黒人作家の娘が語る自由への物語アマンダ・ゴーマンの詩

エンターテインメント

For anyone who believes poetry is stuffy or elitist, Amanda Gorman — the youngest inaugural poet in US history — has some characteristically well-chosen words. Poetry is for everyone, she says, and at its core it’s all about connection and collaboration. In this fierce talk and performance, she explains why poetry is inherently political, pays homage to her honorary ancestors and stresses the value of speaking out despite your fears. “Poetry has never been the language of barriers,” Gorman says. “It’s always been the language of bridges.”

詩が息苦しい、あるいはエリート主義的だと信じている人にとって、米国史上最年少の就任詩人であるアマンダ・ゴーマンには、特徴的によく選ばれた言葉がいくつかある。

詩はすべての人のためのものであり、その核心はすべてつながりとコラボレーションである、と彼女は言います。 この激しいトークとパフォーマンスの中で、彼女は詩が本質的に政治的である理由を説明し、名誉ある先祖に敬意を表し、恐れにもかかわらず声を上げることの価値を強調します。 「詩は決して障壁となる言語ではありませんでした」とゴーマンは言う。 「それは常に橋の言語でした。」

タイトル Using your voice is a political choice
自分の声を使うことは政治的選択です
スピーカー アマンダ・ゴーマン
アップロード 2021/01/20
スポンサーリンク

「自分の声を使うことは政治的選択です(Using your voice is a political choice)」の文字起こし

I have two questions for you. One, whose shoulders do you stand on?

And two, what do you stand for? These are two questions that I always begin my poetry workshops with students because at times poetry can seem like this dead art form for like old white men who just seem like they were born to be old like you know Benjamin Button or something.

And I ask my students these two questions and then I share how I answer them, which is in these three sentences that go: “I am the daughter of black writers, we’re descended from freedom fighters who broke their chains and changed the world. They call me.” And these are words I repeat in a mantra before every single poetry performance. In fact, I was like doing it in the corner over there, I was like making faces. Um, and so I repeat them to myself as a way to gather myself because I’m not sure if you know but public speaking is pretty terrifying. Um, I know I’m on stage and I have my heels, I look all glam but I’m horrified.

And the way in which I kind of strengthen myself is by having this mantra. Most of my life I was particularly terrified of speaking up because I had a speech impediment which made it difficult to pronounce certain letters sounds and I felt like I was fine writing on the page. Once I got on stage, I was worried my words might jumble and stumble. What was the point in trying not to mumble these thoughts in my head if everything’s already been said before?

But finally, I had a moment of realization where I thought if I choose not to speak out of fear, then there’s no one that my silence is standing for. And so I came to realize that I cannot stand standing to the side, standing silent. I must find the strength to speak up. And one of the ways I do that is through this mantra where I call back to what I call honorary ancestors. These are people who might not be related to you by blood or by birth but who are more than worth saying their names because you stand on the shoulders all the same. And it’s only from the height of these shoulders that we might have the sight to see the mighty power of poetry, the power of language made accessible.

Accessible poetry is interesting because not everyone is going to become a great poet, but anyone can be and anyone can enjoy poetry. And it’s this openness, this accessibility of poetry that makes it the language of people. Poetry has never been the language of barriers; it’s always been the language of bridges. And it’s this connection-making that makes poetry yes powerful, but also makes it political.

One of the things that irritates me to no end is when I get that phone call, and it’s usually from a white man, and he’s like, “Man, Amanda, we love your poetry. We’d love to get you to write a poem about this subject, but don’t make it political.” Which to me sounds like I have to draw a square but not make it a rectangle, or like build a car and not make it a vehicle. It doesn’t make much sense because all art is political. The decision to create, the artistic choice to have a voice, the choice to be heard is the most political act of all.

And by political, I mean poetry is political at least three ways: one, what stories we tell; two, when we’re telling them; and three, how we’re telling them. If we’re telling them.

Why we’re telling them says so much about the political beliefs we have, about what types of stories matter. Secondly, who gets to have those stories told? I’m talking about who is legally allowed to read, who has the resources to be able to write, who are we reading in our classrooms. Says a lot about the political and educational systems that all these stories and storytellers exist in. Lastly, poetry is political because it’s preoccupied with people. If you look in history, notice that tyrants often go after the poets and the creatives first. They burn books, they try to get rid of poetry in the language arts because they’re terrified of them. Poets have this phenomenal potential to connect the beliefs of the private individual with the cause of change of the public, the population, the polity, the political movement. And when you leave here, I really want you to try to hear the ways in which poetry is actually at the center of our most political questions about what it means to be a democracy.

Maybe later you’re going to be at a protest and someone’s gonna have a poster that says “they buried us but they didn’t know we were seeds.” That’s poetry. You might be in your U.S. history class and your teacher may play a video of Martin Luther King Jr. saying “we will be able to hew out of this mountain of despair a stone of hope.” That’s poetry. Or maybe even here in New York City, you’re going to go visit the Statue of Liberty where there’s a sonnet that declares, “as Americans give us your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to be free.” So you see, when someone asks me to write a poem that’s not political, what they’re really asking me is to not ask charged and challenging questions in my poetic work. And that does not work because poetry is always at the pulse of the most dangerous and the most daring questions that a nation or world might face. What path do we stand on as a people, and what future as a people do we stand for?

And the thing about poetry is that it’s not really about having the right answers. It’s about asking these right questions about what it means to be a writer doing right by your words and your actions. And my reaction is to pay honor to those shoulders of people who use those pens to roll over boulders so I might have a mountain of hope on which to stand, so that I might understand the power of telling stories that matter, no matter what. So that I might realize that if I choose not out of fear, but out of courage to speak, then there’s something unique that my words can become. And all of a sudden, that fear that my words may jumble and stumble goes away as I’m humbled by the thoughts of thousands of stories a long time coming that I know are strumming inside me. As I celebrate those people in their time who stood up so this little black girl could find, as I celebrate and call their names all the same. These people who seemed like they were just born to be bold. Maya Angelou and Ozaki Shanghai, Phyllis Wheatley, Lucille Clifton, Gwendolyn Brooks, Joan Wicks, Audrey Lord, and so many more. It might feel like every story has been told before, but the truth is, no one’s ever told my story in the way I would tell it. As the daughter of black writers who were descended from freedom fighters who broke their chains and changed the world, they call me, I call them. And one day I’ll write a story right by writing it into tomorrow on this earth more than worth standing for.

「自分の声を使うことは政治的選択です(Using your voice is a political choice)」の和訳

みなさんに2つの質問があります。まず、誰の肩に立っているのか。

そして、あなたは何のために立っていますか?これは、私がいつも生徒たちと詩のワークショップを始めるときにする2つの質問です。ときには、詩は、ただの古い白人男性のための死んだ芸術のように思えることがあります。まるでベンジャミン・バトンのように生まれてくることができたかのような。

そして私は生徒にこの2つの質問をして、それから私がどのように答えるかを共有します。それは、この3つの文章で答えます。「私は黒人の作家の娘であり、自由を求めて鎖を破り、世界を変えた解放闘士の子孫です。彼らは私を呼んでいます。」これらは、私が毎回の詩のパフォーマンスの前に唱えるマントラです。実際、あちらの隅でしていたんです、顔をしかめながら。ええ、だから私は自分を集めるためにこれを繰り返します。公の場で話すことがかなり恐ろしいことはご存知かもしれませんが、舞台に立っているし、ヒールを履いて、華やかに見えるけれども、私は恐ろしいんです。

そして、私が自分を強くする方法は、このマントラを持つことです。私の人生のほとんどは、特に話すことが怖かったのです。発音が難しい特定の文字の音があるので、自分がページに書いているのは大丈夫だと感じていました。一度舞台に立つと、自分の言葉が混乱し、つまずくのではないかと心配でした。すでに何も言われているので、頭の中でこれらの考えをぼそぼそ言うのを試みることに何の意味があるのでしょうか?

しかし、最後に、恐れのために話さないことを選ぶと、私の沈黙のために立っている人は誰もいないことに気づきました。だから私は、横に立って、黙っていることができないことに気づきました。私は声を上げる勇気を見つけなければなりません。そして、私がそうする方法の1つは、私が名誉の祖先と呼ぶものに戻るこのマントラです。これらは、血縁または出生によって関連していないかもしれないが、同じようにあなたの肩に立っている価値がある人々です。そして、これらの肩の高さからのみ、私たちは詩の強大な力、言語のアクセス可能な力を見る目を持つことができるでしょう。

アクセス可能な詩は興味深いです。なぜなら、誰もが偉大な詩人になるわけではないが、誰もが詩人になり、詩を楽しむことができるからです。そして、この詩のオープンさ、このアクセス可能性が、それを人々の言葉にしています。詩は決して障壁の言語ではありません。それは常に橋の言語でした。そして、このつながり作りこそが、詩を力強くするだけでなく、政治的にもするのです。

私を最もイライラさせることの1つは、その電話を受けるときです。そして、通常、それは白人の男性からで、「マン、アマンダ、私たちはあなたの詩が大好きです。このテーマについて詩を書いてほしいんだけど、それを政治的にしないでくれよ。」と言われます。私にとってそれは、四角形を描いてそれを長方形にしないようにしたり、車を建ててそれを車両にしないようにするようなものです。それはあまり意味がありません。なぜなら、すべての芸術は政治的だからです。創造する決断、声を持つ芸術的な選択、聞かれることを選択することは、すべての中で最も政治的な行為です。

そして、政治的とは、詩が少なくとも3つの方法で政治的であることを意味します。一つは、私たちがどんな物語を語るかです。二つ目は、いつ物語を語るかです。三つ目は、どのように物語を語るかです。私たちが物語を語る理由は、私たちの政治的な信念、どのような種類の物語が重要かについて多くを語ります。次に、誰がその物語を語る権利があるのか。私は、誰が法的に読むことを許されているか、誰が書くためのリソースを持っているか、私たちの教室で誰を読んでいるかについて話しています。これらの物語と物語を語る人々が存在する政治と教育システムについて多くを語ります。最後に、詩は人々に夢中になっているので、詩は政治的です。歴史を見ればわかるように、専制君主たちはしばしば最初に詩人や創造的な人々に襲いかかります。彼らは本を燃やし、言語芸術で詩をなくそうとします。詩人は、私人の信念と大衆、人口、政治的運動の変化の原因とのつながりを形成する驚異的な可能性を持っています。そして、ここを去るとき、詩が実際には民主主義をどういう意味にするかについての私たちの最も政治的な問いの中心にある方法を聞いてほしいと思います。

もしかしたら後で抗議活動に参加して、誰かがポスターを持っているかもしれません。「彼らは私たちを埋めたが、私たちが種であることを知らなかった」と書かれています。それが詩です。あるいは、アメリカの歴史の授業で、先生がマーティン・ルーサー・キング・ジュニアが「この絶望の山から希望の石を切り出すことができるだろう」と言っているビデオを再生するかもしれません。それも詩です。あるいは、ここニューヨーク市で、自由の女神を訪れるかもしれません。そこには、十四行詩があり、「アメリカ人よ、疲れた者、貧しい者、自由を求めてうずくまっている者を我々に与えよ」と宣言されています。ですから、誰かが私に政治的でない詩を書くように頼むとき、彼らが実際に求めているのは、詩的な作品で充電された問いをしないでほしいということです。しかし、それはうまくいかないのです。なぜなら、詩は常に、国や世界が直面する最も危険で大胆な問いの脈動の中にあるからです。私たちはどのような道を歩んでいるのか、そして私たちは何の将来を歩んでいるのか、ということ。

詩についてのことは、正しい答えを持っていることではありません。自分の言葉と行動によって正しく行動する作家であることに関する正しい問いをすることです。私の反応は、私が希望の山に立つためにそのペンを使って岩を転がす人々の肩に敬意を表すことです。だからこそ、私は重要な物語を語る力を理解し、どんなことがあっても重要な物語を語る力を理解します。だからこそ、私が恐れからではなく勇気から選ぶことで、私の言葉が独自のものになるということを理解します。そして突然、私の言葉がごちゃごちゃになる恐れが消えていくと、私は内に漂っている何千もの物語の思いに感動します。私を見つけることができるように、彼らの時代に立ち上がった人々を称賛し、彼らの名前を呼びます。彼らはただ大胆に生まれたように見える人々です。マヤ・アンジェロウや尾崎行雄、フィリス・ウィートリー、ルシール・クリフトン、グウェンドリン・ブルックス、ジョアン・ウィクス、オードリー・ロード、そして他にもたくさんいます。すべての物語が以前に語られたかのように感じられるかもしれませんが、真実は、誰もが私の物語を私のように語ったことがないということです。私は自由のために鎖を破り、世界を変えた人々の子孫である黒人作家の娘として、彼らが私を呼び、私が彼らを呼びます。そしていつか私は、この地球で明日に書き込んで物語を書くでしょう。それは価値のあるものです。

タイトルとURLをコピーしました