of you who are highly agreeable, or maybe slightly Canadian, you get this right away. How could I ever say I’m any one thing when I’m constantly adapting to try to please other people? Disagreeable people do less of it. They’re more critical, skeptical, challenging, and far more likely than their peers to go to law school.
That’s not a joke, that’s actually an empirical fact.
So I always assumed that agreeable people were givers and disagreeable people were takers. But then I gathered the data, and I was stunned to find no correlation between those traits, because it turns out that agreeableness-disagreeableness is your outer veneer: How pleasant is it to interact with you? Whereas giving and taking are more of your inner motives: What are your values? What are your intentions toward others? If you really want to judge people accurately, you have to get to the moment every consultant in the room is waiting for, and draw a two-by-two.
The agreeable givers are easy to spot: they say yes to everything. The disagreeable takers are also recognized quickly, although you might call them by a slightly different name.
We forget about the other two combinations. There are disagreeable givers in our organizations. There are people who are gruff and tough on the surface but underneath have others’ best interests at heart. Or as an engineer put it, “Oh, disagreeable givers — like somebody with a bad user interface but a great operating system.”
If that helps you.

Disagreeable givers are the most undervalued people in our organizations, because they’re the ones who give the critical feedback that no one wants to hear but everyone needs to hear. We need to do a much better job valuing these people as opposed to writing them off early, and saying, “Eh, kind of prickly, must be a selfish taker.” The other combination we forget about is the deadly one — the agreeable taker, also known as the faker. This is the person who’s nice to your face, and then will stab you right in the back.
And my favorite way to catch these people in the interview process is to ask the question, “Can you give me the names of four people whose careers you have fundamentally improved?” The takers will give you four names, and they will all be more influential than them, because takers are great at kissing up and then kicking down. Givers are more likely to name people who are below them in a hierarchy, who don’t have as much power, who can do them no good. And let’s face it, you all know you can learn a lot about character by watching how someone treats their restaurant server or their Uber driver.

So if we do all this well, if we can weed takers out of organizations, if we can make it safe to ask for help, if we can protect givers from burnout and make it OK for them to be ambitious in pursuing their own goals as well as trying to help other people, we can actually change the way that people define success. Instead of saying it’s all about winning a competition, people will realize success is really more about contribution. I believe that the most meaningful way to succeed is to help other people succeed. And if we can spread that belief, we can actually turn paranoia upside down. There’s a name for that. It’s called “pronoia.” Pronoia is the delusional belief that other people are plotting your well-being.
That they’re going around behind your back and saying exceptionally glowing things about you. The great thing about a culture of givers is that’s not a delusion — it’s reality.

I want to live in a world where givers succeed, and I hope you will help me create that world. Thank you.

「あなたはギバーですか、それともテイカーですか?(Are you a giver or a taker?)」の和訳

部屋を見回して、ここで一番偏執的な人を探してみてください──
そして、その人を指さしてください。
わかりました、実際にはしないでください。
しかし、私は組織心理学者として、職場で多くの時間を過ごしていますが、どこにでも偏執が見られます。偏執は、私が「取り入り」と呼ぶ人々によって引き起こされます。取り入りは、自己中心的であり、他者との関わり方は自己利益のためだけです。それは、あなたが私に何ができるか、ということばかりです。対極には、与える人がいます。与える人は、ほとんどの相互作用を「私に何ができるか」と尋ねることでアプローチします。あなた自身のスタイルについて考える機会を与えたかったのです。私たちは皆、与えることと受け取ることの瞬間を持っています。あなたのスタイルとは、ほとんどの人に対して、ほとんどの時間に対して、デフォルトでどのように接するかです。あなたが与える人か取り入る人かを知るための短いテストがあります。今すぐ受けることができます。

これは今日述べるデータがない唯一のことですが、私は確信しています。この漫画に笑いが出るまでの時間が長いほど、あなたが取り入りである可能性が高いということを心配すべきです。
もちろん、すべての取り入りがナルシストではありません。中には、何度も傷ついた与える人もいます。そして、今日は取り上げないもう一つのタイプの取り入りがあります。それは、サイコパスと呼ばれるものです。

しかし、これらの極端なスタイルがどれほど一般的なのかについては興味がありましたので、世界のさまざまな産業で30,000人以上に調査を行いました。そして、ほとんどの人々が、与えることと受け取ることの中間に位置していることがわかりました。彼らは「マッチング」と呼ばれるこの第3のスタイルを選択します。マッチャーは、与えることと受け取ることのバランスを保とうとします。与えた分を返してもらうことです。そして、これは生活する上で安全な方法のように思えます。しかし、それが最も効果的で生産的な生き方なのでしょうか?その質問への答えは、非常に明確な……かもしれません。

私は数十の組織、何千もの人々を研究しました。エンジニアが生産性を測定するのを見たことがあります。医学生の成績も見ました。さらにはセールスパーソンの収益も。そして、予想外のことに、これらの仕事の最低のパフォーマンスを示したのは与える人たちでした。最も仕事をしなかったエンジニアは、他の人々の仕事をこなすのに忙しく、自分の仕事を終わらせるのに時間とエネルギーがなくなってしまいました。医学校では、最も低い成績は、「他人を助けるのが好き」という発言に最も強く同意した学生に与えられました。これは、信頼すべき医者は、誰も助けたいと思わないで医学校に来た人物だということを示唆しています。そして、セールスでも、最も寛容なセールスパーソンほど最低の収益を得ました。実際、非常に高い与えるスコアを持つセールスパーソンの1人に連絡を取りました。そして、彼に尋ねました。「なぜあなたの仕事がうまくいかないのですか?」「売り手の寛容さのコストは何ですか?」と。彼は言いました。「私はただ顧客を深く気にしているので、彼らに私たちのクソみたいな製品を売りません。」

興味本位ですが、与える人たちはしばしば自己犠牲をしていますが、彼らは自分の組織を良くしています。私たちは非常に多くの証拠を持っています。チームや組織内で与える行動の頻度を調べた多くの研究があります。人々が助け合い、知識を共有し、メンタリングを提供するほど、組織はあらゆる指標でより良い結果を出します。高い利益、顧客満足度、従業員の定着率、さらには低い運営費用さえもです。

「与える人たちは他人を助け、チームを改善しようとするため、残念ながら道中で苦しむことがあります。与える人が実際に成功する文化を構築するためには、何が必要なのかについて話したいと思います。

それでは、与える人が最悪のパフォーマーであるなら、最高のパフォーマーは誰なのかと考えました。まず良いニュースから始めましょう:それは取りたてた人たちではありません。取りたてた人たちは、多くの仕事で速く昇進しますが、同様に速く落ちる傾向があります。そして、彼らはマッチャーの手によって転落します。マッチャーの場合、彼らは「目には目を」信じる人たちです。そして、取りたてた人に出会うと、その人を地獄のように罰することが人生の使命だと感じるのです。
そして、そのようにして正義が成されるのです。まあ、ほとんどの人々はマッチャーです。

これは、もし取りたてた人であれば、最終的には追いつかれる傾向があるということです。巡り巡って返ってくるものです。そのため、論理的な結論は次のとおりです:最も優れたパフォーマーはおそらくマッチャーなのでしょう。しかし、そうではありません。私がこれまで研究したすべての仕事、すべての組織で、最良の結果は再び与える人たちのものです。何百人ものセールスパーソンから収益を追跡するデータを見てみましょう。見ることができるのは、与える人たちが両極端に行くということです。収益が最も低い人の大多数を占めるだけでなく、最も高い収益も生み出します。エンジニアの生産性や医学生の成績についても同様のパターンが真実でした。与える人たちは、私が追跡できるあらゆる成功指標の底と頂点に過剰に出現します。

これが問われる問いです:より多くのこれらの与える人が優れる世界をどのように作り出すのでしょうか?それについて話したいと思います。ビジネスだけでなく、非営利団体、学校、政府でもです。準備はいいですか?

私はとにかくやるつもりでしたが、熱意を感謝します。」

まず、本当に重要なことは、ギバーが最も貴重な人材であることを認識することですが、彼らが慎重でないと、彼らは燃え尽きてしまいます。だからこそ、あなたの中にいるギバーを守らなければなりません。そして、私はフォーチュンのベストネットワーカーからこのことを素晴らしい教訓として学びました。それは、猫ではなく、その男性です。
彼の名前はアダム・リフキンです。彼は非常に成功したシリアル起業家であり、自分の時間の多くを他の人々を助けることに費やしています。彼の秘密兵器は「5分の好意」です。アダムは言いました。「あなたがギバーであるためには、マザーテレサやガンジーである必要はありません。他の人々の人生に大きな価値を提供する小さな方法を見つけるだけです。」それは、お互いに知り合うことで利益を得ることができる2人の人の紹介をすることだったり、知識を共有したり、少しのフィードバックを与えたりすることかもしれません。また、作業が見過ごされている誰かを見つけ出そうとすることです。そして、これらの5分の好意は、ギバーが境界を設定し、自分自身を守るのに本当に重要です。

もしギバーが成功する文化を築きたいのであれば、重要な2つ目のことは、実際には助けを求めることが当たり前の文化が必要です。人々がたくさん質問する文化です。これは、あなたの中の一部の人には少し辛口かもしれません。
成功したギバーが見るのは、受け手であることも大丈夫だと認識していることです。もし組織を運営しているのであれば、これを実現することができます。人々が助けを求めやすくなるようにすることができます。私たちと数人の同僚は病院を研究しました。特定のフロアでは、看護師がたくさんの助けを求め、他のフロアではほとんど求めないことがわかりました。助けを求めることが一般的で、それが当たり前のフロアでは、単にひとりの看護師がユニット内の他の看護師を手伝う役割があったのです。その役割があると、看護師は「助けを求めることは恥ずかしいことではなく、脆弱なことでもありません。実際には推奨されています。」

助けを求めることは、ギバーの成功と幸福を守るためだけでなく、他の人々にもギバーのように行動してもらうためにも重要です。なぜなら、データによると、組織内のすべての寄付の75%から90%がリクエストから始まるからです。しかし、多くの人々が尋ねません。彼らは無能に見えたくない、どこに相談すればいいのかわからない、他人に負担をかけたくない、と思っています。しかし、誰も助けを求めなければ、組織内には、誰が利益を得られるか、どのように貢献できるかを知っているだけで、貢献したいと考えているギバーがたくさんいます。

しかし、成功したギバーの文化を築きたいのであれば、最も重要なことは、チームに参加させる人を慎重に選ぶことです。生産的な寛大さの文化を望むのであれば、多くのギバーを雇うべきだと思いましたが、実際には、それが正しいとは思わないことが驚きでした。文化におけるテイカーの負の影響は、通常、ギバーの正の影響の2倍から3倍です。考えてみてください:1つの腐ったりんごが一桶を台無しにすることができますが、1つの良い卵だけでは12個にはなりません。私はそれが何を意味するかは分かりませんが–
でも、あなたが理解してくれることを願っています。いや、一人のテイカーをチームに入れるだけで、ギバーが助けることをやめるのを見るでしょう。「私は蛇とサメに囲まれています。なぜ貢献しなければならないのでしょうか?」一方、一人のギバーをチームに入れれば、寛大さが爆発するわけではありません。むしろ、人々は「素晴らしい!その人が私たちの仕事を全てやってくれる」と言うことがよくあります。ですので、効果的な採用やスクリーニング、チームビルディングは、ギバーを連れてくることではなく、テイカーを排除することです。それがうまくできれば、ギバーとマッチャーだけが残ります。ギバーは結果を心配する必要がないので、寛大になります。そして、マッチャーの美しいところは、彼らが規範に従うことです。

では、どのようにしてテイカーを間に合わせることができるのでしょうか?実際には、テイカーを見分けるのはかなり難しいです、特に最初の印象では。私たちを惑わせる性格特性があります。それは「協調性」と呼ばれ、文化を超えた主要な性格の次元の1つです。協調的な人々は暖かくフレンドリーで、親切で礼儀正しいです。カナダでは多くの人々がそれに当てはまります──
実際、新しいカナダのスローガンを考え、空欄を埋める全国大会が行われたとき、私は勝者のエントリーは「カナダ的にはメープルシロップのように」あるいは「アイスホッケーのように」と思っていました。しかし、カナダ人は新しい国民的スローガンを投票で選びました──冗談ではありません──「状況の中で可能な限りカナダ的に」。
あなたが高い協調性を持っている人、あるいは少しカナダ的な人も、これをすぐに理解するでしょう。私が常に他の人を喜ばせようとして適応しているのに、どうして私が1つのことを言えると思えるでしょうか?非協調的な人々はそれをあまりしません。彼らはより批判的で懐疑的であり、挑戦的であり、その仲間よりも法学部に進む可能性がはるかに高いです。
それは冗談ではなく、実際に経験的な事実です。

私はいつも協調的な人々がギバーであり、非協調的な人々がテイカーであると思っていました。しかし、データを集めてみると、これらの特性の間に相関関係がないことに驚愕しました。なぜなら、協調性と非協調性はあなたの外見的な表層であり、あなたとの相互作用はどれだけ楽しいかです。一方、与えることと取ることは、あなたの内的な動機であり、あなたの価値観は何か?他者に対するあなたの意図は何か?本当に人々を正確に判断したいのであれば、部屋のすべてのコンサルタントが待っている瞬間に到達し、2×2のグリッドを描く必要があります。

協調的なギバーは簡単に見つけられます:彼らはすべてに「はい」と言います。非協調的なテイカーもすぐに認識されますが、彼らを少し異なる名前で呼ぶかもしれません。

私たちは他の2つの組み合わせを忘れてしまいます。組織内には非協調的なギバーもいます。表面上は厳格で厳しい人々もいますが、その下には他者の最善の利益があります。あるエンジニアが言ったように、「ああ、非協調的なギバー──まるでユーザーインターフェースが悪いが、優れたオペレーティングシステムを持っている人のようです。それがあなたを助けるのであれば。」

組織内で最も過小評価されているのは、非協調的なギバーです。なぜなら、彼らこそが誰もが聞きたくないが、誰もが聞く必要がある重要なフィードバックを提供する人々だからです。私たちは、これらの人々を早々に見切って、「まあ、ちょっと扱いにくいな、自己中心的なテイカーだろう」と言うのではなく、これらの人々をより評価するためにはもっと良い仕事をしなければなりません。もう1つ忘れている組み合わせは致命的なものです──協調的なテイカー、またの名をフェイカーとも呼ばれるものです。これは、表向きは親切ですが、実際には背後であなたを刺す人のことです。

そして、面接のプロセスでこれらの人々を捕まえる私のお気に入りの方法は、質問をすることです。「あなたが基本的にキャリアを向上させた4人の人々の名前を教えていただけますか?」テイカーは4人の名前を教えてくれますが、彼らは全員が彼らよりも影響力があります。なぜなら、テイカーは上司に取り入ることが得意で、その後は下の立場の人々を蹴落とすことが得意だからです。ギバーは、階層の下にいる人々、権力を持っていない人々、自分に何の利益ももたらせない人々の名前を挙げる可能性がより高いです。そして、正直に言って、誰かがレストランのサーバーやUberのドライバーをどのように扱うかを見て、その人の性格について多くのことを学ぶことができると皆さんが知っているでしょう。

もしこれらのことをうまく実行できれば、組織から利己的な人々を取り除くことができ、助けを求めることが安全になり、ギバー(与える人)を燃え尽きから守り、彼らが自分自身の目標を追求することと他の人々を助けることが許されるようになれば、人々が成功を定義する方法を実際に変えることができます。競争に勝つことだけが成功ではなく、人々は成功は本当は貢献についてだと気づくでしょう。私は最も意味のある成功は他の人々を成功させることだと信じています。そして、その信念を広めることができれば、実際には逆転の発想を生み出すことができます。それは「プロノイア」と呼ばれています。プロノイアは他の人々があなたの幸福を企てているという妄想的な信念です。

あなたの背後であなたについて非常に素晴らしいことを言っていると信じる、という幻想です。ギバーの文化の素晴らしいところは、それが幻想ではなく現実であるということです。

私はギバーが成功する世界に住みたいと思っています。そして、あなたがその世界を創造する手助けをしてくれることを願っています。ありがとう。

コメント

タイトルとURLをコピーしました