教育改革がもたらす個別学習の未来

In this poignant, funny follow-up to his fabled 2006 talk, Sir Ken Robinson makes the case for a radical shift from standardized schools to personalized learning — creating conditions where kids’ natural talents can flourish.

ケン・ロビンソンは、伝説的な 2006 年の講演のこの感動的で面白い続編で、画一化された学校から個別化された学習への根本的な移行、つまり子供たちの自然な才能が開花できる環境を作り出すことを主張しています。

タイトル Bring on the learning revolution!
アップロード 2015年9月16日
キャスト ケン・ロビンソン
スポンサーリンク

Bring on the learning revolution!(学習革命を起こしましょう!)

要約

気候危機と人間の資源危機

気候危機の他に、人間の資源危機が存在します。私たちは多くの人々の才能を十分に活用できていません。多くの人々が自分の才能を発見せず、仕事に喜びを見いだせないまま過ごしています。

教育の課題

教育システムは多くの人々をその才能から切り離し、自然資源と同様に深く埋もれた人間の資源を発見する手助けをしていません。教育は改革を超え、根本的なイノベーションが必要です。直線的な学びのモデルから、より有機的なアプローチへの転換が求められます。

個人の才能と情熱

人々には多様な才能があり、情熱を持って取り組むことが重要です。教育は、人々が自分の情熱を見つけ、その才能を最大限に発揮できる環境を提供するべきです。直線的なキャリアパスに固執せず、多様な学びの道を認めることが必要です。

新しい教育モデル

教育の新しいモデルは、産業的な一律のアプローチから、有機的で個別化されたアプローチへの移行です。教育は、学生一人ひとりの才能を見つけ、それを伸ばす環境を作ることが求められます。これには、技術と教師の才能を活用したパーソナライズされたカリキュラムが必要です。

文字起こし

I was here four years ago, and I remember, at the time, that the talks weren’t put online. I think they were given to TEDsters in a box, a box set of DVDs, which they put on their shelves, where they are now.
(Laughter)
And actually, Chris called me a week after I’d given my talk and said, “We’re going to start putting them online. Can we put yours online?”
And I said, “Sure.”
And four years later, it’s been downloaded four million times. So I suppose you could multiply that by 20 or something to get the number of people who’ve seen it. And, as Chris says, there is a hunger for videos of me.
(Laughter)
(Applause)
Don’t you feel?
(Laughter)
So, this whole event has been an elaborate build-up to me doing another one for you, so here it is.
(Laughter)
Al Gore spoke at the TED conference I spoke at four years ago and talked about the climate crisis. And I referenced that at the end of my last talk. So I want to pick up from there because I only had 18 minutes, frankly.
(Laughter)
So, as I was saying —
(Laughter)
You see, he’s right. I mean, there is a major climate crisis, obviously, and I think if people don’t believe it, they should get out more.
(Laughter)
But I believe there is a second climate crisis, which is as severe, which has the same origins, and that we have to deal with with the same urgency. And you may say, by the way, “Look, I’m good. I have one climate crisis, I don’t really need the second one.”
(Laughter)
But this is a crisis of, not natural resources — though I believe that’s true — but a crisis of human resources. I believe fundamentally, as many speakers have said during the past few days, that we make very poor use of our talents. Very many people go through their whole lives having no real sense of what their talents may be, or if they have any to speak of. I meet all kinds of people who don’t think they’re really good at anything. Actually, I kind of divide the world into two groups now. Jeremy Bentham, the great utilitarian philosopher, once spiked this argument. He said, “There are two types of people in this world: those who divide the world into two types and those who do not.”
(Laughter)
Well, I do.
(Laughter)
I meet all kinds of people who don’t enjoy what they do. They simply go through their lives getting on with it. They get no great pleasure from what they do. They endure it rather than enjoy it, and wait for the weekend. But I also meet people who love what they do and couldn’t imagine doing anything else. If you said, “Don’t do this anymore,” they’d wonder what you’re talking about. It isn’t what they do, it’s who they are. They say, “But this is me, you know. It would be foolish to abandon this because it speaks to my most authentic self.” And it’s not true of enough people. In fact, on the contrary, I think it’s still true of a minority of people. And I think there are many possible explanations for it. And high among them is education because education, in a way, dislocates very many people from their natural talents. And human resources are like natural resources; they’re often buried deep. You have to go looking for them, they’re not just lying around on the surface. You have to create the circumstances where they show themselves. And you might imagine education would be the way that happens, but too often, it’s not. Every education system in the world is being reformed at the moment and it’s not enough. Reform is no use anymore because that’s simply improving a broken model. What we need — and the word’s been used many times in the past few days — is not evolution, but a revolution in education. This has to be transformed into something else.
(Applause)
One of the real challenges is to innovate fundamentally in education. Innovation is hard because it means doing something that people don’t find very easy, for the most part. It means challenging what we take for granted, things that we think are obvious. The great problem for reform or transformation is the tyranny of common sense. Things that people think, “It can’t be done differently, that’s how it’s done.” I came across a great quote recently from Abraham Lincoln, who I thought you’d be pleased to have quoted at this point.
(Laughter)
He said this in December 1862 to the second annual meeting of Congress. I ought to explain that I have no idea what was happening at the time. We don’t teach American history in Britain.
(Laughter)
We suppress it. You know, this is our policy.
(Laughter)
No doubt, something fascinating was happening then, which the Americans among us will be aware of. But he said this: “The dogmas of the quiet past are inadequate to the stormy present. The occasion is piled high with difficulty, and we must rise with the occasion.” I love that. Not rise to it, rise with it. “As our case is new, so we must think anew and act anew. We must disenthrall ourselves, and then we shall save our country.” I love that word, “disenthrall.” You know what it means? That there are ideas that all of us are enthralled to, which we simply take for granted as the natural order of things, the way things are. And many of our ideas have been formed, not to meet the circumstances of this century, but to cope with the circumstances of previous centuries. But our minds are still hypnotized by them, and we have to disenthrall ourselves of some of them. Now, doing this is easier said than done. It’s very hard to know, by the way, what it is you take for granted. And the reason is that you take it for granted.
(Laughter)
Let me ask you something you may take for granted. How many of you here are over the age of 25? That’s not what you take for granted, I’m sure you’re familiar with that. Are there any people here under the age of 25? Great. Now, those over 25, could you put your hands up if you’re wearing your wristwatch? Now that’s a great deal of us, isn’t it? Ask a room full of teenagers the same thing. Teenagers do not wear wristwatches. I don’t mean they can’t, they just often choose not to. And the reason is we were brought up in a pre-digital culture, those of us over 25. And so for us, if you want to know the time, you have to wear something to tell it. Kids now live in a world which is digitized, and the time, for them, is everywhere. They see no reason to do this. And by the way, you don’t need either; it’s just that you’ve always done it and you carry on doing it. My daughter never wears a watch, my daughter Kate, who’s 20. She doesn’t see the point. As she says, “It’s a single-function device.”
(Laughter)
“Like, how lame is that?” And I say, “No, no, it tells the date as well.”
(Laughter)
“It has multiple functions.”
(Laughter)
But, you see, there are things we’re enthralled to in education. A couple of examples. One of them is the idea of linearity: that it starts here and you go through a track and if you do everything right, you will end up set for the rest of your life. Everybody who’s spoken at TED has told us implicitly, or sometimes explicitly, a different story: that life is not linear; it’s organic. We create our lives symbiotically as we explore our talents in relation to the circumstances they help to create for us. But, you know, we have become obsessed with this linear narrative. And probably the pinnacle for education is getting you to college. I think we are obsessed with getting people to college. Certain sorts of college. I don’t mean you shouldn’t go, but not everybody needs to go, or go now. Maybe they go later, not right away. And I was up in San Francisco a while ago doing a book signing. There was this guy buying a book, he was in his 30s. I said, “What do you do?” And he said, “I’m a fireman.” I asked, “How long have you been a fireman?” “Always. I’ve always been a fireman.” “Well, when did you decide?” He said, “As a kid. Actually, it was a problem for me at school, because at school, everybody wanted to be a fireman.”
(Laughter)
He said, “But I wanted to be a fireman.” And he said, “When I got to the senior year of school, my teachers didn’t take it seriously. This one teacher didn’t take it seriously. He said I was throwing my life away if that’s all I chose to do with it; that I should go to college, I should become a professional person, that I had great potential and I was wasting my talent to do that.” He said, “It was humiliating. It was in front of the whole class and I felt dreadful. But it’s what I wanted, and as soon as I left school, I applied to the fire service and I was accepted. You know, I was thinking about that guy recently, just a few minutes ago when you were speaking, about this teacher, because six months ago, I saved his life.”
(Laughter)
He said, “He was in a car wreck, and I pulled him out, gave him CPR, and I

saved his wife’s life as well.” He said, “I think he thinks better of me now.”
(Laughter)
(Applause)
You know, to me, human communities depend upon a diversity of talent, not a singular conception of ability. And at the heart of our challenges —
(Applause)
At the heart of the challenge is to reconstitute our sense of ability and of intelligence. This linearity thing is a problem. When I arrived in L.A. about nine years ago, I came across a policy statement — very well-intentioned — which said, “College begins in kindergarten.” No, it doesn’t.
(Laughter)
It doesn’t. If we had time, I could go into this, but we don’t.
(Laughter)
Kindergarten begins in kindergarten.
(Laughter)
A friend of mine once said, “A three year-old is not half a six year-old.”
(Laughter)
(Applause)
They’re three. But as we just heard in this last session, there’s such competition now to get into kindergarten — to get to the right kindergarten — that people are being interviewed for it at three. Kids sitting in front of unimpressed panels, you know, with their resumes —
(Laughter)
Flicking through and saying, “What, this is it?”
(Laughter)
(Applause)
“You’ve been around for 36 months, and this is it?”
(Laughter)
“You’ve achieved nothing — commit.
(Laughter)
Spent the first six months breastfeeding, I can see.”
(Laughter)
See, it’s outrageous as a conception. The other big issue is conformity. We have built our education systems on the model of fast food. This is something Jamie Oliver talked about the other day. There are two models of quality assurance in catering. One is fast food, where everything is standardized. The other is like Zagat and Michelin restaurants, where everything is not standardized, they’re customized to local circumstances. And we have sold ourselves into a fast-food model of education, and it’s impoverishing our spirit and our energies as much as fast food is depleting our physical bodies.
(Applause)
We have to recognize a couple of things here. One is that human talent is tremendously diverse. People have very different aptitudes. I worked out recently that I was given a guitar as a kid at about the same time that Eric Clapton got his first guitar.
(Laughter)
It worked out for Eric, that’s all I’m saying.
(Laughter)
In a way — it did not for me. I could not get this thing to work no matter how often or how hard I blew into it. It just wouldn’t work.
(Laughter)
But it’s not only about that. It’s about passion. Often, people are good at things they don’t really care for. It’s about passion, and what excites our spirit and our energy. And if you’re doing the thing that you love to do, that you’re good at, time takes a different course entirely. My wife’s just finished writing a novel, and I think it’s a great book, but she disappears for hours on end. You know this, if you’re doing something you love, an hour feels like five minutes. If you’re doing something that doesn’t resonate with your spirit, five minutes feels like an hour. And the reason so many people are opting out of education is because it doesn’t feed their spirit, it doesn’t feed their energy or their passion. So I think we have to change metaphors. We have to go from what is essentially an industrial model of education, a manufacturing model, which is based on linearity and conformity and batching people. We have to move to a model that is based more on principles of agriculture. We have to recognize that human flourishing is not a mechanical process; it’s an organic process. And you cannot predict the outcome of human development. All you can do, like a farmer, is create the conditions under which they will begin to flourish. So when we look at reforming education and transforming it, it isn’t like cloning a system. There are great ones, like KIPP’s; it’s a great system. There are many great models. It’s about customizing to your circumstances and personalizing education to the people you’re actually teaching. And doing that, I think, is the answer to the future because it’s not about scaling a new solution; it’s about creating a movement in education in which people develop their own solutions, but with external support based on a personalized curriculum. Now in this room, there are people who represent extraordinary resources in business, in multimedia, in the Internet. These technologies, combined with the extraordinary talents of teachers, provide an opportunity to revolutionize education. And I urge you to get involved in it because it’s vital, not just to ourselves, but to the future of our children. But we have to change from the industrial model to an agricultural model, where each school can be flourishing tomorrow. That’s where children experience life. Or at home, if that’s what they choose, to be educated with their families or friends. There’s been a lot of talk about dreams over the course of these few days. And I wanted to just very quickly — I was very struck by Natalie Merchant’s songs last night, recovering old poems. I wanted to read you a quick, very short poem from W. B. Yeats, who some of you may know. He wrote this to his love, Maud Gonne, and he was bewailing the fact that he couldn’t really give her what he thought she wanted from him. And he says, “I’ve got something else, but it may not be for you.” He says this: “Had I the heavens’ embroidered cloths, Enwrought with gold and silver light, The blue and the dim and the dark cloths Of night and light and the half-light, I would spread the cloths under your feet: But I, being poor, have only my dreams; I have spread my dreams under your feet; Tread softly because you tread on my dreams.” And every day, everywhere, our children spread their dreams beneath our feet. And we should tread softly. Thank you.
(Applause)
Thank you very much.
(Applause)
Thank you.
(Applause)

和訳

私はここに4年前に来ましたが、その時は、講演はオンラインにアップロードされていませんでした。TEDの参加者には、DVDのセットが箱に入って渡され、それを棚に並べていたのを覚えています。
(笑い)
実際、講演を終えた一週間後にクリスから電話があり、「これから講演をオンラインで公開しようと思ってるんだけど、君の講演も載せてもいいかな?」と言われました。
私は「もちろん」と答えました。
そして4年後、私の講演は400万回ダウンロードされました。だから、視聴者数を20倍にするなどして計算すると、その数になります。クリスが言うように、私のビデオに対する飢餓感があるのです。
(笑い)
(拍手)
そう感じませんか?
(笑い)
というわけで、このイベント全体は私がもう一度講演をするための壮大な前振りだったのです。では、こちらをどうぞ。
(笑い)
4年前、私が講演したTEDカンファレンスでアル・ゴアが気候危機について語りました。私は前回の講演の最後でそのことに触れました。だから、そこから続けて話したいと思います。というのも、前回は18分しかなかったので。
(笑い)
だから、話を続けますね —
(笑い)
見てください、彼の言う通りです。確かに大きな気候危機があります。これを信じない人はもっと外に出るべきだと思います。
(笑い)
でも、私はもう一つの気候危機があると信じています。それは同じくらい深刻で、同じ起源を持ち、同じ緊急性で対処する必要があります。あなたは、「ちょっと待ってくれ、私は一つの気候危機だけで十分だ」と言うかもしれませんが、これは自然資源の危機ではありません — それも確かに問題ですが — これは人間の資源の危機です。私は基本的に、過去数日間に多くの講演者が言ったように、私たちは自分たちの才能を非常にうまく活用できていないと思います。多くの人が一生を通じて自分の才能が何か、あるいは何か特別な才能があるかどうかさえわからずに過ごしています。私は自分が何も得意ではないと思っている人々にたくさん会います。実際、私は今、世界を二つのグループに分けています。偉大な功利主義哲学者ジェレミー・ベンサムは、この議論を一度に打ち破りました。彼は、「この世界には二種類の人間がいる。世界を二種類に分ける人と、そうでない人だ。」と言いました。
(笑い)
私は、世界を二種類に分ける方の人間です。
(笑い)
私は、仕事を楽しんでいない人々にたくさん会います。彼らはただ日々の仕事をこなしているだけです。仕事から大きな喜びを得ることはなく、それを楽しむのではなく耐え忍び、週末を待ち望んでいます。でも、私はまた、自分の仕事を愛していて、他のことをするなんて考えられないという人々にも会います。もし「もうこれをしないで」と言われたら、彼らは何を言っているのか理解できないでしょう。それは彼らが「これが自分だ」と感じているからです。「これをやめるなんて馬鹿げている。これは私の最も本物の自己を表現しているから。」と言います。これは、十分な数の人々に当てはまっていません。実際、逆にまだ少数派の人々に当てはまっていると思います。そして、これには多くの理由が考えられます。その中でも大きな理由の一つが教育です。教育は、多くの人々を自分の本来の才能から切り離してしまうのです。そして、人間の資源は自然資源と同じようなものです。それらはしばしば深く埋もれていて、探さなければならないのです。それらは表面に転がっているわけではなく、発見される環境を整える必要があります。教育がその手助けをするものだと思われるかもしれませんが、実際にはそうではないことが多いのです。世界中のすべての教育システムが現在改革されていますが、それでは十分ではありません。改革はもはや役に立ちません。それは単に壊れたモデルを改善するだけだからです。私たちが必要なのは、進化ではなく革命です。これを別のものに変える必要があります。
(拍手)
教育における真の課題は、根本的なイノベーションを起こすことです。イノベーションは難しいものです。それは、ほとんどの人が簡単だと感じないことをすることを意味します。それは、当たり前だと思っていることに挑戦することを意味します。改革や変革にとっての大きな問題は、常識の専制です。人々が「それは違うやり方ができない、それがやり方だ」と思っていることです。最近、エイブラハム・リンカーンの素晴らしい引用に出会いました。皆さんがこの時点で引用されるのを喜んでくれると思います。
(笑い)
彼は1862年12月に第二回目の年次議会でこう言いました。この時何が起こっていたかは全く分かりません。イギリスではアメリカの歴史を教えません。
(笑い)
我々はそれを抑制しています。これが我々の政策です。
(笑い)
アメリカ人の皆さんには何か興味深いことが起こっていたのでしょう。しかし、彼はこう言いました。「静かな過去の教義は嵐の現在には不十分である。機会は困難に満ちており、私たちはその機会と共に立ち上がらなければならない。」私はこれが好きです。それに立ち向かうのではなく、それと共に立ち上がる。「私たちの事態が新しいのだから、私たちは新しい思考と新しい行動をしなければならない。私たちは自らを解放しなければならない、そうすれば私たちは国を救うことができる。」私は「解放」という言葉が好きです。それは、私たち全員が自然な秩序として当然だと考えているアイデアがあるという意味です。しかし、それらの多くは、この世紀の状況に対応するためではなく、過去の世紀の状況に対応するために形成されたものです。しかし、私たちの心はまだそれに魅了されており、いくつかのものから自らを解放する必要があります。これを行うことは言うは易く行うは難しです。自分が何を当然だと思っているのかを知るのは非常に難しいです。そして、その理由は、それを当然だと思っているからです。
(笑い)
一つ、あなたが当然だと思っているかもしれないことをお聞きします。ここにいる方の中で、25歳以上の方はどれくらいいらっしゃいますか?これは当然だと思っていることではないでしょう。おそらく、よくご存じでしょう。25歳未満の方はいらっしゃいますか?素晴らしい。では、25歳以上の方で、腕時計をしている方は手を挙げてください。これは大多数の人ですね。同じことをティーンエイジャーに聞いてみてください。ティーンエイジャーは腕時計をしません。できないわけではなく、ただ選ばないのです。理由は、私たちがデジタル以前の文化で育ったからです。25歳以上の人たちにとって、時間を知りたいなら、時間を教えてくれる何かを身につける必要があります。子供たちは今やデジタルの世界に住んでいて、時間はどこにでもあります。彼らはそれをする理由を見つけません。そして、あなたもそれを必要としないのです。単にいつもそうしてきたから続けているのです。私の娘ケイト

は20歳ですが、腕時計をしません。彼女はその必要性を感じません。彼女は「それは単機能デバイスだから」と言います。
(笑い)
「どれだけダサいのか」と。そして私は、「いやいや、日付も教えてくれるんだよ」と言います。
(笑い)
「多機能だよ」と。
(笑い)
しかし、教育にも私たちが魅了されているものがあります。いくつかの例を挙げます。その一つは直線性のアイデアです。それはここから始まり、トラックを進んでいき、すべてを正しく行えば、一生安泰になるというものです。TEDで話したすべての人が暗黙のうちに、あるいは時には明確に、異なる話をしています。人生は直線的ではなく、有機的です。私たちは自分の才能を探求し、それが作り出す状況と共に共生的に自分の人生を創造します。しかし、私たちはこの直線的な物語に夢中になってしまいました。そして、おそらく教育の頂点は大学に進むことです。私は私たちが人々を大学に進ませることに執着していると思います。特定の種類の大学です。行くべきではないとは言いませんが、全員が行く必要はありませんし、今すぐに行く必要もありません。後で行くかもしれないし、すぐには行かないかもしれません。私は最近、サンフランシスコでサイン会をしていました。30代の男性が本を買っていました。「何をしているのですか?」と聞いたら、「消防士です」と言いました。「どれくらい消防士をしているのですか?」と聞くと、「いつもです。ずっと消防士です」と。「それをいつ決めましたか?」と聞くと、「子供の頃です。実際、学校では問題でした。学校ではみんなが消防士になりたがっていたからです。」
(笑い)
彼は、「でも私は消防士になりたかったのです。」と言いました。そして彼は、「高校の最終学年に進んだとき、先生たちはそれを真剣に受け止めてくれませんでした。ある先生はそれを真剣に受け止めてくれませんでした。彼は私がそれを選ぶだけで人生を台無しにしていると言いました。大学に行って専門職になるべきだと言われました。私は大きな潜在能力を持っているので、それをすることで才能を無駄にしていると言われました。」彼は、「それは屈辱的でした。クラス全体の前で言われ、ひどく落ち込みました。しかし、それが私が望んでいたことで、学校を卒業してすぐに消防士になりました。」彼は、「最近、その先生のことを考えていました。実は、6か月前に彼の命を救いました。」
(笑い)
彼は、「彼は交通事故に遭い、私は彼を車から引き出し、心肺蘇生を行い、彼の妻の命も救いました。」彼は、「彼は今では私のことをもっと良く思っていると思います。」
(笑い)
(拍手)
私にとって、人間のコミュニティは、多様な才能に依存しており、単一の能力の概念ではないことです。そして私たちの課題の中心には —
(拍手)
課題の中心には、私たちの能力と知性の感覚を再構成することがあります。この直線性の問題があります。私が約9年前にロサンゼルスに来たとき、非常に意図された政策声明に出会いました。それは、「大学教育は幼稚園から始まる」というものでした。いいえ、違います。
(笑い)
違います。時間があればこれについて詳しく話せますが、今はありません。
(笑い)
幼稚園は幼稚園から始まります。
(笑い)
友人が言ったことがあります。「三歳児は六歳児の半分ではない。」
(笑い)
(拍手)
彼らは三歳です。しかし、私たちがこの最後のセッションで聞いたように、今や幼稚園に入るための競争が激しくなっています。正しい幼稚園に入るために、人々は三歳で面接を受けています。子供たちは、印象の悪いパネルの前に座り、履歴書を持って —
(笑い)
「これが全部か?」とページをめくっているのです。
(笑い)
(拍手)
「君は36か月しか生きていないのに、これが全部か?」
(笑い)
「何も成し遂げていない — 真剣になれ。
(笑い)
最初の6か月は授乳に費やしたんだね。」
(笑い)
これは概念としてはばかげています。もう一つの大きな問題は画一性です。私たちは教育システムをファーストフードのモデルに基づいて構築してきました。これはジェイミー・オリバーがこの間話していたことです。ケータリングの品質保証には二つのモデルがあります。一つはファーストフードで、すべてが標準化されています。もう一つはザガットやミシュランのレストランのように、すべてが標準化されていないもので、それぞれの状況に応じてカスタマイズされています。そして、私たちは教育のファーストフードモデルに自分たちを売り込み、それが私たちの精神とエネルギーを貧弱にしています。
(拍手)
ここで認識しなければならないことがいくつかあります。一つは、人間の才能は非常に多様であるということです。人々には非常に異なる適性があります。最近、私が子供の頃にギターを与えられたのは、エリック・クラプトンが最初のギターを手に入れたのとほぼ同じ時期であることが分かりました。
(笑い)
エリックにとってはうまくいきました。私はそうは言っていません。
(笑い)
ある意味では — 私にはうまくいきませんでした。どれだけ頻繁に、どれだけ強く吹いても、このものを動かすことができませんでした。
(笑い)
しかし、それだけではありません。それは情熱についてです。多くの場合、人々は本当に好きではないことに長けています。それは情熱についてであり、私たちの精神とエネルギーを興奮させるものです。そして、あなたが好きなことをしているなら、時間は全く異なるコースを取ります。私の妻はちょうど小説を書き終えましたが、素晴らしい本だと思いますが、彼女は何時間も消えてしまいます。あなたがこれを知っているなら、あなたが愛することをしているなら、一時間が五分のように感じます。あなたが心に響かないことをしているなら、五分が一時間のように感じます。そして、多くの人々が教育から脱落する理由は、それが彼らの精神に栄養を与えず、エネルギーや情熱を提供しないからです。だから、私たちは比喩を変えなければなりません。私たちは基本的に産業モデルの教育から離れなければなりません。これは直線性と画一性、人々を一括りにすることに基づいています。私たちは農業の原則に基づくモデルに移行しなければなりません。人間の繁栄は機械的なプロセスではなく、有機的なプロセスです。人間の発展の結果を予測することはできません。農夫のように、彼らが繁栄し始めるための条件を作り出すことしかできません。だから、教育を改革し変革する際には、それを複製するようなものではありません。KIPPのような素晴らしいシステムがあります。それは素晴らしいシステムです。他にも多くの素晴らしいモデルがあります。それは、あなたの状況に合わせてカスタマイズし、実際に教えている人々に合わせて教育をパーソナライズすることです。そして、私はそれが未来への答えだと思います。それは新しい解決策を拡大することではなく、人々が自

分自身の解決策を開発する教育のムーブメントを作り出すことです。しかし、外部の支援に基づいたパーソナライズされたカリキュラムに基づいて行うことです。この部屋には、ビジネス、マルチメディア、インターネットの驚異的なリソースを代表する人々がいます。これらの技術と教師たちの驚異的な才能を組み合わせることで、教育を革命的に変える機会が生まれます。そして、私はあなたにそれに関与することを強く勧めます。それは私たち自身だけでなく、私たちの子供たちの未来にとっても重要だからです。しかし、私たちは産業モデルから農業モデルに移行しなければなりません。明日、すべての学校が繁栄できる場所にすることです。それが子供たちが人生を経験する場所です。あるいは、家庭で教育を選ぶなら、それも良いでしょう。これまでの数日間、多くの夢について話がありました。私はとても感銘を受けたナタリー・マーチャントの昨晩の歌、古い詩を取り戻すものについて、ちょっとだけ触れたいと思います。W. B. イェーツの短い詩を読ませていただきます。彼は愛する人、モード・ゴーンにこの詩を書きました。彼は、自分が彼女に与えたいと思っていたものを本当に与えることができなかったことを嘆いています。そして、彼は「他に何かあるけれど、それは君のためではないかもしれない」と言います。彼はこう言います。「もし私が天の刺繍された布を持っていたなら、金と銀の光で織り込まれた、夜と光と半光の青と薄暗い暗い布、それを君の足元に広げただろう。しかし、私は貧しいので、自分の夢しか持っていない。私は夢を君の足元に広げた。そっと踏んでくれ、君は私の夢の上を歩いているのだから。」そして毎日、至る所で、私たちの子供たちは私たちの足元に夢を広げています。私たちはそっと踏むべきです。ありがとうございました。
(拍手)
どうもありがとうございました。
(拍手)
ありがとうございます。
(拍手)

タイトルとURLをコピーしました