人生の目標を見直すときの重要なポイントとは?

人生

Why are humans so slow to react to looming crises, like a forewarned pandemic or a warming planet? It’s because we’re reluctant to rethink, say organizational psychologist Adam Grant. From a near-disastrous hike on Panama’s highest mountain to courageously joining his high school’s diving team, Grant borrows examples from his own life to illustrate how tunnel vision around our goals, habits and identities can find us stuck on a narrow path. Drawing on his research, he shares counterintuitive insights on how to broaden your focus and remain open to opportunities for rethinking. (If you think you know something about frogs, watch until the end and get ready to think again.)

人間が前もって警告されたパンデミックや温暖化といった危機に対してなぜ反応が遅いのか?

それは、組織心理学者のアダム・グラントが言うには、私たちは再考することをためらっているからです。パナマの最高峰での危機一髪のハイキングから、勇気を持って高校のダイビングチームに参加するまで、グラントは自らの人生からの例を借りて、目標、習慣、アイデンティティについてのトンネルビジョンが私たちを狭い道に閉じ込めることを示します。彼の研究に基づいて、焦点を広げ、再考の機会に開かれたままでいる方法について、直感に反する洞察を共有します。(カエルについて何か知っていると思っているなら、最後まで見て、再び考える準備をしてください。)

タイトル What frogs in hot water can teach us about thinking again
熱湯の中のカエルが私たちにもう一度考えることについて教えてくれること
スピーカー アダム・グラント
アップロード 2021/05/11
スポンサーリンク

「熱湯の中のカエルが私たちにもう一度考えることについて教えてくれること(What frogs in hot water can teach us about thinking again)」の文字起こし

You might have heard that if you drop a frog in a pot of boiling water, it will jump out right away, but if you put it in lukewarm water, and then slowly heat it up, the frog won’t survive. The frog’s big problem is that it lacks the ability to rethink the situation. It doesn’t realize that the warm bath is becoming a death trap — until it’s too late.

Humans might be smarter than frogs, but our world is full of slow-boiling pots. Think about how slow people were to react to warnings about a pandemic, climate change or a democracy in peril. We fail to recognize the danger because we’re reluctant to rethink the situation.

We struggle with rethinking in all kinds of situations. We expect our squeaky brakes to keep working, until they finally fail on the freeway. We believe the stock market will keep going up, even after we hear about a real-estate bubble. And we keep watching “Game of Thrones” even after the show jumps the shark.

Rethinking isn’t a hurdle in every part of our lives. We’re happy to refresh our wardrobes and renovate our kitchens. But when it comes to our goals, identities and habits, we tend to stick to our guns. And in a rapidly changing world, that’s a huge problem.

I’m an organizational psychologist. It’s my job to rethink how we work, lead and live. But that hasn’t stopped me from getting stuck in slow-boiling pots, so I started studying why. I learned that intelligence doesn’t help us escape; sometimes, it traps us longer. Being good at thinking can make you worse at rethinking. There’s evidence that the smarter you are, the more likely you are to fall victim to the “I’m not biased” bias. You can always find reasons to convince yourself you’re on the right path, which is exactly what my friends and I did on a trip to Panama.

I worked my way through college, and by my junior year, I’d finally saved enough money to travel. It was my first time leaving North America. I was excited for my first time climbing a mountain, actually an active volcano, literally a slow-boiling pot. I set a goal to reach the summit and look into the crater.

So, we’re in Panama, we get off to a late start, but it’s only supposed to take about two hours to get to the top. After four hours, we still haven’t reached the top. It’s a little strange that it’s taking so long, but we don’t stop to rethink whether we should turn around. We’ve already come so far. We have to make it to the top. Do not stand between me and my goal. We don’t realize we’ve read the wrong map. We’re on Panama’s highest mountain, it actually takes six to eight hours to hike to the top.

By the time we finally reach the summit, the sun is setting. We’re stranded, with no food, no water, no cell phones, and no energy for the hike down. There’s a name for this kind of mistake, it’s called “escalation of commitment to a losing course of action.” It happens when you make an initial investment of time or money, and then you find out it might have been a bad choice, but instead of rethinking it, you double down and invest more. You want to prove to yourself and everyone else that you made a good decision.

Escalation of commitment explains so many familiar examples of businesses plummeting. Blockbuster, BlackBerry, Kodak. Leaders just kept simmering in their slow-boiling pots, failing to rethink their strategies.

Escalation of commitment explains why you might have stuck around too long in a miserable job, why you’ve probably waited for a table way too long at a restaurant, and why you might have hung on to a bad relationship long after your friends encouraged you to leave. It’s hard to admit that we were wrong and that we might have even wasted years of our lives. So we tell ourselves, “If I just try harder, I can turn this around.”

We live in a culture that worships at the altar of hustle and prays to the high priest of grit. But sometimes, that leads us to keep going when we should stop to think again. Experiments show that gritty people are more likely to overplay their hands in casino games and more likely to keep trying to solve impossible puzzles. My colleagues and I have found that NBA basketball coaches who are determined to develop the potential in rookies keep them around much longer than their performance justifies. And researchers have even suggested that the most tenacious mountaineers are more likely to die on expeditions, because they’re determined to do whatever it takes to reach the summit.

In Panama, my friends and I got lucky. About an hour into our descent, a lone pickup truck came down the volcano and rescued us from our slow-boiling pot. There’s a fine line between heroic persistence and stubborn stupidity. Sometimes the best kind of grit is gritting your teeth and packing your bags. “Never give up” doesn’t mean “keep doing the thing that’s failing.” It means “don’t get locked into one narrow path, and stay open to broadening your goals. The ultimate goal is to make it down the mountain, not just to reach the top. Your goals can give you tunnel vision, blinding you to rethinking the situation.

And it’s not just goals that can cause this kind of shortsightedness, it’s your identity too. As a kid, my identity was wrapped up in sports. I spent countless hours shooting hoops on my driveway, and then I got cut from the middle school basketball team, all three years. I spent a decade playing soccer, but I didn’t make the high school team. At that point, I shifted my focus to a new sport, diving.

I was bad, I walked like Frankenstein, I couldn’t jump, I could hardly touch my toes without bending my knees, and I was afraid of heights. But I was determined. I stayed at the pool until it was dark, and my coach kicked me out of practice. I knew that the seeds of greatness are planted in the daily grind, and eventually, my hard work paid off. By my senior year, I made the All-American list, and I qualified for the Junior Olympic Nationals. I was obsessed with diving. It was more than something I did, it became who I was.

I had a diving sticker on my car, and my email address was “diverag at aol.com.” Diving gave me a way to fit in and to stand out. I had a team where I belonged and a rare skill to share. I had people rooting for me and control over my own progress. But when I got to college, the sport that I loved became something I started to dread. At that level, I could not beat more talented divers by outworking them. I was supposed to be doing higher dives, but I was still afraid of heights, and 6am practice was brutal. My mind was awake, but my muscles were still asleep. I did back smacks and belly flops and my slow-boiling pot this time was a freezing pool.

There was one question, though, that stopped me from rethinking. “If I’m not a diver, who am I?” In psychology, there’s a term for this kind of failure to rethink —

It’s called “identity foreclosure.” It’s when you settle prematurely on a sense of who you are and close your mind to alternative selves. You’ve probably experienced identity foreclosure. Maybe you were too attached to an early idea of what school you’d go to, what kind of person you’d marry, or what career you’d choose. Foreclosing on one identity is like following a GPS that gives you the right directions to the wrong destination.

After my freshman year of college, I rethought my identity. I realized that diving was a passion, not a purpose. My values were to grow and excel, and to contribute to helping my teammates grow and excel. Grow, excel, contribute. I didn’t have to be a diver to grow, excel and contribute. Research suggests that instead of foreclosing on one identity, we’re better off trying on a range of possible selves. Retiring from diving freed me up to spend the summer doing psychology research and working as a diving coach. It also gave me time to concentrate on my dorkiest hobby, performing as a magician. I’m still working on my sleight of hand. Opening my mind to new identities opened new doors.

Research showed me that I enjoyed creating knowledge, not just consuming it. Coaching and performing helped me see myself as a teacher and an entertainer. If that hadn’t happened, I might not have become a psychologist and a professor, and I probably wouldn’t be giving this TED talk.

See, I’m an introvert, and when I first started teaching, I was afraid of public speaking. I had a mentor, Jane Dutton, who gave me some invaluable advice. She said, “You have to unleash your inner magician.” So I turned my class into a live show. Before the first day, I memorized my students’ names and backgrounds, and then, I mastered my routine. Those habits served me well. I started to relax more and I started to get good ratings.

But just like with goals and identities, the routines that help us today can become the ruts we get trapped in tomorrow. One day, I taught a class on the importance of rethinking, and afterward, a student came up and said, “You know, you’re not following your own principles.” They say feedback is a gift, but right then, I wondered, “How do I return this?” I was teaching the same material, the same way, year after year. I didn’t want to give up on a performance that was working. I had my act down. Even good habits can stand in the way of rethinking. There’s a name for that too. It’s called “cognitive entrenchment,” where you get stuck in the way you’ve always done things.

Just thinking about rethinking made me defensive. And then, I went through the stages of grief. I happened to be doing some research on emotion regulation at the time, and it came in handy. Although you don’t always get to choose the emotions you feel, you do get to pick which ones you internalize and which ones you express. I started to see emotions as works in progress, kind of like art. If you were a painter, you probably wouldn’t frame your first sketch. Your initial feelings are just a rough draft. As you gain perspective, you can rethink and revise what you feel. So that’s what I did. Instead of defensiveness, I tried curiosity. I wondered, “What would happen if I became the student?” I threw out my plan for one day of class, and I invited the students to design their own session. The first year, they wrote letters to their freshman selves, about what they wish they’d rethought or known sooner. The next year, they gave passion talks.

They each had one minute to share something they loved or cared about deeply. And now, all my students give passion talks to introduce themselves to the class. I believe that good teachers introduce new thoughts but great teachers introduce new ways of thinking. But it wasn’t until I ceded control that I truly understood how much my students had to teach one another, and me.

Ever since then, I put an annual reminder in my calendar to rethink what and how I teach. It’s a checkup. Just when you go to the doctor for an annual checkup when nothing seems to be wrong, you can do the same thing in the important parts of your life. A career checkup to consider how your goals are shifting. A relationship checkup to re-examine your habits. An identity checkup to consider how your values are evolving. Rethinking does not have to change your mind — it just means taking time to reflect and staying open to reconsidering. A hallmark of wisdom is knowing when to grit and when to quit, when to throw in the towel on an old identity and dive into a new one, when to walk away from some old habits and start scaling a new mountain. Your past can weigh you down, and rethinking can liberate you.

Rethinking is not just a skill to master personally, it’s a value we need to embrace culturally. We live in a world that mistakes confidence for competence, that pressures us to favor the comfort of conviction over the discomfort of doubt, that accuses people who change their minds of flip-flopping, when in fact, they might be learning. So let’s talk about how to make rethinking the norm. We need to invite it and to model it.

A few years ago, some of our students at Wharton challenged the faculty to do that. They asked us to record our own version of Jimmy Kimmel’s Mean Tweets. We took the worst feedback we’d ever received on student course evaluations, and we read it out loud.

Angela Duckworth: “It was easily one of the worst three classes I’ve ever taken… one of which the professor was let go after the semester.”
Mohamed El-Erian: “The number of stories you tell give ‘Aesop’s Fables’ a run for its money. Less can be more.”
Ouch.

Adam Grant: “You’re so nervous you’re causing us to physically shake in our seats.”
Mae McDonnell: “So great to finally have a professor from Australia. You started strong but then got softer. You need tenure, so toughen up with these brats.”
I’m from Alabama.

Michael Sinkinson: “Prof Sinkinson acts all down with pop culture but secretly thinks Ariana Grande is a font in Microsoft Word.”

After I show these clips in class, students give more thoughtful feedback. They rethink what’s relevant. They also become more comfortable telling me what to think, because I’m not just claiming I’m receptive to criticism. I’m demonstrating that I can take it. We need that kind of openness in schools, in families, in businesses, in governments, in nonprofits.

A couple of years ago, I was working on a project for the Gates Foundation, and I suggested that leaders could record their own version of Mean Tweets. Melinda Gates volunteered to go first, and one of the points of feedback that she read said “Melinda is like Mary effing Poppins.

Practically perfect in every way.

And then, she started listing her imperfections. People at the Gates Foundation who saw that video ended up becoming more willing to recognize and overcome their own limitations. They were also more likely to speak up about problems and solutions. What Melinda was modeling was confident humility. Confident humility is being secure enough in your strengths to acknowledge your weaknesses. Believing that the best way to prove yourself is to improve yourself, knowing that weak leaders silence their critics and make themselves weaker, while strong leaders engage their critics and make themselves stronger.

Confident humility gives you the courage to say “I don’t know,” instead of pretending to have all the answers. To say “I was wrong,” instead of insisting you were right. It encourages you to listen to ideas that make you think hard, not just the ones that make you feel good, and to surround yourself with people who challenge your thought process, not just the ones who agree with your conclusions. And sometimes, it even leads you to challenge your own conclusions, like with the story about the frog that can’t survive the slow-boiling pot.

I found out recently that’s a myth. If you heat up the water, the frog will jump out as soon as it gets uncomfortably warm. Of course it jumps out, it’s not an idiot. The problem is not the frog, it’s us. Once we accept the story as true, we don’t bother to think again. What if we were more like the frog, ready to jump out if the water gets too warm? We need to be quick to rethink. Thank you.

「熱湯の中のカエルが私たちにもう一度考えることについて教えてくれること(What frogs in hot water can teach us about thinking again)」の和訳

カエルを沸騰した鍋に落とすとすぐに飛び出すが、ぬるま湯に入れてゆっくり加熱すると、生き残れないと言われています。このカエルの大きな問題は、状況を再考する能力が欠けていることです。温かい風呂が死の罠に変わることに気付かないのです――気付く時には既に遅すぎます。

人間はカエルよりも賢いかもしれませんが、私たちの世界はゆっくりと沸騰する鍋で満ちています。パンデミック、気候変動、危機に瀕した民主主義についての警告に対して、人々が反応するのが遅かったことを思い出してください。私たちは状況を再考することをためらうため、危険を認識できないのです。

再考するのが難しい状況はたくさんあります。ブレーキが鳴るけれども、それでも効くと信じ続け、高速道路でついに壊れるまで使い続ける。住宅バブルの話を聞いても株価が上がり続けると信じる。そして「ゲーム・オブ・スローンズ」を見続け、シリーズが失速しても見続ける。

再考することはすべての生活面で難しいわけではありません。私たちは喜んでワードローブを刷新し、キッチンを改装します。しかし、目標、アイデンティティ、習慣に関しては、固執する傾向があります。急速に変化する世界では、これは大きな問題です。

私は組織心理学者です。私の仕事は、働き方、リーダーシップ、生活の仕方を再考することです。しかし、それでも私はゆっくりと沸騰する鍋に閉じ込められることがあります。それがなぜなのかを研究し始めました。知性が助けになるわけではありません。時には、知性が私たちをさらに長く閉じ込めることがあります。考えることが得意であるほど、再考することが難しくなるのです。「自分には偏見がない」と思い込むバイアスに陥りやすいのです。常に自分が正しい道を進んでいると納得させる理由を見つけることができます。これは、私と友人がパナマへの旅行中にやったことです。

大学を通じて働き、3年生の時にはついに旅行資金を貯めました。北アメリカを出るのは初めてでした。初めての山登り、実際には活火山の登頂に興奮していました。頂上に達し、火口を覗き込むことを目標にしていました。

パナマに到着し、出発が遅れましたが、頂上まで約2時間しかかからないはずでした。しかし、4時間経ってもまだ頂上に到達していません。時間がかかりすぎていることに少し疑問を感じましたが、引き返すことを再考しませんでした。すでに遠くまで来たので、頂上に到達するしかありません。目標達成を妨げるものは何もありません。間違った地図を読んでいたことに気付かなかったのです。実際には、パナマの最高峰にいて、頂上まで6〜8時間かかる山でした。

ついに頂上に到達した時、太陽は沈みかけていました。食料も水も携帯電話もなく、下山するエネルギーもありませんでした。このようなミスには名前があります。「損失に対するコミットメントのエスカレーション」と呼ばれます。時間やお金の初期投資を行い、それが間違った選択であることが判明した場合でも、再考せずにさらに投資を続けることです。自分自身と他人に良い決断をしたと証明したいのです。

コミットメントのエスカレーションは、企業の失敗の多くを説明します。ブロックバスター、ブラックベリー、コダック。リーダーたちは、戦略を再考せずにゆっくりと沸騰する鍋の中に閉じ込められ続けました。

コミットメントのエスカレーションは、悲惨な仕事に長く居続けた理由、レストランでテーブルを待ちすぎた理由、そして悪い関係に長くしがみついた理由も説明します。間違っていたことを認め、何年も浪費したかもしれないことを認めるのは難しいのです。だから、「もっと頑張れば、うまくいくはずだ」と自分に言い聞かせます。

私たちは、努力を崇拝し、忍耐力を称賛する文化の中に生きています。しかし、時には立ち止まって再考すべき時にも、進み続けることがあります。実験によると、粘り強い人々はカジノゲームで手を過信し、解決不可能なパズルに取り組み続ける可能性が高いことが示されています。私の同僚と私は、NBAバスケットボールのコーチたちが新人選手の潜在能力を引き出そうとするあまり、彼らの成績が正当化するよりも長くチームに残すことを発見しました。そして、研究者たちは、最も粘り強い登山家が遠征中に死亡する可能性が高いことを示唆しています。なぜなら、頂上に到達するために何が何でもやり遂げようとするからです。

パナマでは、私たちは幸運でした。下山を始めてから1時間ほどで、1台のピックアップトラックが火山を下りてきて、私たちを救出してくれました。英雄的な持久力と頑固な愚かさの間には微妙な境界線があります。時には最良の粘り強さは、歯を食いしばって荷物をまとめることです。「決して諦めない」とは、「失敗していることを続ける」という意味ではありません。「一つの狭い道に固執せず、目標を広げることを忘れない」という意味です。最終目標は頂上に到達することだけではなく、山を下りることです。目標は視野を狭くし、状況を再考することを妨げることがあります。

そして、目標だけでなく、アイデンティティもこのような近視眼的な行動を引き起こすことがあります。子供の頃、私のアイデンティティはスポーツに密接に関連していました。家の前でバスケットボールを何時間もシュートし、中学校のバスケットボールチームに3年間連続で落選しました。サッカーを10年間プレーしましたが、高校のチームには入れませんでした。その時点で、新しいスポーツに焦点を移しました。それがダイビングでした。

私は下手でした。フランケンシュタインのように歩き、ジャンプもできず、膝を曲げずに足の指に触れることもできず、高所恐怖症でした。しかし、私は決心していました。暗くなるまでプールに居続け、コーチに練習を中止させられるまで続けました。成功の種は日々の努力の中にあると信じていました。最終的には努力が報われ、高校3年生の時にはオールアメリカンリストに名を連ね、ジュニアオリンピックの全国大会に出場する資格を得ました。ダイビングに夢中になり、それは単なる活動ではなく、私の一部となりました。

車にはダイビングのステッカーが貼られ、メールアドレスは「diverag at aol.com」でした。ダイビングは私にフィットする方法と際立つ方法を提供しました。チームに所属し、希少なスキルを持っていました。応援してくれる人々がいて、自分の進歩を自分でコントロールできました。しかし、大学に入ると、愛していたスポーツが次第に恐れるものになっていきました。そのレベルでは、才能のあるダイバーを

努力で打ち負かすことはできませんでした。より高いダイブをすることが求められましたが、依然として高所恐怖症でしたし、朝6時の練習は過酷でした。精神は覚醒していても、筋肉はまだ眠っていました。背中を叩かれたり、お腹を打たれたりすることが多く、今回のゆっくりと沸騰する鍋は凍えるプールでした。

再考を妨げた一つの質問がありました。「もし私がダイバーでないなら、私は誰なのか?」心理学には、このような再考の失敗を説明する用語があります。それは「アイデンティティの早期閉鎖」と呼ばれます。それは、自分が誰であるかについて早急に決め込み、他の可能性を閉ざしてしまうことです。あなたもアイデンティティの早期閉鎖を経験したことがあるでしょう。例えば、どの学校に行くか、どんな人と結婚するか、どんな職業を選ぶかについて、初期のアイデアに固執しすぎたことがあるかもしれません。一つのアイデンティティに固執することは、正しい方向に導くGPSが誤った目的地に向かわせるようなものです。

大学1年生の終わりに、私はアイデンティティを再考しました。ダイビングは情熱であり、目的ではないことに気付きました。私の価値観は成長し、卓越し、チームメイトの成長と卓越を助けることでした。成長、卓越、貢献。ダイバーでなくても成長し、卓越し、貢献できるのです。研究によると、一つのアイデンティティに固執するよりも、さまざまな可能性のある自己を試す方が良いとされています。ダイビングから引退することで、夏に心理学の研究を行い、ダイビングコーチとして働くことができました。また、私の最もオタクな趣味であるマジックのパフォーマンスに集中する時間も得られました。まだ手品の技術を磨いています。新しいアイデンティティに心を開くことで、新しい扉が開かれました。

研究を通じて、知識を創造することが好きであることが分かりました。コーチングやパフォーマンスを通じて、私は教師やエンターテイナーとしての自分を見つけました。それがなければ、私は心理学者や教授にはなっていなかったかもしれませんし、このTEDトークをすることもなかったでしょう。

私は内向的な性格で、最初に教え始めた時は人前で話すのが怖かったのです。あるメンター、ジェーン・ダットンが私に貴重なアドバイスをくれました。「内なるマジシャンを解き放て」と言われました。そこで、私は授業をライブショーのようにしました。最初の日の前に、生徒たちの名前や背景を覚え、ルーティンを習得しました。これらの習慣は私を助け、次第にリラックスし、良い評価を得るようになりました。

しかし、目標やアイデンティティと同様に、今日助けとなるルーティンが明日の足枷になることもあります。ある日、再考の重要性について授業をしましたが、その後、生徒の一人が「自分自身の原則に従っていない」と言いました。フィードバックは贈り物だと言われますが、その時は「どうやって返すの?」と思いました。同じ教材を年々同じ方法で教えていました。うまくいっているパフォーマンスを諦めたくありませんでした。ルーティンが確立されていました。良い習慣でさえも再考の妨げになることがあります。これにも名前があります。それは「認知的固定」と呼ばれ、いつも通りのやり方に固執することです。

再考について考えるだけで、防衛的な気持ちになりました。そして、私は悲嘆の段階を経ました。ちょうどその時、感情調整についての研究をしていたので、それが役に立ちました。感じる感情を選ぶことはできなくても、内面化する感情と表現する感情を選ぶことはできます。感情を進行中の作品のように見るようになりました。もしあなたが画家なら、最初のスケッチを額に入れることはないでしょう。最初の感情はラフドラフトに過ぎません。視点を得ることで、感じ方を再考し、修正することができます。そうしました。防衛的な気持ちの代わりに、好奇心を試してみました。「もし私が生徒になったらどうなるだろう?」と疑問に思いました。授業の一日分の計画を捨て、生徒たちに自分たちで授業をデザインするよう招待しました。最初の年、生徒たちは自分たちの1年生の自分に宛てた手紙を書き、再考すべきだったことやもっと早く知っておくべきだったことを伝えました。翌年は、パッショントークを行いました。

生徒たちは、それぞれ1分間で、自分が愛することや深く関心を持っていることを共有しました。今では、すべての生徒が自己紹介としてパッショントークを行います。良い教師は新しい考えを導入し、優れた教師は新しい考え方を導入するのです。しかし、自分のコントロールを手放すまで、生徒たちがどれほど多くのことを教え合い、私に教えることができるかを真に理解していませんでした。

それ以来、毎年カレンダーに授業内容と教え方を再考するためのリマインダーを設定しています。それは定期健診のようなものです。何も問題がなさそうな時でも医者に行くように、人生の重要な部分でも同じことができます。キャリアの定期健診では目標の変化を考え直し、関係の定期健診では習慣を再考し、アイデンティティの定期健診では価値観の進化を考えます。再考は心を変える必要はありません。ただ時間を取って反省し、再考することにオープンであることです。知恵の象徴は、粘り強さと諦めるタイミングを知ること、古いアイデンティティを手放し、新しいアイデンティティに飛び込むこと、古い習慣から離れ、新しい山に登り始めることです。過去は重荷となり、再考は解放してくれます。

再考は個人的に習得するスキルだけでなく、文化的に受け入れるべき価値でもあります。自信を能力と誤解し、確信の快適さを疑いの不快感に優先する世界に生きています。心変わりした人を責める文化の中で、再考することを当たり前にする方法を話し合う必要があります。それを招待し、模範となる必要があります。

数年前、ウォートンの学生たちが私たち教職員にそれを挑戦しました。彼らは私たちにジミー・キンメルの「Mean Tweets」の自分版を録音するように頼みました。最悪の学生評価を受けたコースの評価を読み上げました。

アンジェラ・ダックワース:「これは簡単に言って、これまで受けた中で最悪の3つのクラスの一つでした…そのうちの一つは学期終了後に教授が解雇されました。」
モハメド・エル=エリアン:「物語の数が『イソップ物語』に匹敵する。少ない方が多いこともある。」
痛いですね。

アダム・グラント:「あなたは緊張しすぎていて、私たちを席で物理的に震えさせています。」
メイ・マクドネル:「オーストラリアからの教授に初めて会えて嬉しいです。始めは強かったのに、次第に弱くなりました。テニュアが必要なので、この子供たちに厳しくなり

ましょう。」
私はアラバマ出身です。

マイケル・シンキンソン:「シンキンソン教授はポップカルチャーに詳しそうに見せかけていますが、実際にはアリアナ・グランデがMicrosoft Wordのフォントだと思っています。」

これらのクリップを授業で見せた後、学生たちはより思慮深いフィードバックをくれるようになります。何が重要かを再考し、私に何を伝えるべきかについてもより快適に感じます。私は批判を受け入れる姿勢を示すだけでなく、それを実践しているのです。このようなオープンさが学校、家族、企業、政府、非営利団体に必要です。

数年前、私はゲイツ財団のプロジェクトに取り組んでおり、リーダーたちに自分版の「Mean Tweets」を録音することを提案しました。メリンダ・ゲイツが最初にボランティアをしました。彼女が読んだフィードバックの一つには、「メリンダはまるでメアリー・ポピンズのようです。実質的に完璧です」とありました。そして、彼女は自分の欠点をリストアップし始めました。そのビデオを見たゲイツ財団の人々は、自分たちの限界を認識し克服する意欲が高まりました。また、問題や解決策について発言する意欲も高まりました。メリンダが模範として示していたのは、自信ある謙虚さでした。自信ある謙虚さは、自分の強みを認識しながら、弱点を認めることです。自分を証明する最良の方法は、自分を向上させることだと信じ、弱いリーダーは批評家を沈黙させ、自分を弱くし、強いリーダーは批評家と対話し、自分を強くするのです。

自信ある謙虚さは、「知らない」と言う勇気を与えます。すべての答えを知っているふりをするのではなく、「間違っていた」と言う勇気を与えます。それは、考えさせられるアイデアに耳を傾けるように促し、気持ちが良いだけのアイデアではなく、考え方を挑戦する人々を周りに置くようにします。そして、時には自分の結論を挑戦することにもつながります。カエルがゆっくりと沸騰する鍋で生き残れないという話のように。

最近、それが神話であることが分かりました。水を加熱すると、カエルは不快に感じるとすぐに飛び出します。もちろん飛び出します。カエルはバカではありません。問題はカエルではなく、私たちです。話を真実として受け入れると、再考する手間を省きます。もし水が熱くなったらすぐに飛び出すカエルのようになったらどうでしょう?再考するのが速い必要があります。ありがとうございました。

タイトルとURLをコピーしました