自動焦点メガネの未来:老眼の悩みを解決する技術

健康

As you age, you gradually lose the ability to refocus your eyes — a phenomenon as old as humanity itself — leading to a reliance on bifocals, contacts and procedures like LASIK surgery. Electrical engineer Nitish Padmanaban offers a glimpse of cutting-edge tech that’s truly a sight for sore eyes: dynamic, autofocusing lenses that track your sight and adjust to what you see, both near and far.

年齢を重ねると、目の焦点を再び合わせる能力が徐々に失われ、これは人類の歴史と同じくらい古い現象であり、遠近両用眼鏡やコンタクト、レーシック手術などの処置に依存することになります。 電気技師のニティッシュ・パドマナバン氏が、目の疲れを癒す最先端のテクノロジーを垣間見せます。それは、視界を追跡し、近くと遠くの両方で見えるものに合わせて調整するダイナミックな自動焦点レンズです。

タイトル
Autofocusing reading glasses of the future
未来のオートフォーカス老眼鏡
スピーカー ニティッシュ・パドマナバン
アップロード 2020/06/19

「未来のオートフォーカス老眼鏡(Autofocusing reading glasses of the future)」の文字起こし

Every single one of us will lose or has already lost something we rely on every single day. I am of course talking about our keys. (Laughter) Just kidding. What I actually want to talk about is one of our most important senses: vision. Every single day we each lose a little bit of our ability to refocus our eyes until we can’t refocus at all. We call this condition presbyopia, and it affects two billion people worldwide. That’s right, I said billion. If you haven’t heard of presbyopia, and you’re wondering, “Where are these two billion people?” here’s a hint before I get into the details. It’s the reason why people wear reading glasses or bifocal lenses.

I’ll get started by describing the loss in refocusing ability leading up to presbyopia. As a newborn, you would have been able to focus as close as six and a half centimeters, if you wished to. By your mid-20s, you have about half of that focusing power left. 10 centimeters or so, but close enough that you never notice the difference. By your late 40s though, the closest you can focus is about 25 centimeters, maybe even farther. Losses in focusing ability beyond this point start affecting near-vision tasks like reading, and by the time you reach age 60, nothing within a meter radius of you is clear.

Right now some of you are probably thinking, that sounds bad but he means you in a figurative sense, only for the people that actually end up with presbyopia. But no, when I say you, I literally mean that every single one of you will someday be presbyopic if you aren’t already. That sounds a bit troubling. I want to remind you that presbyopia has been with us for all of human history and we’ve done a lot of different things to try and fix it.

So to start, let’s imagine that you’re sitting at a desk, reading. If you were presbyopic, it might look a little something like this. Anything close by, like the magazine, will be blurry. Moving on to solutions. First, reading glasses. These have lenses with a single focal power tuned so that near objects come into focus. But far objects necessarily go out of focus, meaning you have to constantly switch back and forth between wearing and not wearing them.

To solve this problem Benjamin Franklin invented what he called “double spectacles.” Today we call those bifocals, and what they let him do was see far when he looked up and see near when he looked down. Today we also have progressive lenses which get rid of the line by smoothly varying the focal power from top to bottom. The downside to both of these is that you lose field of vision at any given distance, because it gets split up from top to bottom like this.

To see why that’s a problem, imagine that you’re climbing down a ladder or stairs. You look down to get your footing but it’s blurry. Why would it be blurry? Well, you look down and that’s the near part of the lens, but the next step was past arm’s reach, which for your eyes counts as far.

The next solution I want to point out is a little less common but comes up in contact lenses or LASIK surgeries, and it’s called monovision. It works by setting up the dominant eye to focus far and the other eye to focus near. Your brain does the work of intelligently putting together the sharpest parts from each eye’s view, but the two eyes see slightly different things, and that makes it harder to judge distances binocularly.

So where does that leave us? We’ve come up with a lot of solutions but none of them quite restore natural refocusing. None of them let you just look at something and expect it to be in focus. But why? Well, to explain that we’ll want to take a look at the anatomy of the human eye.

The part of the eye that allows us to refocus to different distances is called the crystalline lens. There are muscles surrounding the lens that can deform it into different shapes, which in turn changes its focusing power. What happens when someone becomes presbyopic? It turns out that the crystalline lens stiffens to the point that it doesn’t really change shape anymore.

Now, thinking back on all the solutions I listed earlier, we can see that they all have something in common with the others but not with our eyes, and that is that they’re all static. It’s like the optical equivalent of a pirate with a peg leg. What is the optical equivalent of a modern prosthetic leg? The last several decades have seen the creation and rapid development of what are called “focus-tunable lenses.”

There are several different types. Mechanically-shifted Alvarez lenses, deformable liquid lenses, and electronically-switched, liquid crystal lenses. Now these have their own trade-offs, but what they don’t skimp on is the visual experience. Full-field-of-view vision that can be sharp at any desired distance.

OK, great. The lenses we need already exist. Problem solved, right? Not so fast. Focus-tunable lenses add a bit of complexity to the equation. The lenses don’t have any way of knowing what distance they should be focused to. What we need are glasses that, when you’re looking far, far objects are sharp, and when you look near, near objects come into focus in your field of view, without you having to think about it.

What I’ve worked on these last few years at Stanford is building that exact intelligence around the lenses. Our prototype borrows technology from virtual and augmented reality systems to estimate focusing distance. We have an eye tracker that can tell what direction our eyes are focused in. Using two of these, we can triangulate your gaze direction to get a focus estimate. Just in case though, to increase reliability, we also added a distance sensor. The sensor is a camera that looks out at the world and reports distances to objects. We can again use your gaze direction to get a distance estimate for a second time. We then fuse those two distance estimates and update the focus-tunable lens power accordingly.

The next step for us was to test our device on actual people. So we recruited about 100 presbyopes and had them test our device while we measured their performance. What we saw convinced us right then that autofocals were the future. Our participants could see more clearly, they could focus more quickly and they thought it was an easier and better focusing experience than their current correction.

To put it simply, when it comes to vision, autofocals don’t compromise like static corrections in use today do. But I don’t want to get ahead of myself. There’s a lot of work for my colleagues and me left to do. For example, our glasses are a bit — (Laughter) bulky, maybe? And one reason for this is that we used bulkier components that are often intended for research use or industrial use. Another is that we need to strap everything down because current eye-tracking algorithms don’t have the robustness that we need.

So moving forward, as we move from a research setting into a start-up, we plan to make future autofocals eventually look a little bit more like normal glasses. For this to happen, we’ll need to significantly improve the robustness of our eye-tracking solution. We’ll also need to incorporate smaller and more efficient electronics and lenses.

That said, even with our current prototype, we’ve shown that today’s focus-tunable lens technology is capable of outperforming traditional forms of static correction. So it’s only a matter of time. It’s pretty clear that in the near future, instead of worrying about which pair of glasses to use and when, we’ll be able to just focus on the important things. Thank you.

「未来のオートフォーカス老眼鏡(Autofocusing reading glasses of the future)」の和訳

私たち全員が、毎日依存している何かを失ったり、すでに失っています。もちろん、私は鍵のことを話しているわけではありません。冗談です。実際に話したいのは、私たちの最も重要な感覚の1つ、視覚です。毎日、私たちは一日中、目を合わせる能力の一部を失っていきます。最終的には、再び焦点を合わせることができなくなります。この状態を老視と呼び、世界中で20億人に影響します。そうです、20億人です。老視を聞いたことがなく、「では、これらの20億人はどこにいるのか?」と思っているなら、詳細に入る前にヒントを与えましょう。それは、人々が老眼鏡や遠近両用レンズをかける理由です。

老視に至るまでの目の再焦点能力の低下について説明します。新生児の頃、もし望むなら、焦点を6.5センチまで合わせることができました。20代半ばになると、その焦点能力は半分ほどになります。約10センチほどですが、その差には気づかないほど近い距離まで焦点を合わせることができます。しかし40代後半になると、焦点を合わせられる最短距離は約25センチで、さらに遠くになるかもしれません。この時点以降の焦点能力の低下は、読書などの近距離ビジョンのタスクに影響し始め、60歳になると、自分の周りの1メートル以内のものは何もはっきりと見えなくなります。

今、あなたの中には、それは悪いように聞こえるかもしれませんが、彼は比喩的な意味で言っていると考えている人もいるかもしれませんが、いいえ、私が「あなた」と言うとき、文字通り、もしまだ老視になっていないならば、将来的には誰もが老視になるという意味です。それはちょっと心配かもしれませんね。老視は人類の歴史を通じて存在しており、私たちはそれを修正するためにさまざまな方法を試みてきました。

さて、始めに、机に座って本を読んでいると想像してみましょう。もし老視だったら、こんな感じになるかもしれません。雑誌などの近くのものはぼやけて見えます。次に、解決策を考えてみましょう。まず、老眼鏡です。これには、近距離の物が焦点になるように調整された単一の焦点電力を持つレンズがあります。しかし、遠くの物は必然的にぼやけてしまい、つまり、老眼鏡をかけるかかけないかを常に行ったり来たりしなければなりません。

この問題を解決するために、ベンジャミン・フランクリンは「二重眼鏡」と呼んだものを発明しました。今日ではそれを遠近両用眼鏡と呼びますが、彼ができるようになったことは、上を見上げると遠くが見え、下を見ると近くが見えるようになったことです。今日では、焦点の電力を上から下までスムーズに変化させてラインを取り除くプログレッシブレンズもあります。これらの両方のデメリットは、上から下へ分割されるため、任意の距離で視野が失われることです。

それが問題なのは、はしごや階段を降りるときを想像してみてください。足元を見るために下を見ると、それがぼやけているかもしれません。なぜぼやけているのでしょうか?まあ、下を見るとそれがレンズの近くの部分であり、次の段は腕の届く範囲を超えていたからです。目にとってはそれが遠いということです。

次に紹介したい解決策は、少し珍しいものですが、コンタクトレンズやレーシック手術で使用される場合があり、モノビジョンと呼ばれます。これは、優位な目を遠くに焦点を合わせ、もう一方の目を近くに焦点を合わせることで機能します。あなたの脳は、各目の視野から最も鮮明な部分を知恵よく組み合わせる作業を行いますが、二つの目がわずかに異なるものを見るため、双眼視で距離を判断するのが難しくなります。

では、どうなるのでしょうか?私たちはたくさんの解決策を考え出しましたが、どれも自然な焦点の復元にはなりません。どれも、ただ何かを見て、それが焦点になることを期待することはできません。ではなぜでしょうか?それを説明するためには、人間の目の解剖学を見てみる必要があります。

異なる距離に焦点を合わせることを可能にする目の部分を結晶体と呼びます。レンズを取り囲む筋肉があり、それはレンズを異なる形に変形させることができ、それによってその焦点電力が変化します。なぜ誰かが老視になると、結晶体が十分に硬くなり、もはや形状が変わらなくなるのです。

今、先ほどリストアップしたすべての解決策を振り返ると、それらはすべて他のものと共通する点がありますが、私たちの目とは異なり、それは静的であるということです。それは、義足のある海賊の光学的な相当物のようなものです。現代の義足の光学的相当物は何でしょうか?過去数十年間、何が「焦点可変レンズ」と呼ばれるものの創造と急速な発展を見てきました。

いくつかの異なるタイプがあります。機械的に移動するアルバレスレンズ、変形可能な液体レンズ、電子的に切り替えられる液晶レンズなどです。これらにはそれぞれのトレードオフがありますが、視覚体験に関しては妥協していません。任意の距離でシャープなフル視野の視界。

OK、素晴らしい。必要なレンズは既に存在します。問題解決完了、ですよね?そうはいきません。焦点可変レンズは方程式に少しの複雑さを加えます。レンズには、どの距離に焦点を合わせるべきかを知る方法がありません。必要なのは、遠くを見ているときには遠いものがシャープであり、近くを見ると近くのものが自動的に焦点が合う眼鏡です。それを考える必要もなく、あなたの視界で近くのものが焦点を合わせるようになります。

この数年間、私たちがスタンフォードで取り組んできたことは、レンズ周りに正確な知能を構築することです。私たちのプロトタイプは、焦点距離を推定するために仮想現実と拡張現実システムから技術を借りています。私たちには、どの方向に目が向いているかを認識できるアイ・トラッカーがあります。これを2つ使用することで、あなたの視線方向を三角測量して焦点の推定値を得ることができます。万が一のために、信頼性を高めるために、距離センサーも追加しました。センサーは世界を見つめるカメラで、物体までの距離を報告します。再び、あなたの視線方向を使用して、距離の推定値を2回目に得ることができます。その後、これら2つの距離の推定値を融合し、焦点可変レンズのパワーを適切に更新します。

次に、私たちにとっての次のステップは、実際の人々でデバイスをテストすることでした。したがって、約100人の老視患者を募集し、彼らにデバイスをテストしてもらい、パフォーマンスを測定しました。私たちが見たものは、その場で私たちに自動フォーカスが将来の技術であると納得させました。私たちの参加者はよりはっきりと見ることができ、より速く焦点を合わせることができ、現在の矯正よりも簡単でより良い焦点合わせの経験だと考えました。

単純に言えば、視覚に関して、自動フォーカスは今日使用されている静的な矯正と同様に妥協しません。しかし、私自身が進んでいるわけではありません。私と私の同僚にはやるべきことがたくさんあります。例えば、私たちのメガネは少し…大きいかもしれませんか?その理由の1つは、研究用や産業用によく使用されるよりも大きな部品を使用したことです。もう1つの理由は、現在のアイ・トラッキングアルゴリズムが必要な強靭さを持っていないため、すべてをしっかり固定する必要があるからです。

今後は、研究環境からスタートアップへ移行するにあたり、将来の自動フォーカルを徐々に通常のメガネに近づける計画を立てています。これを実現するためには、アイ・トラッキングソリューションの信頼性を大幅に向上させる必要があります。また、より小型で効率的なエレクトロニクスやレンズを組み込む必要があります。

ただし、現在のプロトタイプでも、今日の焦点可変レンズ技術が従来の静的な矯正形式を凌駕することが可能であることを示しています。ですから、時間の問題です。近い将来、どのメガネを使うかといったことを気にするのではなく、重要なことに集中できるようになるでしょう。ありがとうございました。

コメント

タイトルとURLをコピーしました